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Rebuilding a RAID 1 (Replacing a Drive)

    Question

  • Hi!

    I believe one of my drives is failing and would like to know how I would go about rebuilding my RAID 1 Mirror after pulling and replacing a failing drive. Is it as easy as going into Computer Management and recreating the mirror in the same fashion as I had originally? Please provide Knowledgebase articles as citations if possible as this is crucial data that I am dealing with.

    Regards

    Saturday, May 08, 2010 5:16 PM

Answers

  • On Sat, 8 May 2010 17:16:12 +0000, 183426 wrote:
     
     
    > I believe one of my drives is failing and would like to know how I would go about rebuilding my RAID 1 Mirror after pulling and replacing a failing drive. Is it as easy as going into Computer Management and recreating the mirror in the same fashion as I had originally? Please provide Knowledgebase articles as citations if possible as this is crucial data that I am dealing with.
     
     
     
    I can't answer your question, but if your concern is over crucial data
    that isn't otherwise backed up, let me tell you are making a very
    serious and dangerous mistake.
     
    RAID 1 (mirroring) is *not* a backup solution. RAID 1 uses two or
    more drives, each a duplicate of the others, to provide redundancy,
    not backup. It's used in situations (almost always within
    corporations, not in homes) where any downtown can't be tolerated,
    because the way it works is that if one drive fails the other takes
    over seamlessly. Although some people thing of RAID 1 as a backup
    technique, that is *not* what it is, since it's subject to
    simultaneous loss of the original and the mirror to many of the most
    common dangers threatening your data--severe power glitches, nearby
    lightning strikes, virus attacks, theft of the computer, etc. Most
    companies that use RAID 1 also have a strong external backup plan in
    place.
     
    See "Why RAID is (usually) a Terrible Idea"
    http://www.pugetsystems.com/articles?&id=29
    Ken Blake, Microsoft MVP (Windows Desktop Experience) since 2003
     

    Ken Blake
    Sunday, May 09, 2010 10:11 PM

All replies

  • HI!

     

    How you have the raid configuration? hardware or software?

     

    regards


    I want to be a MVP! | Computer Technician
    Saturday, May 08, 2010 7:06 PM
  • banmenau,

    My motherboard does not have hardware RAID capability and I do not have a RAID card, so I was forced to use Windows 7 software RAID through Computer Management. I have looked into the AMD RAIDXpert software utility, but it seems not to function even though I have the AMD / ATI North / South Bridge drivers installed.

    Regards

    Saturday, May 08, 2010 7:10 PM
  • I would highly recommend that you look into getting a basic RAID card.
    Shouldn't be that much. Using RAID 1 is dangerous. YOU could easily lose
    everything....
     
     
    Regards,
    Hank Arnold
    Microsoft MVP
    Windows Server - Directory Services
    http://it.toolbox.com/blogs/personal-pc-assistant/
     
    On 5/8/2010 3:10 PM, 183426 wrote:
    > banmenau,
    >
    > My motherboard does not have hardware RAID capability and I do not have
    > a RAID card, so I was forced to use Windows 7 software RAID through
    > Computer Management. I have looked into the AMD RAIDXpert software
    > utility, but it seems not to function even though I have the AMD / ATI
    > North / South Bridge drivers installed.
    >
    > Regards
    >
     

    Regards, Hank Arnold (MVP - DS)
    Sunday, May 09, 2010 10:01 AM
  • On Sat, 8 May 2010 17:16:12 +0000, 183426 wrote:
     
     
    > I believe one of my drives is failing and would like to know how I would go about rebuilding my RAID 1 Mirror after pulling and replacing a failing drive. Is it as easy as going into Computer Management and recreating the mirror in the same fashion as I had originally? Please provide Knowledgebase articles as citations if possible as this is crucial data that I am dealing with.
     
     
     
    I can't answer your question, but if your concern is over crucial data
    that isn't otherwise backed up, let me tell you are making a very
    serious and dangerous mistake.
     
    RAID 1 (mirroring) is *not* a backup solution. RAID 1 uses two or
    more drives, each a duplicate of the others, to provide redundancy,
    not backup. It's used in situations (almost always within
    corporations, not in homes) where any downtown can't be tolerated,
    because the way it works is that if one drive fails the other takes
    over seamlessly. Although some people thing of RAID 1 as a backup
    technique, that is *not* what it is, since it's subject to
    simultaneous loss of the original and the mirror to many of the most
    common dangers threatening your data--severe power glitches, nearby
    lightning strikes, virus attacks, theft of the computer, etc. Most
    companies that use RAID 1 also have a strong external backup plan in
    place.
     
    See "Why RAID is (usually) a Terrible Idea"
    http://www.pugetsystems.com/articles?&id=29
    Ken Blake, Microsoft MVP (Windows Desktop Experience) since 2003
     

    Ken Blake
    Sunday, May 09, 2010 10:11 PM