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Missing or corrupt winload.exe (0xc000000e)

    Question

  • I've encountered several posts regarding WBM issues with dual-boot systems, but I'm experiencing this issue with a single drive/single OS after Ghosting a Vista image to it.  The repair process has worked every time, but is there a workaround to avoid it altogether?  (using Vista Ultimate on Dell Latitude D820 w/ 80GB SATA HD)

     

    Thanks!

     

    TursiopsTech

    Friday, May 25, 2007 3:26 PM

Answers

  • I ran into this problem as well. 

    On a system I wanted to dump an image to, I would run a diskpart performing these actions: select disk 0, clean, create partition primary, assign letter=c:, active, exit and then format c: /q /y. 

     

    After that I booted to PE and ran an imagex /apply from an image located on a server.  Every single time I was getting that same error.  The issue is that the devices and the osdevice in bcdedit is set to unknown (run bcdedit from a working Vista system and one from PE on a non working Vista system and you will see what I mean). 

     

    To resolve the problem, I did these three commands from PE which resolved my problem:

     

     x:\windows\system32\bcdedit /set {default} device partition=c:
     x:\windows\system32\bcdedit /set {default} osdevice partition=c:
     x:\windows\system32\bcdedit /set {bootmgr} device partition=c:

     

    Good luck


     

    Friday, May 25, 2007 6:43 PM

All replies

  • I ran into this problem as well. 

    On a system I wanted to dump an image to, I would run a diskpart performing these actions: select disk 0, clean, create partition primary, assign letter=c:, active, exit and then format c: /q /y. 

     

    After that I booted to PE and ran an imagex /apply from an image located on a server.  Every single time I was getting that same error.  The issue is that the devices and the osdevice in bcdedit is set to unknown (run bcdedit from a working Vista system and one from PE on a non working Vista system and you will see what I mean). 

     

    To resolve the problem, I did these three commands from PE which resolved my problem:

     

     x:\windows\system32\bcdedit /set {default} device partition=c:
     x:\windows\system32\bcdedit /set {default} osdevice partition=c:
     x:\windows\system32\bcdedit /set {bootmgr} device partition=c:

     

    Good luck


     

    Friday, May 25, 2007 6:43 PM
  • I had a windos vista home premium os with problems...
    I reinstaled from cd and get an gray screen saying error (on red letters)...
    After that, i reboot and load vista image from HD.
    It installs perfectly... when reboot's i get an error message: (0xc000000e)!
    Any ideia why?
    Saturday, November 24, 2007 11:05 PM
  •  

    Add the 3 lines below to Alitirs WINPE script after you have restored the image with imagex to solve the problem:

     

    To resolve the problem, I did these three commands from PE which resolved my problem:

     

    bcdedit /set {default} device partition=c:
    bcdedit /set {default} osdevice partition=c:
    bcdedit /set {bootmgr} device partition=c:

     

    Make sure you use the version of bcdedit that works with your version of WinPE.  I copied the Vista RTM bcedit to my WinPE 2.0 script and it worked.

    Thursday, January 17, 2008 6:50 PM
  • I've run this command successfully and everything is working fine now. But is there a way to incorporate this into the winpe image so after i apply the image i dont have to do this each time?

     

    Sunday, May 11, 2008 2:53 PM
  • Wow, it’s finally fixed! Thank you, I no longer have to use the Vista CD to do the repairs. I added these lines of commands suggested to my batch file that is used to deploy images.

     

    Thank you again,

    Brian.

    Monday, May 12, 2008 4:23 AM
  • Can you please let me know how did you run the batch file or incorporate it with win pe cd?

    If possible ca i have the batch file?

     

    Thanks.

     

    Monday, May 12, 2008 6:52 PM
  • Yes, this solution works. Just 2 comments:

     

    1. From within PE, I had run the commands on the C: drive (Vista), not the X: drive. There was no bcdedit command in X:\windows\system32, but I did find it in C:\windows\system32.

     

    2. I have a dual boot setup with Vista on C: and Windows XP on D:, after running the bcdedit commands listed in your post, i was finally able to boot vista, but not Windows XP. A little further digging revealed that I needed to run another bcdedit command: C:\windows\system32\bcdedit /set {ntldr} device partition=c: (note: the ntldr file is on C: drive, even though Windows XP is on D: drive).

     

    Monday, September 15, 2008 4:33 PM
  • Works perfectly for a clone produced by Ghost of Windows Server 2008 RC2. Thanks!!
    Saturday, June 06, 2009 9:51 PM
  • Tedkar,

    You're man

    Very good your answer. Thanks!!!
    Monday, November 30, 2009 7:05 PM
  • Thanks Ted, that did the trick!
    Wednesday, February 17, 2010 5:46 PM
  • Dear All,

    I'm running Active Directory and DNS with one server running with Windows Server 2008 standard 64-bit. I cannot startup. I'm error with C:/windows/system32/winload.exe

    I have try with the following:

     x:\windows\system32\bcdedit /set {default} device partition=c:
     x:\windows\system32\bcdedit /set {default} osdevice partition=c:
     x:\windows\system32\bcdedit /set {bootmgr} device partition=c:

    Message Error as following:

     x:\windows\system32\bcdedit /set {default} device partition=c:

    The boot configuration data store could not be opened.

    The request system device cannot be found.

    Please kindly help me...!

    Best Regard,

    Khemarin

    +85515810187

    Thursday, April 01, 2010 4:45 PM
  • Thanks Tedkar, worked for me as well. I ran into the problem afterI resized a Vmware vmdk and extended it in an other vm. bootloader did not find the disk. i also set it as active and did a fixmbr, fixbootrec without succes but I htink the set osdevice command saved my disk...
    Sunday, April 04, 2010 11:57 AM
  • Hi,

    I got error  message: (0xc000000e)! only If i store the captured image on Network Share and Apply form Network share.

    If I skip the Network share and capture the image into a USB instead of Network share ... and it worked fine without any issue... thats strange , can some have idea why this hhappen on Network share.

    Thursday, June 24, 2010 5:32 PM
  • Hi,

    I got error  message: (0xc000000e)! only If i store the captured image on Network Share and Apply form Network share.

    If I skip the Network share and capture the image into a USB instead of Network share ... and it worked fine without any issue... thats strange , can some have idea why this hhappen on Network share.

    Thursday, June 24, 2010 5:33 PM
  • If the OS is in another partition then c:\ when you boot up PE. Then you have to specify where bcdedit can find the BCD eks:

     

     x:\windows\system32\bcdedit /store d:\boot\bcd /set {default} device partition=c:
     x:\windows\system32\bcdedit /store d:\boot\bcd /set {default} osdevice partition=c:
     x:\windows\system32\bcdedit /store d:\boot\bcd /set {bootmgr} device partition=c:

     

    Friday, July 23, 2010 1:11 AM
  • So heres my first post, woohoo... I was getting the same 0xc000000e error last night on my newly built system. I was freaking out, read all the forums, cried a little...

     

    Took my HDD bays out (antec 1200 case), and found that on my particular MOBO, the 6 Sata connectors (MSI 890FXA-GD70) are so close together that when I put in my Nippon Sata cables, the Sata Cable next to it ends up holding down the "push pin/release notch, etc" of the other making it so terribly loose that you could literally pull it out by blowing on it...Reconnected with a new Sata cable (with no push pin thingy, tech term) and no longer get the boot error. Im ecstatic now... :D So before you do all these RMA's and such, check your connections OBVIOUSLY...

     

    No matter how long you been building computers, its always nice to start from scratch and check the basics. We have a tendency to overlook the basics, because well...we obviously wouldn't make such dumb mistakes now would we? ;)

     

    Thanks again, hope to enjoy the forums :D

    Tuesday, January 11, 2011 3:07 PM
  • Brilliant solution, worked flawlessly. I spent hours reading forums on this error, many pertaining to WinXP. This solution by tekdar worked perfect.
    Friday, January 28, 2011 7:18 AM
  • Dear Mr. Khemarin

    I have run into the same problem, but I guess you have solve this for a long time ago.

    But anyway here is my solution:
    run bcdedit (It will show you that {default} is not the right name for your device.)

    Copy the right name and use it as in this example:

    bcdedit /set {324342-342342-2342-43-234234} device partition c:

    Worked for me, hope someone can use it :-)

    Best Regards

    Haavard

     

    Tuesday, August 16, 2011 9:00 PM
  • thanks GOD my pc is open now. yes! i know what your expirience is now the frustration the worries. i was in the same situation i run around the intenet reading all kinds of post doing all kind of entries, Yes!! a holle ful day melted away to fix that but what a gift after the hard hard hard work and the main thing; the worries that i will lose all my hard work WOW how can some one expirence that ? What do i feel when eventually it open up ? nothing? just the fact that is open

    I can tell you that dond worry and dont reinstall windows just because that problem

    I dont know how it was fixed,nothing has worked and still this stubbburn messege. you are engry on the virus hecker or on you on every one coming your way

    I copy from another computer the file winload.exe and also all that i think has to do with booting and loading i copied it into a uSB disk but I dont know if this was the selution , I typed tuns of time into cmd all the entries intersting maybe i fowlowed here http://support.microsoft.com/kb/927391 or http://neosmart.net/wiki/display/EBCD/Recovering+the+Vista+Bootloader+from+the+DVD

    but its hard to understand how to enter them (i know my english is not good sorry) I dont know what was it but after this hard work i decided to reboot and then try again when i reboot from the CD if you dont have one http://neosmart.net/wiki/display/EBCD/Recovering+the+Vista+Bootloader+from+the+DVD

    and suddenly it cames up up with a messege that windows need to repair the startup which i press OK and then i leave the CD inside and also the USB was conected and I do press a key do boot from the CD and windows is now open

    May be i will have the same problem again i hope no

    try your best eventuelly you will make it

    Tuesday, August 16, 2011 10:09 PM
  • I just experienced this recently and  just ran startup repair on Windows Vista and worked out fine.
    Friday, September 09, 2011 3:30 PM
  • Thanks tedkar ... your solution saved me a lot of hours trying to figure out why the heck winload.exe has gone missing on our Windows Server 2008 after doing a full Acronis backup. Thx!!!

    Tuesday, December 13, 2011 7:14 PM
  • Sorry I posted this as an answer when it's more of a question.

    I'm having a similar issue when I try to image a laptop with a custom windows 7 image I created with ghost.

    Once the image is applied with ghost, and I put the HD in the laptop and start it up, it doesn't boot and says missing or corrupt winload.exe.

    It's easily fixed when I boot win the 7 CD in recover mode and run startup repair.

    BUT

    This will be a pain as I need to image 15 laptops (same hardware) with this image and I don't want to run startup repair everytime. How do I avoid this all together when I'm creating the actual image. Will sysprep make any difference?

    Friday, January 13, 2012 5:01 PM
  • In reply to my own self and to help others, YES sysprep does work and prevent this boot up issue. This is what it's for. It removes any machine specfic information. Make sure to run the "generalize" switch.
    • Proposed as answer by Sharkrit-JOBBO Wednesday, January 18, 2012 3:57 AM
    Friday, January 13, 2012 6:24 PM
  • Backing up & Restoring Windows 7 with ImageX

     

    Problem:  A system with a standard installation of Windows 7 is backed up using ImageX, and when the image is restored, the system won't boot, resulting in this error:

     

    Error: Missing or corrupt winload.exe (0xc000000e) or Status: 0x000000e Info: Windows failed to start, the boot selection failed because a required device is inaccessible.

     

    Pasted from <https://social.technet.microsoft.com/forums/en-US/itprovistadeployment/thread/b26a0560-b3a1-4236-b0de-35065ac38575/>

     

    Background: Unlike when restoring Windows XP images captured with ImageX, where this problem does not occur and this process was simple, boot configuration data components have been modified starting with Windows Vista and Server 2008, resulting in this problem in Windows 7. 

     

    Why was there a change to BCD from Boot.ini?

    BCD was created to provide an improved mechanism for describing boot configuration data. With the development of new firmware models (for example, the Extensible Firmware Interface (EFI)), an extensible and interoperable interface was required to abstract the underlying firmware. This new design provides the foundation for a variety of new features in Windows Vista (for example, the Startup Repair tool and Multi-User Install shortcuts).

     

    Pasted from <http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc721886(WS.10).aspx#BKMK_bcdedit>

     

     

    Error Effect: BCD store configuration pointers (for the Windows Boot Manager and the Windows Boot Loader) to the volume C: partition where Windows is located are shifted to unknown when Windows 7 image is re-applied.

     

    Error Cause: Unknown to me at this time.  I read on the Internet that this problem doesn't happen when one uses ImageX to backup a Windows 7 system that has had Sysprep.exe /generalize run on it.  I verified that this is correct.  In that case, one can simply recreate the partitions/volumes and apply the image back down and Windows 7 boots. 

     

    When one is using ImageX to backup one's in-use Windows 7 Computer, one will have to follow the procedure below to restore the BCD store entries that reference the pointers to avoid this problem.  (Of course, one could avoid all of these problems if one used Windows 7 Backup and selected the option to create a system image.  Windows 7 backup has no problem with

     

    Solution:  Use bcdedit.exe to restore the BCD partition volume pointers.

     

    Procedure Background: When Windows is running, the WinRE partition (in a default installation - has a label of System Reserved) has no volume drive letter and the OS partition where Windows is located has the volume drive letter of C: (the first available drive letter).  When the system is booted into WinPE, temporary volume drive letter assignments are made.  The WinRE partition has the first available volume drive letter of C: assigned to it and the OS partition where Windows is located has the next available volume drive letter of D: assigned to it.

     

    When Windows is running, the Windows Boot Loader ID will be {current}.  This can be seen by typing the bcdedit.exe /enum command, or just bcdedit.exe.  When Windows is not running and the computer is booted into WinPE, the Windows Boot Loader ID will be {default}.

     

    BCD store entries from the perspective within a running Windows 7 system before the backup with ImageX begins:

     

    Windows Boot Manager

    --------------------

    identifier              {bootmgr}

    device                  partition=\Device\HarddiskVolume1

    description             Windows Boot Manager

    locale                  en-US

    inherit                 {globalsettings}

    default                 {default}

    resumeobject            {64100808-4536-11e1-8e6b-bdeea22cecba}

    displayorder            {default}

    toolsdisplayorder       {memdiag}

    timeout                 30

     

    Windows Boot Loader

    -------------------

    identifier              {current}

    device                  partition=C:

    path                    \Windows\system32\winload.exe

    description             Windows 7

    locale                  en-US

    inherit                 {bootloadersettings}

    recoverysequence        {6410080a-4536-11e1-8e6b-bdeea22cecba}

    recoveryenabled         Yes

    osdevice                partition=C:

    systemroot              \Windows

    resumeobject            {64100808-4536-11e1-8e6b-bdeea22cecba}

    nx                      OptIn

     

     

    BCD store entries from the perspective within WinPE before the image is captured:

     

    Windows Boot Manager

    --------------------

    identifier              {bootmgr}

    device                  partition=C:

    description             Windows Boot Manager

    locale                  en-US

    inherit                 {globalsettings}

    default                 {default}

    resumeobject            {64100808-4536-11e1-8e6b-bdeea22cecba}

    displayorder            {default}

    toolsdisplayorder       {memdiag}

    timeout                 30

     

    Windows Boot Loader

    -------------------

    identifier              {default}

    device                  partition=C:

    path                    \Windows\system32\winload.exe

    description             Windows 7

    locale                  en-US

    inherit                 {bootloadersettings}

    recoverysequence        {6410080a-4536-11e1-8e6b-bdeea22cecba}

    recoveryenabled         Yes

    osdevice                partition=C:

    systemroot              \Windows

    resumeobject            {64100808-4536-11e1-8e6b-bdeea22cecba}

    nx                      OptIn

     

     

    Procedure: Using a bootable WinPE USB drive, for example, boot into WinPE & Backup the BCD store:

     

    1. At the WinPE command prompt, type:

     

    BCDedit /export E:\bcd.cfg, where E is the drive letter of the USB drive you booted from.  It's also a good idea, since bcd.cfg is not a text-based file, to type: BCDedit > x:\bcd.txt so that one can refer to it later.

     

    Backup Windows 7 with ImageX

    2. Use ImageX to backup the WinRE system partition and the Windows C: partition:

    ImageX /check /verify /compress maximum /capture C: x:\T410Win7PROx64.wim "WinRE" "Captured by chad k 01-21-2012"

    ImageX /check /verify /compress maximum /append D: x:\T410Win7PROx64.wim "OS" "captured by chad k 01-21-2012"

     

    (Keep in mind that when windows is running the WinRE partition has no volume drive letter, but is assigned C: in the WinPE environment, and that the OS partition volume is assigned to D: in the WinPE environment.  When Windows boots, there is no volume drive letter assigned to the WinRE partition and C: is assigned to the Windows partition volume.)

     

     

    3. Clean the Disk & recreate the partitions before restoring Windows:

               Diskpart

    Select disk 0

    Clean

    Create partition primary size=100

    Select partition 1

    Active

    Format fs=ntfs quick label=WinRE

    Assign letter = C

     

    Create partition primary

    Select partition 2

    Format fs=ntfs quick label=OS

    Assign letter = D

    Exit

     

    Restore Windows 7 with ImageX

    4. Use ImageX to restore windows:

    ImageX /check /verify /apply x:\T410Win7PROx64.wim 1 C:

    ImageX /check /verify /apply x:\T410Win7PROx64.wim 2 D:

    After the images are re-applied to the disk, type bcdedit.exe to see the status of the BCD store.  Notice that now the device and osdevice entries are listed as unknown:

     

     

    BCD store entries from the perspective within WinPE after image is re-applied to the system before the solution is applied:

     

    Windows Boot Manager

    --------------------

    identifier              {bootmgr}

    device                  unknown

    description             Windows Boot Manager

    locale                  en-US

    inherit                 {globalsettings}

    default                 {default}

    resumeobject            {64100808-4536-11e1-8e6b-bdeea22cecba}

    displayorder            {default}

    toolsdisplayorder       {memdiag}

    timeout                 30

     

    Windows Boot Loader

    -------------------

    identifier              {default}

    device                  unknown

    path                    \Windows\system32\winload.exe

    description             Windows 7

    locale                  en-US

    inherit                 {bootloadersettings}

    recoverysequence        {6410080a-4536-11e1-8e6b-bdeea22cecba}

    recoveryenabled         Yes

    osdevice                unknown

    systemroot              \Windows

    resumeobject            {64100808-4536-11e1-8e6b-bdeea22cecba}

    nx                      OptIn

     

    5. Restore BCD partition volume pointers:

    bcdedit /set {default} device partition=c:

    bcdedit /set {default} osdevice partition=c:

    bcdedit /set {bootmgr} device partition=c:

     

    Pasted from <https://social.technet.microsoft.com/forums/en-US/itprovistadeployment/thread/b26a0560-b3a1-4236-b0de-35065ac38575/>

     

     

    Restored BCD store entries from the perspective within WinPE after the image is re-applied to the system and the solution is implemented:

     

    Windows Boot Manager

    --------------------

    identifier              {bootmgr}

    device                  partition=C:

    description             Windows Boot Manager

    locale                  en-US

    inherit                 {globalsettings}

    default                 {default}

    resumeobject            {64100808-4536-11e1-8e6b-bdeea22cecba}

    displayorder            {default}

    toolsdisplayorder       {memdiag}

    timeout                 30

     

    Windows Boot Loader

    -------------------

    identifier              {default}

    device                  partition=C:

    path                    \Windows\system32\winload.exe

    description             Windows 7

    locale                  en-US

    inherit                 {bootloadersettings}

    recoverysequence        {6410080a-4536-11e1-8e6b-bdeea22cecba}

    recoveryenabled         Yes

    osdevice                partition=C:

    systemroot              \Windows

    resumeobject            {64100808-4536-11e1-8e6b-bdeea22cecba}

    nx                      OptIn

     

    Windows 7 should now boot properly.

     

    (Disclaimer: Anything I write is subject to error and incomplete understanding.)



    Tuesday, January 24, 2012 7:27 PM
  • it does boot.  how can I automate that after I apply using ximage or gximage?  is there any script i can run after applying the wim file? like task sequence?

     

    Friday, March 23, 2012 9:55 PM
  • like to know that too.

    I created Boot-Medias via DEPLOYMENT TOOLKIT before but never ran into those problems until now.

    Don't know yet where the problem is.

    But if this could be implemented in the task sequence I'd be glad too.

    Wednesday, April 18, 2012 11:14 AM
  • anyone figured out how to fix this problem yet?

    besides, puttting the command mentioned above every single time after you load the image?

    Is there way to incorporate this into the image?

    so far, /generalize option didn't work with sysprep.  Problem still exist.

    deleting Mounted Devices keys within regedit and recapture, doesn't solve either.

    nothing works so far...  anyone please

    Friday, June 01, 2012 7:38 PM
  • Anyone figured out how to fix this error?

    putting the above commands every single time after dropping the wim image doesn't make sense..

    that might work for 1 or 2 computers but if you have 1000000 of them.. it's kind of hard.

    I tried..

    /generize switch  after putting the commmands above.  no luck

    deleting the keys under hklm\system\mounted devices and recapture. no luck

    anyone.. please help

    Friday, June 01, 2012 8:15 PM
  • Thanks soooooo much on the bcdedit commands, I messed a VM up after resizing the C: somehow and for whatever stupid reason I didn't have a backup so I was freaking out and those commands fixed it!
    Tuesday, June 12, 2012 1:41 PM
  • I ran into this problem as well. 

    On a system I wanted to dump an image to, I would run a diskpart performing these actions: select disk 0, clean, create partition primary, assign letter=c:, active, exit and then format c: /q /y. 

     

    After that I booted to PE and ran an imagex /apply from an image located on a server.  Every single time I was getting that same error.  The issue is that the devices and the osdevice in bcdedit is set to unknown (run bcdedit from a working Vista system and one from PE on a non working Vista system and you will see what I mean). 

     

    To resolve the problem, I did these three commands from PE which resolved my problem:

     

     x:\windows\system32\bcdedit /set {default} device partition=c:
     x:\windows\system32\bcdedit /set {default} osdevice partition=c:
     x:\windows\system32\bcdedit /set {bootmgr} device partition=c:

     

    Good luck


     

    Thanks a lot for the answer! This really helped. However, while this works for a deployment in my office, I am facing the problem in that I need to provide a recovery disc to my customers, and the recovery disc provided also gives this error! I am certainly not able to provide them with this disc. Can anyone assist with this please?

    Thanks!

    Wednesday, July 18, 2012 2:49 AM
  • I suppose the RUN option does not work due to the environment is not booted from C: yet, so the bcdedit command does not recognize the boot system. We are nonetheless still in the PE environment.
    Monday, July 23, 2012 11:21 AM
  • I have a similar issue. I learned very early on you need to run the three bcdedit commands after imaging a PC with Imagex. Otherwise, when Windows starts, you receive the error: "0xc000000e.

    My problem is I setup the flash drives for my associates statewide to reimage our PCs. We were using Patriot Extreme Performance 32GB Xporter XT Boost model PEF32GUSB USB 2.0 to image our PCs. We recently purchased Patriot 32GB Supersonic Boost XT USB Flash Drive model PEF32GSBUSB USB 3.0 flash drives. When I use the USB 3.0 flash drive, the operation works exactly the same until the command file runs the BCDEDIT commands above. When those commands run, I receive the error for each command:

    "The boot configuration data store could not be opened.
     The requested system device cannot be found."

    As a result, when Windows attempts to start I receive the error: 0xc000000e. The boot selection failed because a required device is in inaccessible.

    I am attempting to image a Dell Latitude E5410 with Windows 7 Professional 32-Bit using Win PE 3.1.

    I know something is missing, but I don't know what. I added the chipset drivers to the sources\boot.wim file thinking that might be the problem.

    Any assistance would be greatly appreciated.

    Wednesday, August 01, 2012 6:17 PM
  • Superb Answer!!! This has saved hours of research on BCDEDIT in Windows 7 specially after a new image is created and it is not able to find the Boot Loader. 

    Thanks Tedkar.


    Born to Learn

    Wednesday, March 26, 2014 8:46 AM