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DRIVER_IRQL_NOT_LESS_OR_EQUAL - Help!

    Question

  • After 3 days of restless googling to no avail, I've succumbed to my bsod abd have been driven to actually make my own post on a tech support forum.

    First off, I did not install any new programs or hardware when this happened. 

    Three days ago, after a random fit of programs crashing and freezing, I was forced to shut down my laptop via holding the power button. Upon attempting to boot back in, I encountered a bsod of some sorrt (it wasn't actually blue...), which had an error along the lines of "0xc0000225 - A device is not accessible". This prevented me from booting into windows at all, including safe mode.

    A couple days' worth of screwing around with the bios settings my friend's windows 7 recovery disc led to some sort of progress, as I managed to convince the laptop to let me boot into safe mode (I had to run a disk check twice - once with "Automatically fix file system errors" checked, and again with both settings checked). At this point, any attempts to boot into any mode but safe mode gets me an actual BSOD - the illustrious DRIVER_IRQL_NOT_LESS_OR_EQUAL. (Safe mode with networking doesn't work.)

    From safe mode, I copied the memory dump to check out what caused the error, but... I have no idea what the eff I'm looking at. The only part of it that catches my attention (besides the fact that I'm missing a bunch of symbols) is "Probably caused by netio.sys". That being said, could any generous, awesome soul be of assistance? :)

    I uploaded the dump here: http://www.filedropper.com/memory

    Thanks in advance!
    Tuesday, February 23, 2010 1:13 PM

Answers

  • Since Windows system uses separated user mode and kernel mode memory space, stop errors are always caused by kernel portion components, such as a third-party device drivers, backup software or anti-virus services (buggy services).

    The system goes to a BSOD because there is some exceptions happened in the kernel (either the device driver errors or the service errors), and Windows implements this mechanism: When it detects some errors occur in the kernel, it will kill the box in case some more severe damage happens. Then we get a blue screen or the system reboots (it depends on what the system settings are).

    To troubleshoot this kind of kernel crash issue, we need to debug the crashed system dump. Unfortunately, debugging is beyond what we can do in the forum. A suggestion would be to contact Microsoft Customer Service and Support (CSS) via telephone so that a dedicated Support Professional can assist with your request. Please be advised that contacting phone support will be a charged call.

    To obtain the phone numbers for specific technology request please take a look at the web site listed below:

    Microsoft - Help and Support

    If you are outside the US please see Microsoft Worldwide Home for regional support phone numbers.

    Meantime we can try some available steps as a general troubleshoot.

    1. Please remove the antivirus and run the system with a period. If the issue does not occur, mainly focus on antivirus settings and compatibility. 
    2. Disable Automatic Restart and see detail information on the blue screen.

    1).Click Start, in the Start Search box enter sysdm.cpl.
    2).Click the tab Advanced. Under Startup and Recovery, click the Settings button.
    3). Uncheck “Automatically restart”.
    4). On the drop-down menu “Write debugging information”, choose “Small memory dump”.
    5). Click OK.

    When Blue Screen displays, try to find which *.sys file is cause the blue screen. Usually it is listed in the bottom part.


    Arthur Xie - MSFT
    Wednesday, February 24, 2010 9:52 AM
    Moderator

All replies

  • Ummpf, a dump of 121 MB? Anyway, the mainly affected files seem to be netio.sys and tcpip.sys, so's not surprising that "safe mode with networking doesn't work". There's something wrong with your network connection. The usual suspects (if corrupted system files or a misconfigured network can be excluded as possible causes) would be 3d party programs that operate at a very low level and can interfere with low-level drivers like netio.sys. The most typical example are AV programs that aren't fully compatible with Windows 7. It would be worth a try to uninstall all those applications in safe mode before trying a new start.
    "I think there is a world market for maybe five computers.” (Thomas J. Watson, Sr.)
    Tuesday, February 23, 2010 2:42 PM
  • Thanks for the reply. I only had Mcafee installed in terms of av software. I just tried uninstalling it and the blue screen is still there, but now I get a new one when I try logging into safe mode (after it gets stuck on loading classpnp.sys for a few minutes) - a BAD_SYSTEM_CONFIG_INFO. Fml.

    Now what? :\
    Tuesday, February 23, 2010 5:11 PM
  • This error points to RAM problems (faulty modules?) or to a damaged registry. The uninstall of AV software alone would possibly make the previous BSOD reappear (if parts of the software remain despite uninstallation) but not cause this new one. If you can boot from DVD, try to check the memory from there. If it seems ok, try to do a repair upgrade (install Windows 7 as "in-place" upgrade over itself) to recover missing or corrupt system files that prevent the OS from starting. Your installed programs won't be touched by this.
    "I think there is a world market for maybe five computers.” (Thomas J. Watson, Sr.)
    Tuesday, February 23, 2010 5:57 PM
  • Alright, well, this is odd - IT BOOTED NORMALLY! I'm not sure how or why, but after a successful startup repair from the recovery disk (which is weird, considering the last 12 or so I tried failed), I am now able to boot into windows normally - except it takes much longer to get past the "starting windows" screen than it used to. I'm guessing the new BSOD gave the recovery disk an error it could actually fix. But, hey, whatever works. I'm just glad I have a working laptop now.

    I did indeed try what you suggested - installing as an upgrade apparently required me to log into windows normally, which I couldn't do, and the memory test had found nothing wrong with the memory.

    Thanks a bunch for the help so far! Would you happen to have any idea why it's booting so slow?

    I'll definitely update if I get any new problems.

    Wednesday, February 24, 2010 12:25 AM
  • Since Windows system uses separated user mode and kernel mode memory space, stop errors are always caused by kernel portion components, such as a third-party device drivers, backup software or anti-virus services (buggy services).

    The system goes to a BSOD because there is some exceptions happened in the kernel (either the device driver errors or the service errors), and Windows implements this mechanism: When it detects some errors occur in the kernel, it will kill the box in case some more severe damage happens. Then we get a blue screen or the system reboots (it depends on what the system settings are).

    To troubleshoot this kind of kernel crash issue, we need to debug the crashed system dump. Unfortunately, debugging is beyond what we can do in the forum. A suggestion would be to contact Microsoft Customer Service and Support (CSS) via telephone so that a dedicated Support Professional can assist with your request. Please be advised that contacting phone support will be a charged call.

    To obtain the phone numbers for specific technology request please take a look at the web site listed below:

    Microsoft - Help and Support

    If you are outside the US please see Microsoft Worldwide Home for regional support phone numbers.

    Meantime we can try some available steps as a general troubleshoot.

    1. Please remove the antivirus and run the system with a period. If the issue does not occur, mainly focus on antivirus settings and compatibility. 
    2. Disable Automatic Restart and see detail information on the blue screen.

    1).Click Start, in the Start Search box enter sysdm.cpl.
    2).Click the tab Advanced. Under Startup and Recovery, click the Settings button.
    3). Uncheck “Automatically restart”.
    4). On the drop-down menu “Write debugging information”, choose “Small memory dump”.
    5). Click OK.

    When Blue Screen displays, try to find which *.sys file is cause the blue screen. Usually it is listed in the bottom part.


    Arthur Xie - MSFT
    Wednesday, February 24, 2010 9:52 AM
    Moderator