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Vista fails to boot after SP1 install - ntoskrnl.exe 0xc0000098

    Question

  •  

    A few hours ago, I was prompted by Windows Update to update my Vista to SP1. After a long 100% install (Stage 1 to 3) and a couple of reboots during the proccess, It now completely refuses to boot. It's giving me an error at the very start with this info:

     

    ntoskrnl.exe

    Status: 0xc0000098

    Info: Windows failed to load because a required file is missing or corrupt.

     

    Then it suggests using the installation disk to repair the problem, which ofcourse I've tried with no luck (It says it it can't repair the problem, and asks me if i want to send the info to MS).

    I can't even use System Restore from within the repair disk because it says that there are no vaild System Restore points (eventhough I recall it creating a restore point before the installation began). And using the Command Prompt in the repair disk to run "chkdsk /f" didn't do any good.

     

    WHAT THE $#@#! I didn't rush downloading SP1 from MS's download center and waited untill it's officially released to avoid running into beta bugs, but now my doesn't boot AT ALL eventhough this is supposedly the final MS release!! Can ANYONE please shed some light on this issue and tell me how to fix it? (aside from formatting and reinstalling windows which is a ridiculous!)

     

     

    Wednesday, March 19, 2008 9:51 AM

Answers

  •  

    Alright guys, Here's what I did to boot my Windows up again and re-install SP1 (Already confirmed working by other users):

     

    You'll need to manually restore some files again to the version that came with your Windows installation DVD. Use the Windows DVD to boot into repair mode and restore these files using the command prompt:

     

    In your "\Windows\System32\" folder, restore just these files:

    hal.dll

    ntoskrnl.exe (You shouldn't need to replace it because it's not really corrupted.)

    ntkrnlpa.exe (Same as ntoskrnl.exe. Try booting without replacing them first)

     

    And in your "\Windows\System32\Drivers" folder, restore these:

    acpi.sys

    msisadrv.sys

    pci.sys

    volmgr.sys

    volsnap.sys

    disk.sys

     

    Make sure to rename or backup the files you're going to replace (just in case you do something wrong). All the original files you'll need to replace your "corrupted" files with should be found inside the virtually mounted drive (X:\), so they should be in "X:\Windows\System32"\ and "X:\Windows\System32\Drivers\" (you don't need to "expand" any files like the old XP days, you'll just need to use basic "copy" and "rename" commands).

    HINT: If you're not too comfortable using the command prompt, you can use the notepad's file browser to copy and paste files from inside the repair DVD. Just type "notepad.exe" in the command prompt and set the file type to ALL inorder to see non-txt files.(WARNING: It doesn't prompt you when overwriting files and It doesn't show hidden or system files, but you shouldn't need it to anyways)

     

    After it boots successfully you should try to reinstall SP1 again BUT DO NOT USE WINDOWS UPDATE TO REINSTALL IT, DOWNLOAD THE STANDALONE RELEASE. It's highly recommended to reinstall SP1 again because eventhough after you're going to boot, Windows will say that it's removing all SP1 files because the install failed, it actually doestn't replace most of the system files. Your copy is going to be a hybrid between no SP and SP1. When you reinstall SP1, Stage 3 is going to be repeated twice, once before Stage 1 and then again after Stage 2. But that is completely normal.

     

    You should'nt need to restore any other files for you Windows to boot. Don't just replace all the files inside your "System32\Drivers\" folder like what that article said, that will probably do more harm than good. I used the debug boot log file from inside my Windows folder (ntbtlog.txt) to determine which files Windows is using while attempting to boot, and then I checked their file version from inside the repair DVD (right click>properties>details or just leave the mouse pointer on the file for a second); If it was 6.0.6001.18000 (SP1 release version), I replaced it with the old version from my boot DVD.

     

    Good luck guys.

     

     

    IMPORTANT UPDATE:

     

    msisadrv.sys is the correct file name, that was just a typo (edited and corrected). Sorry about that.

     

    Also, I just remembered something; hal.dll did actually give me some trouble because it wasn't in the X: drive. And unfortunatly it's the VERY FIRST file the Windows Loader tries to load at boot so you'll have to get it somehow. You can use the Automatic Repair method (Posted by "Koben Haven" at the very end of the 2nd page) and see if that works for you, but you can also use a USB Flash memory to copy it (make sure it's a pre-SP1 Windows Vista "hal.dll" ) or you can look for it in your Windows folder inside your "winsxs" (ex C:\Windows\Winsxs\) folder (a folder that Vista uses to basicly backup every version of every file ever made for Windows Vista) But it's kinda of tricky because:

    1)The file is deep inside "winsxs" which has TONS of folders and files

    2)The file itself is kinda of tricky to back up because the exact file isn't actually there.

     

    Let me explain:

    If you look inside your "C:\Windows\System32" folder, You will see three files: hal.dll, halacpi.dll, and halmacpi.dll. You will likely see that hal.dll is the same size as one of them. That's because it's exactly the same file just copied and renamed. Basicly if you have a multi-core PC you'll need to use halmacpi.dll and rename it to hal.dll, If you're running a single core PC you need to use halacpi.dll instead. The "winsxs" folder only has these two files and not hal.dll straight up because it kinda depends on the type of processor you're using. So look inside your "winsxs" folder for folders that start with "x86_hal.inf_XXXXXX_6.0.6000.20500_none_XXXXXXX" and you'll find these two files inside along with a "hal.inf" which you won't need to replace (it's inside the "inf" folder in your Windows directory), and then copy whichever one you should use -depending on your processor- to your "C:\Windows\System32\" folder. Now that I think about it, It's probably better if you replace both halacpi.dll and halmacpi.dll inside your System32 folder too (Just to be on the safe side).

    NOTE: You'll probably find two or more folders that start with "x86_hal.inf" in your "winsxs" folder, but make sure:

    1)The folder starts with just "x86_hal.inf" not "x86_hal.inf.resources"

    2)The version number in the folder name is NOT "6.0.6001.18000" because that's SP1 one that causes the problems.

     

     

    Good Luck again!

     

     

     

    Friday, March 21, 2008 1:35 AM

All replies

  • Hi
    I'm French , and i've exactly the same problem !

    if someone know how to fix that mess , please tell us
    Wednesday, March 19, 2008 9:23 PM
  • Wednesday, March 19, 2008 9:48 PM
  •  Carey Frisch wrote:

    Free SP1 technical support directly from Microsoft:

    https://support.microsoft.com/oas/default.aspx?ln=en-us&x=8&y=7&prid=11274&gprid=500921

     

     

    Completly useless. Chat support keeps disconnecting me after asking me to wait for a couple of mins while he does some "research" on the issue. And I'm sure email support will only result in even more frustration since it takes atleast 1 day for them to reply with an answer that's either completely irrelevant, or completely wrong.

     

    Did anyone else have any luck with this issue?

    Wednesday, March 19, 2008 11:40 PM
  • I had SIMILAR problem (ataport.sys was the file I had a problem with but same 0xc0000098 code) and I followed the advice at the following link which seemed to work (sort of, see below):

     

    http://blog.rogercavanagh.com/blog/_archives/2008/2/16/3526136.html

     

    After copying the files as advised in the link, my computer started up and seemed to be continuing with the SP1 install.  It then self-rebooted, but now is hanging on the black screen with Microsoft Corporation in white and the scrolling green bar purporting to reflect some activity.  But the hard drive is not doing anything and I've been in this perpetual state for about 15 minutes already.  I'm afraid to shut it down for fear of causing more problems, but not sure how long I can wait.  Any advice appreciated.

    Thursday, March 20, 2008 4:12 AM
  • That did'nt fix the problem for me i always have the 0xc0000098 screen
    Thursday, March 20, 2008 2:14 PM
  •  

    Alright guys, Here's what I did to boot my Windows up again and re-install SP1 (Already confirmed working by other users):

     

    You'll need to manually restore some files again to the version that came with your Windows installation DVD. Use the Windows DVD to boot into repair mode and restore these files using the command prompt:

     

    In your "\Windows\System32\" folder, restore just these files:

    hal.dll

    ntoskrnl.exe (You shouldn't need to replace it because it's not really corrupted.)

    ntkrnlpa.exe (Same as ntoskrnl.exe. Try booting without replacing them first)

     

    And in your "\Windows\System32\Drivers" folder, restore these:

    acpi.sys

    msisadrv.sys

    pci.sys

    volmgr.sys

    volsnap.sys

    disk.sys

     

    Make sure to rename or backup the files you're going to replace (just in case you do something wrong). All the original files you'll need to replace your "corrupted" files with should be found inside the virtually mounted drive (X:\), so they should be in "X:\Windows\System32"\ and "X:\Windows\System32\Drivers\" (you don't need to "expand" any files like the old XP days, you'll just need to use basic "copy" and "rename" commands).

    HINT: If you're not too comfortable using the command prompt, you can use the notepad's file browser to copy and paste files from inside the repair DVD. Just type "notepad.exe" in the command prompt and set the file type to ALL inorder to see non-txt files.(WARNING: It doesn't prompt you when overwriting files and It doesn't show hidden or system files, but you shouldn't need it to anyways)

     

    After it boots successfully you should try to reinstall SP1 again BUT DO NOT USE WINDOWS UPDATE TO REINSTALL IT, DOWNLOAD THE STANDALONE RELEASE. It's highly recommended to reinstall SP1 again because eventhough after you're going to boot, Windows will say that it's removing all SP1 files because the install failed, it actually doestn't replace most of the system files. Your copy is going to be a hybrid between no SP and SP1. When you reinstall SP1, Stage 3 is going to be repeated twice, once before Stage 1 and then again after Stage 2. But that is completely normal.

     

    You should'nt need to restore any other files for you Windows to boot. Don't just replace all the files inside your "System32\Drivers\" folder like what that article said, that will probably do more harm than good. I used the debug boot log file from inside my Windows folder (ntbtlog.txt) to determine which files Windows is using while attempting to boot, and then I checked their file version from inside the repair DVD (right click>properties>details or just leave the mouse pointer on the file for a second); If it was 6.0.6001.18000 (SP1 release version), I replaced it with the old version from my boot DVD.

     

    Good luck guys.

     

     

    IMPORTANT UPDATE:

     

    msisadrv.sys is the correct file name, that was just a typo (edited and corrected). Sorry about that.

     

    Also, I just remembered something; hal.dll did actually give me some trouble because it wasn't in the X: drive. And unfortunatly it's the VERY FIRST file the Windows Loader tries to load at boot so you'll have to get it somehow. You can use the Automatic Repair method (Posted by "Koben Haven" at the very end of the 2nd page) and see if that works for you, but you can also use a USB Flash memory to copy it (make sure it's a pre-SP1 Windows Vista "hal.dll" ) or you can look for it in your Windows folder inside your "winsxs" (ex C:\Windows\Winsxs\) folder (a folder that Vista uses to basicly backup every version of every file ever made for Windows Vista) But it's kinda of tricky because:

    1)The file is deep inside "winsxs" which has TONS of folders and files

    2)The file itself is kinda of tricky to back up because the exact file isn't actually there.

     

    Let me explain:

    If you look inside your "C:\Windows\System32" folder, You will see three files: hal.dll, halacpi.dll, and halmacpi.dll. You will likely see that hal.dll is the same size as one of them. That's because it's exactly the same file just copied and renamed. Basicly if you have a multi-core PC you'll need to use halmacpi.dll and rename it to hal.dll, If you're running a single core PC you need to use halacpi.dll instead. The "winsxs" folder only has these two files and not hal.dll straight up because it kinda depends on the type of processor you're using. So look inside your "winsxs" folder for folders that start with "x86_hal.inf_XXXXXX_6.0.6000.20500_none_XXXXXXX" and you'll find these two files inside along with a "hal.inf" which you won't need to replace (it's inside the "inf" folder in your Windows directory), and then copy whichever one you should use -depending on your processor- to your "C:\Windows\System32\" folder. Now that I think about it, It's probably better if you replace both halacpi.dll and halmacpi.dll inside your System32 folder too (Just to be on the safe side).

    NOTE: You'll probably find two or more folders that start with "x86_hal.inf" in your "winsxs" folder, but make sure:

    1)The folder starts with just "x86_hal.inf" not "x86_hal.inf.resources"

    2)The version number in the folder name is NOT "6.0.6001.18000" because that's SP1 one that causes the problems.

     

     

    Good Luck again!

     

     

     

    Friday, March 21, 2008 1:35 AM
  •  DiGiTaLLiCa wrote:

     

    Alright guys, Here's what I did to boot my Windows up again and re-install SP1:

     

    You'll need to manually restore some files again to the version that came with your Windows installation DVD. Use the Windows DVD to boot into repair mode and restore these files using the command prompt:

     

    In your "\Windows\System32\" folder, restore just these files:

    hal.dll

    ntoskrnl.exe (You shouldn't need to replace it because it's not really corrupted.)

    ntkrnlpa.exe (Same as ntoskrnl.exe. Try booting without replacing them first)

     

    And in your "\Windows\System32\Drivers" folder, restore these:

    acpi.sys

    msiasdrv.sys

    pci.sys

    volmgr.sys

    volsnap.sys

    disk.sys

     

    Make sure to rename or backup the files you're going to replace (just in case you do something wrong). All the original files you'll need to replace your "corrupted" files with should be found inside the virtually mounted drive (X:\), so they should be in "X:\Windows\System32"\ and "X:\Windows\System32\Drivers\" (you don't need to "expand" any files like the old XP days, you'll just need to use basic "copy" and "rename" commands).

    HINT: If you're not too comfortable using the command prompt, you can use the notepad's file browser to copy and paste files from inside the repair DVD. Just type "notepad.exe" in the command prompt and set the file type to ALL inorder to see non-txt files.(WARNING: It doesn't prompt you when overwriting files and It doesn't show hidden or system files, but you shouldn't need it to anyways)

     

    After it boots successfully you should try to reinstall SP1 again BUT DO NOT USE WINDOWS UPDATE TO REINSTALL IT, DOWNLOAD THE STANDALONE RELEASE. It's highly recommended to reinstall SP1 again because eventhough after you're going to boot, Windows will say that it's removing all SP1 files because the install failed, it actually doestn't replace most of the system files. Your copy is going to be a hybrid between no SP and SP1. When you reinstall SP1, Stage 3 is going to be repeated twice, once before Stage 1 and then again after Stage 2. But that is completely normal.

     

    You should'nt need to restore any other files for you Windows to boot. Don't just replace all the files inside your "System32\Drivers\" folder like what that article said, that will probably do more harm than good. I used the debug boot log file from inside my Windows folder (ntbtlog.txt) to determine which files Windows is using while attempting to boot, and then I checked their file version from inside the repair DVD (right click>properties>details or just leave the mouse pointer on the file for a second); If it was 6.0.6001.18000 (SP1 release version), I replaced it with the old version from my boot DVD.

     

    Good luck guys.


    It's a shame that people have to go through this in order to install the service pack.Vista reminds me of windows ME.I have a copy of vista and I am afraid to install it,think I'll stick with XP SP3.
    Friday, March 21, 2008 2:24 AM
  • I agree!!! What the "HECK"...    I don't recall downloading SP1, but I had the SAME error.  It happened on Easter Sunday..   What fun!!  Nothing like going to church and hearing about the resurection and getting to come home and perfom it on a computer.  <Note>   I had to REFRESH (reformat-reload) my 20 day old DELL and re-install all the darn programs... Not to mention the loss of 20 days of E-mail....

     

      I know that I created a restore point the previous evening and calling Dell Support is less then useless (For all that have had this unique advendure... I think enough is said)...    If anyone has a way of fixing this without reformating/reinstalling, please let me know..

     

     

    Thanks,

     

    Gegeneis

    Tuesday, March 25, 2008 1:16 AM
  •  Gegeneis wrote:

    If anyone has a way of fixing this without reformating/reinstalling, please let me know..

     

     

    Thanks,

     

    Gegeneis

     

    Check my previous post; It's all in there.

    Tuesday, March 25, 2008 9:08 AM
  • I'm sick of this ***.

    I couldn't even boot with the dvd, I got the error screen before I came in to the installation screen.

    And now I have formated my harddrive on another pc using winXP and tried to install vista to it again on my pc but I still get that message!

    I dont even have a friggin windows on my harddrive and I still get that darn error message. But it all runs smoothely on the other pc I've got.

     

    I guess my pc is pretty much f***** up now, and I dont have a single clue what to do about it.

     

    Thanks Microsoft for making me loose some important files.

    Friday, March 28, 2008 3:22 PM
  •  speccan wrote:

    I'm sick of this ***.

    I couldn't even boot with the dvd, I got the error screen before I came in to the installation screen.

     

     

    You probably need to set you PC's BIOS to boot from the DVD Drive first. This can only happen if your PC is set to boot from the HD first, or your Windows DVD or DVD Drive is F"d up.

    Friday, March 28, 2008 3:43 PM
  •  DiGiTaLLiCa wrote:
     speccan wrote:

    I'm sick of this ***.

    I couldn't even boot with the dvd, I got the error screen before I came in to the installation screen.

     

     

    You probably need to set you PC's BIOS to boot from the DVD Drive first. This can only happen if your PC is set to boot from the HD first, or your Windows DVD or DVD Drive is F"d up.

     

    I have put it to boot from the dvd first. And I get the message "Press any button to start...". But when the windows files have loaded it still gets the same.

    And the dvd works on my other computer so it's not broken.

    Friday, March 28, 2008 4:08 PM
  • Speccan,

     

    This may not be the problem you have encountered, but there are times when a particular DVD drive will have trouble reading boot media.  When the DVD works in another system, especially if the DVD drive is a different brand, that can be an indicator.

     

    Recently, when setting up a system with a new OS, the DVD boot media would not spin up properly and initial boot failed over and over. After checking the boot media in another system, it worked correctly. So i removed the Sony DVD-RW drive from the offending system and replaced with a better Plextor SATA DVD-RW. Then the machine booted and loaded the OS. It was just a fluke since the DVD-RW boot media had been prepared using another identical Sony DVD-RW in another system. Now that defective Sony DVD-RW drive is going back for warranty replacement.

     

    --ilv

     

    Sunday, March 30, 2008 5:37 AM
  •  Mark-ilv wrote:

    Speccan,

     

    This may not be the problem you have encountered, but there are times when a particular DVD drive will have trouble reading boot media.  When the DVD works in another system, especially if the DVD drive is a different brand, that can be an indicator.

     

    Recently, when setting up a system with a new OS, the DVD boot media would not spin up properly and initial boot failed over and over. After checking the boot media in another system, it worked correctly. So i removed the Sony DVD-RW drive from the offending system and replaced with a better Plextor SATA DVD-RW. Then the machine booted and loaded the OS. It was just a fluke since the DVD-RW boot media had been prepared using another identical Sony DVD-RW in another system. Now that defective Sony DVD-RW drive is going back for warranty replacement.

     

    --ilv

     

     

    Okay I can try to use an other DVD drive and test again.

    But I doubt it. I explained the problem to a friend of mine who works with computers, he was quite sure that it was the memories in my PC that had broke down.

    But it's always worth a try. I use a DVD writer as my disc reader so maybe it's better to use the other "normal" dvd drive, so to say.
    Sunday, March 30, 2008 10:49 AM
  • Which blue screen do you get from the dvd ? Is it a clfs.sys error (PAGE_FAULT_IN_NONPAGED_AREA) ? If so you have the same problem as me since I installed service pack one, the ntoskrnl.exe error when trying to boot from the harddisk and the clfs.sys bsod when trying to boot from the vista install dvd.
    I am pretty sure it is not a hardware problem, the service pack corrupted the harddisk bootsector, which is read by the vista install dvd and prevents it to run. If I unplug my sata harddrive on which the vista installation is my vista dvd runs well, but this is useless as I want to recover the system which is on the unplugged disk...
    I tried running the ubuntu live cd I had downloaded a while ago as it has a working ubuntu version on it, with no installation needed. I could access the sata disk and everything it contains, which seems to prove the disk which prevents the vista dvd from loading in itself is not corrupt. Unfortunately Ubuntu opens ntfs partitions in read only mode so I couldn't do any tests.
    After some research on the web about this issue, a $TxfLog is apparently involved and if this particular file is corrupted on the bootdisk then the vista dvd won't run... And this file is hidden from all windows versions.
    I think this has nothing to do with memory or disk hardware problems, some people have sent their computers for reparation to their manufacturer and got it back working with the same hardware but a freshly formatted disk.
    I found a thread where somebody says a software fixed his disk : Vistabootpro which can be found here http://www.pronetworks.org/forum/album_cat.php?cat_id=69
    Unfortunately this software needs... windows, so for me it's no use.
    I haven't found a solution yet, but what I'm sure of is :
    - Windows was stable on my computer before service pack one
    - My vista installation dvd worked
    on my computer before service pack one
    - It is not a sata driver problem and has something to do with the boot sector of my harddisk, as my dvd writer is sata, and the vista installation dvd works fine if I unplug the Sata disk on which my system is installed.
    - My sata harddisk is only one year old and it is not broken as I can see all of it's content from Ubuntu.
    As I have been advised by a Microsoft employee on this forum I am going to send them a support request but I've got some doubts...
    Sunday, March 30, 2008 12:53 PM
  •  Briac Pollier wrote:
    Which blue screen do you get from the dvd ? Is it a clfs.sys error (PAGE_FAULT_IN_NONPAGED_AREA) ? If so you have the same problem as me since I installed service pack one, the ntoskrnl.exe error when trying to boot from the harddisk and the clfs.sys bsod when trying to boot from the vista install dvd.
    I am pretty sure it is not a hardware problem, the service pack corrupted the harddisk bootsector, which is read by the vista install dvd and prevents it to run. If I unplug my sata harddrive on which the vista installation is my vista dvd runs well, but this is useless as I want to recover the system which is on the unplugged disk...
    I tried running the ubuntu live cd I had downloaded a while ago as it has a working ubuntu version on it, with no installation needed. I could access the sata disk and everything it contains, which seems to prove the disk which prevents the vista dvd from loading in itself is not corrupt. Unfortunately Ubuntu opens ntfs partitions in read only mode so I couldn't do any tests.
    After some research on the web about this issue, a $TxfLog is apparently involved and if this particular file is corrupted on the bootdisk then the vista dvd won't run... And this file is hidden from all windows versions.
    I think this has nothing to do with memory or disk hardware problems, some people have sent their computers for reparation to their manufacturer and got it back working with the same hardware but a freshly formatted disk.
    I found a thread where somebody says a software fixed his disk : Vistabootpro which can be found here http://www.pronetworks.org/forum/album_cat.php?cat_id=69
    Unfortunately this software needs... windows, so for me it's no use.
    I haven't found a solution yet, but what I'm sure of is :
    - Windows was stable on my computer before service pack one
    - My vista installation dvd worked
    on my computer before service pack one
    - It is not a sata driver problem and has something to do with the boot sector of my harddisk, as my dvd writer is sata, and the vista installation dvd works fine if I unplug the Sata disk on which my system is installed.
    - My sata harddisk is only one year old and it is not broken as I can see all of it's content from Ubuntu.
    As I have been advised by a Microsoft employee on this forum I am going to send them a support request but I've got some doubts...

     

    I get the ntoskrnl.exe and volmgr.sys error when I try to start up and to start with the Vista dvd.

    I have formatted my disk on another PC using winXP, and it works to boot from the dvd on that PC and it also worked when Vista still was on the disk. No errors or nothing.

    But the minute I plugged it in my PC it just wouldn't work.

    I can boot with winXP but as said before, I cant install it because I keep getting bsod.

    I have also installed Vista on it again on the other PC I've got and I have been testing it if it works fine and it did. But since I have to reinstall Vista when I put it in my PC (because of different components which results in a bsod). And I still have the same problem, I cant boot. Get either the Volmgr.sys error or ntoskrnl.exe error.

    So there has to be some hardware error? I mean, my disk is completely clean. I haven't tried to use another disk because I dont want to fromat them since I got some things on them I wanna keep.

    But I mean, why wouldn't it work to boot with the dvd even if the disk is formatted? That's pretty weird.

    Monday, March 31, 2008 12:42 PM
  • That is pretty werid alright, but there's a good chance that it's a memory failure issue. Try running the memory diagnostics tool in the boot menu and let it check your ram to 100%. If you can't even boot memdiag from the boot menu and If you have two sticks of RAM or more remove one and try to boot from the DVD again, if it doesn't work remove the other one and put the first one back in and try again...etc

     

    If you formatted your hard disk and your hardware is 100% working (no bad ram or bad HD) your Vista DVD should boot without any problems. Booting from the DVD doesn't even load anything to your HD untill you actually start the installation process (all the files that it tries to load at boot from the DVD are loaded to the RAM, just like a LiveCD). You can boot the installation DVD without any HD connected if you don't belive this.

     

     

    Monday, March 31, 2008 1:12 PM
  • Well, the boot sector of a disk can in fact make Vista BSoD, even if it is formatted, and even if there is no hardware failure. That is the error I am getting, but I don't think it's the same as yours, as from the Vista DVD it gives me a clfs.sys error. Howevever, I do get a ntoskrnl error too when I try to boot from the hardddisk.
    The best way to check for me was to put the vista system disk on another computer with a usb2 cradle : result on a vista machine instant crash as soon as plugged in
    But no problem with XP, I could check my disk with scandisk and see there was no error on it...
    This way I know it comes from the disk, and that the disk is not faulty, there is just something written on it which vista doesn't like...

    If you think it is a memory issue, have you tried the memory test you can do on startup (where you can chose normal windows boot, sabfe mode, etc.) ? This would be a quick way to see your memory is faulty or not... I guess faulty memory would not pass the test...
    Monday, March 31, 2008 1:29 PM
  •  Briac Pollier wrote:
    Well, the boot sector of a disk can in fact make Vista BSoD, even if it is formatted, and even if there is no hardware failure. That is the error I am getting, but I don't think it's the same as yours, as from the Vista DVD it gives me a clfs.sys error. Howevever, I do get a ntoskrnl error too when I try to boot from the hardddisk.
    The best way to check for me was to put the vista system disk on another computer with a usb2 cradle : result on a vista machine instant crash as soon as plugged in
    But no problem with XP, I could check my disk with scandisk and see there was no error on it...
    This way I know it comes from the disk, and that the disk is not faulty, there is just something written on it which vista doesn't like...

    If you think it is a memory issue, have you tried the memory test you can do on startup (where you can chose normal windows boot, sabfe mode, etc.) ? This would be a quick way to see your memory is faulty or not... I guess faulty memory would not pass the test...

     

    Thanks for this mate!
    Testing with just 1 of the memories never came to my mind. But it helped! It appears that one of them isn't working. I've just installed Vista again and everything works fine! Have to get a new memory on my warranty.

    Cheers mate! And thanks!

    Also, thanks to every1 else who tried to help, I really appreciate it!

    Monday, March 31, 2008 9:21 PM
  •  speccan wrote:

     

    Thanks for this mate!
    Testing with just 1 of the memories never came to my mind. But it helped! It appears that one of them isn't working. I've just installed Vista again and everything works fine! Have to get a new memory on my warranty.

    Cheers mate! And thanks!

    Also, thanks to every1 else who tried to help, I really appreciate it!

     

    Glad it worked, It was pretty clear that it's a memory failure issue after you said that you've formatted your HD and it also didn't boot.

    Tuesday, April 01, 2008 12:59 AM
  •  

    Ok,

        So same thing happened to me... I am unable to boot.

     

    I went into the BIOS and booted from the disk drive.

    I was able to boot from the DVD

    ALTHOUGH

    When I boot normally... and ya know get the error message... If I am to attempt to boot in safe-mode with Command Promt... I get the original error message and a cycle is created.

     

    Is there a way to boot from the DVD, and acces Command Prompt without reformating my hard-drive and reinstalling vista.

     

    I don't know if people are still focusing on this problem... but if you do have any suggestions/ideas/advice (all will be greatly appriciated) it would be great if you could offer them up ASAP.

     

    thanks

    Thursday, April 10, 2008 4:20 AM
  • What is the error message you get when *attempting to* boot from the DVD ?

    A ntoskrnl.exe error ? A clfs.sys error ? Something else ?

    How many harddisks do you have ?

    Is your hardware the same as when windows was first installed ?

     

    If you have two harddisks I would suggest you unplugged (or switched off in the bios) the one on which windows is installed, and see if the installation DVD works this way. If it doesn't, you will know your problem does not come from your windows installation.

     

    If it does, you will have to install Windows on the other disk, get back your data on the faulty windows installation from another computer (or usb craddle), and format the disk.

     

    If you have changed your hardware since your first windows installation, maybe the problem with your windows DVD comes from there.

     

    I have changed my IDE DVD writer for a SATA one. The new writer was working perfectly on a fully installed Vista with all the drivers. But then something went wrong during SP1 install, it seemed to install completely but when the computer restarted I got the ntoskrnl.exe error which prevented me from booting Windows.

    I was able to boot up from the DVD the first time, but windows setup doesn't correctly recognise my dvd writer for some reason or another, and I guess that's the reason why my windows installation was corrupted when attempting a windows restoration. I was warned that the restoration had failed, and when I restarted the windows DVD didn't boot anymore, I got the clfs.sys error.

    I unplugged the disk on which windows was and booted from the DVD. It worked, but when I tried a new windows installation it got corrupted, and I got a message saying installation had failed and I had to start again.

    I tried again and got the same error.

     

    I changed back to my former DVD writer, and then installation worked correctly until the end, I installed Service Pack one before installing any drivers on my fresh windows installation.

    I tried booting from the new windows installation but with my former windows disk plugged in, and I got the same clfs.sys error as I got when booting from the dvd with this disk plugged in, so the only way I found to get it work was to plug it as an external harddisk with an e-sata / usb2 craddle after windows boot up, get my files back, format it, and put it back in my computer.

    I now have a fully working Vista system again, with all drivers installed, my two hardisks and my new sata dvd writer, my ide dvd writer back in a cupboard, but now I know I still need it if I have to use the Vista DVD...

     

    Hope this helps.

    I don't know if your case is similar, though...

    Thursday, April 10, 2008 8:38 PM
  •  Briac Pollier wrote:

    What is the error message you get when *attempting to* boot from the DVD ?

    A ntoskrnl.exe error ? A clfs.sys error ? Something else ?

    How many harddisks do you have ?

    Is your hardware the same as when windows was first installed ?

     

    If you have two harddisks I would suggest you unplugged (or switched off in the bios) the one on which windows is installed, and see if the installation DVD works this way. If it doesn't, you will know your problem does not come from your windows installation.

     

    If it does, you will have to install Windows on the other disk, get back your data on the faulty windows installation from another computer (or usb craddle), and format the disk.

     

    If you have changed your hardware since your first windows installation, maybe the problem with your windows DVD comes from there.

     

    I have changed my IDE DVD writer for a SATA one. The new writer was working perfectly on a fully installed Vista with all the drivers. But then something went wrong during SP1 install, it seemed to install completely but when the computer restarted I got the ntoskrnl.exe error which prevented me from booting Windows.

    I was able to boot up from the DVD the first time, but windows setup doesn't correctly recognise my dvd writer for some reason or another, and I guess that's the reason why my windows installation was corrupted when attempting a windows restoration. I was warned that the restoration had failed, and when I restarted the windows DVD didn't boot anymore, I got the clfs.sys error.

    I unplugged the disk on which windows was and booted from the DVD. It worked, but when I tried a new windows installation it got corrupted, and I got a message saying installation had failed and I had to start again.

    I tried again and got the same error.

     

    I changed back to my former DVD writer, and then installation worked correctly until the end, I installed Service Pack one before installing any drivers on my fresh windows installation.

    I tried booting from the new windows installation but with my former windows disk plugged in, and I got the same clfs.sys error as I got when booting from the dvd with this disk plugged in, so the only way I found to get it work was to plug it as an external harddisk with an e-sata / usb2 craddle after windows boot up, get my files back, format it, and put it back in my computer.

    I now have a fully working Vista system again, with all drivers installed, my two hardisks and my new sata dvd writer, my ide dvd writer back in a cupboard, but now I know I still need it if I have to use the Vista DVD...

     

    Hope this helps.

    I don't know if your case is similar, though...

     

    Thankyou for responding so quickly.

          No, I haven't changed/updated/added to my hardware. (And I only have one hard-drive)

    The error message is the same as was observed in the first post:

    ntoskrnl.exe

    Status:0x0000098

    Info: Windows failed to load becuase a required file is missing or corrupt.

     

    I was able to boot from the DVD... after an embarrassing discovery that I just needed to restart and press any key (if I don't restart after setting the boot sequence... it just does that circle thing... where it still tries to load form the hard-disk.)

    After this... I am afraid that I am making some other silly mistake elsewhere.

     

    Once I do boot from the disk, and click next... what do I do then. I really don't want to have to reinstall Vista again. I am pretty sure I can load the files from the DVD from cmd prompt... my only problem is getting there.

     

    Does anybody know how to get to command prompt after booting form the DVD? Is there another way to get to command prompt? Or, is there another way to restore these files?

     

     

    Thursday, April 10, 2008 11:01 PM
  • You don't need to install Vista again if your DVD works.

    On the DVD you have the choice between an installation and a repair mode. If the repair mode works correctly, it will find your windows partition, and try to restore it.

    If that fails (if the windows partition is not found), you get to a screen with some program icons, one of them being the dos prompt, but it is not the first step.

    Friday, April 11, 2008 5:41 AM
  • thankyou. I found the cmd prompt.

    I was abel to copy all files exept for 'hal.dll'

    So, I rebooted and experimented.

    I entered the BIOS, and turned on 'drive lock' for some reason, after I took out the Vista DVD and rebooted, I was able to access Vista just fine.

    I then rebooted again, and found that my hard drive was no longer being recognized.

    I turned off 'drive lock' in my BIOS settings... and still my hard-drive is not being recognized.

    What do I do now?

    I suppose I could plug my drive in as a slave to a desktop and then format the drive... but I don't want to lose my school files.

    thanks again Briac. Do you think you could still help me?
    Friday, April 11, 2008 3:42 PM
  • unfortunately i have had the same thing happen to my system.  so after reading all the thread i could i started to replace my dll and sys files as sated earlier.  I replaced one ata  time tried restarting and replaceing the file that had the error. the last file i replaced was ataport.sys.   and now i can get windows to begin to load(green bar at bottom) thenn the system just restarts and no specific error.  I replaced Hal.dll with  halmacpi.dll   should i try halacpi.dll?

      ps

    the useless windows repair would not work ethier

    Wednesday, April 16, 2008 9:07 PM
  •  

    Sorry,

       I can't help you. it sounds like you got farther than me. Maybe you could help me. What command is used to replace files on the C: drive with files from the virutal X: drive (or the D: drive, I don't know which one I am supposed to use) to the C: drive.

    Fatigued.Nerd

    Thursday, April 17, 2008 12:10 AM
  • I tried the solution suggested (had to get hal.dll  from another pre-sp1 computer) and pC booted up resuming SP1 installation at stage 3; its been running for about an hour configuring updates.  Will let you know if its succesful.

    Sunday, June 15, 2008 2:35 PM
  •  Mark Scanel wrote:

    unfortunately i have had the same thing happen to my system.  so after reading all the thread i could i started to replace my dll and sys files as sated earlier.  I replaced one ata  time tried restarting and replaceing the file that had the error. the last file i replaced was ataport.sys.   and now i can get windows to begin to load(green bar at bottom) thenn the system just restarts and no specific error.  I replaced Hal.dll with  halmacpi.dll   should i try halacpi.dll?

      ps

    the useless windows repair would not work ethier

     

    Trust me, if you want it to boot again you have to replace all the files I listed. Some files will not give you boot errors but not replacing them will cause the system to be unstable (more than it already is) or not boot at all. I did the exact thing you did and had the exact same issue, that's when I knew that there must be other files that caused the crash at boot (mainly Hal.dll and  halmacpi.dll/halacpi.dll)

     

    Good luck

    Sunday, June 15, 2008 2:42 PM
  • Wat happens if we dont have the dvd?
    Wednesday, June 18, 2008 4:30 PM
  • This is directed at DiGiTaLLiCa:

    Where is hal.dll? I have read all of your posts and I can't seem to find the file. Can you give me more specific instructions on where to find hal.dll?

    Thanks
    Monday, August 11, 2008 8:08 PM
  •  

    Ok I have done this and it works gets me into vista just fine but next restart and guess what the servuce pacvk tries to reinstall starting from step 1 again and the same result. I have disconnected from the internet and tried installing from the full sp1 pack I downloaded and same thing. So I thought I would get clever and install the sp1 block tool from Microsoft but £(^% as soon as I reconnect to the router the pack redownloads and tries to reinstall at reboot. I know I could turn off all auto updates but that is not a lomgterm solution. Any help would be very very welcome.
    Wednesday, September 10, 2008 2:30 PM
  • Hi all,

    Could you please help? I am facing the same ntoskrnl.exe and 0xc0000098 problem. I've done what digitalica suggested but I'm still on the black screen. What else I can do?

    Hope you can advice.

    Thanks,

    -Vicky

    Sunday, November 02, 2008 1:18 PM
  • Hi, I have been having the same ntoskernel.exe 0xc0000098 error.

     

    Thing is, I got it without installing SP1 (it came with the DVD). The computer ran fine for a week without any problem whatsoever and then suddenly did that to me. So I repaired it with the Vista DVD and suprisingly it worked, but then it did it again today (2 days later). This sin't because I rebooted as the computer was closed and reopened 2 times before the error reapeared. I succeeded in repairing the error and booting on Vista again but since this is the second time it happens I'm guessing it's not going to stop now.

     

    I'm wondering if I have to replace hal.dll, halmacpi.dll, halacpi.dll and all the drivers in order to make it work properly or does this not apply since it occured without me trying to update to SP1?

    Friday, November 28, 2008 6:10 PM
  •  Seraphim Knight wrote:

    Hi, I have been having the same ntoskernel.exe 0xc0000098 error.

     

    Thing is, I got it without installing SP1 (it came with the DVD). The computer ran fine for a week without any problem whatsoever and then suddenly did that to me. So I repaired it with the Vista DVD and suprisingly it worked, but then it did it again today (2 days later). This sin't because I rebooted as the computer was closed and reopened 2 times before the error reapeared. I succeeded in repairing the error and booting on Vista again but since this is the second time it happens I'm guessing it's not going to stop now.

     

    I'm wondering if I have to replace hal.dll, halmacpi.dll, halacpi.dll and all the drivers in order to make it work properly or does this not apply since it occured without me trying to update to SP1?

     

    I don't think this solution applies to your problem, But it MIGHT work if the corrupted file(s) in your PC is one of the files listed here (to be replaced).

    Friday, November 28, 2008 8:05 PM
  •  DiGiTaLLiCa wrote:
    I don't think this solution applies to your problem, But it MIGHT work if the corrupted file(s) in your PC is one of the files listed here (to be replaced).

     

    I have tried and with no success. Now it has been doing this to me for a week... It's not that bad since it doesn't disable me from accessing the computer, but I have to do a fixboot with the vista dvd every morning, and having to do that keeps someone from working on it in the morning when Im no there.

     

    Is there something I can do?

    Thursday, December 11, 2008 6:35 PM
  • Nice one to cut and paste other peoples work without referencing it or even saying it aint your own! (unless it is your own - in which case here is either a free plug for your site or the details of someone robbing your posts)

    http://www.windowsreference.com/windows-vista/fix-for-ntoskrnlexe-missing-or-corrupt-error-0x0000098-when-booting-up-vista/
    Saturday, March 28, 2009 12:15 AM
  • hi,
    thanks a ton for the update that you had given. I used it. Apart from the files that you had mentioned it also asked me for other files, which i copied from the X drive. The problem is still the windows does not boot. I used the HDD as a slave on othe computer. I could pull out most of my data, but the desktop folder is missing. I wanted to copy the data so I made it a slave and copied most of my data. Only problem is the document and the desktop folder is missing.

    Is there any way  I can boot the sytem and/or get the missing data without having to reinstall the windows vista.

    Million thanks in advance..

    Rgds
    Gaurav Narula
    Thursday, April 02, 2009 1:10 PM
  • Hi

    I work as an IT-Technician and have encountered this problem on a few computers. I have found a solution which has worked for me so far so perhaps they can also help you guys. This solution is used for clean installation of Vista. What I do is change the harddrivres SATA mode in BIOS to IDE. So simply boot the computer and then enter bios. Here you should be able to find the SATA mode option. On some computers you can also select the option called Legacy Mode which also seems to work. So set it to IDE or Legacy. Then I run the Vista dvd and when I have to select where to install it I select advanced options. Here I part the harddrive into 2 partitions of roughly the same size and format both. I select the first (top one) for the Vista installation drive. When finished and Vista is installed the computers I have used this on all have started without problems. So its a fix when doing a clean install but if you are just upgrading to SP1 then I dont think this method will work.

    Regards

    René Schmidt
    Tuesday, April 21, 2009 4:59 PM
  • Hi,

    I have the same problem, vista is asking me for the ntoskrnl.exe.

    I've followed the instructions of DiGiTaLLiCa   by replacing the files he noticed and now i've a fatal error C210000a with the BSOD :-( :

    C000021a (fatal system error)
    The session manager initialization system process terminated unexpectedly with a status of 0xc000000D (0x00000000, 0x00000000)



    Could somebody help me???

    pleeeease


    Monday, May 04, 2009 12:57 PM
  • Hi.

     

    Try to perform a manual system restore to fix the issue.

     

     

    ·         Boot from Vista DVD

    ·         Get in to WINRE

    ·         Open command prompt

    ·         Enter the following commands to create a Manual System Restore to fix the issue.

    C:

    cd windows\system32\config

    C:\windows\system32\config>ren default default.old

    C:\windows\system32\config>ren sam sam.old

    C:\windows\system32\config>ren security security.old

    C:\windows\system32\config>ren software software.old

    C:\windows\system32\config>ren system system.old

     

    C:\windows\system32\config>cd regback

     

    C:\windows\system32\config\regback>copy default c:\windows\system32\config

    C:\windows\system32\config\regback>copy sam c:\windows\system32\config

    C:\windows\system32\config\regback>copy security c:\windows\system32\config

    C:\windows\system32\config\regback>copy software c:\windows\system32\config

    C:\windows\system32\config\regback>copy system c:\windows\system32\config

     

     

    Restart the computer manually.

     

    The computer will boot J


    NB: I do see that while trying a manual system restore  there might be a chance a small data loss. So please try at your own risk.


    Arun
    • Edited by Mike_jane Friday, June 05, 2009 8:40 PM Updated
    Tuesday, May 26, 2009 12:03 AM
  •  

    Alright guys, Here's what I did to boot my Windows up again and re-install SP1 (Already confirmed working by other users):

     

    You'll need to manually restore some files again to the version that came with your Windows installation DVD. Use the Windows DVD to boot into repair mode and restore these files using the command prompt:

     

    In your "\Windows\System32\" folder, restore just these files:

    hal.dll

    ntoskrnl.exe (You shouldn't need to replace it because it's not really corrupted.)

    ntkrnlpa.exe (Same as ntoskrnl.exe. Try booting without replacing them first)

     

    And in your "\Windows\System32\Drivers" folder, restore these:

    acpi.sys

    msisadrv.sys

    pci.sys

    volmgr.sys

    volsnap.sys

    disk.sys

     

    Make sure to rename or backup the files you're going to replace (just in case you do something wrong). All the original files you'll need to replace your "corrupted" files with should be found inside the virtually mounted drive (X:\), so they should be in "X:\Windows\System32"\ and "X:\Windows\System32\Drivers\" (you don't need to "expand" any files like the old XP days, you'll just need to use basic "copy" and "rename" commands).

    HINT: If you're not too comfortable using the command prompt, you can use the notepad's file browser to copy and paste files from inside the repair DVD. Just type "notepad.exe" in the command prompt and set the file type to ALL inorder to see non-txt files.(WARNING: It doesn't prompt you when overwriting files and It doesn't show hidden or system files, but you shouldn't need it to anyways)

     

    After it boots successfully you should try to reinstall SP1 again BUT DO NOT USE WINDOWS UPDATE TO REINSTALL IT, DOWNLOAD THE STANDALONE RELEASE. It's highly recommended to reinstall SP1 again because eventhough after you're going to boot, Windows will say that it's removing all SP1 files because the install failed, it actually doestn't replace most of the system files. Your copy is going to be a hybrid between no SP and SP1. When you reinstall SP1, Stage 3 is going to be repeated twice, once before Stage 1 and then again after Stage 2. But that is completely normal.

     

    You should'nt need to restore any other files for you Windows to boot. Don't just replace all the files inside your "System32\Drivers\" folder like what that article said, that will probably do more harm than good. I used the debug boot log file from inside my Windows folder (ntbtlog.txt) to determine which files Windows is using while attempting to boot, and then I checked their file version from inside the repair DVD (right click>properties>details or just leave the mouse pointer on the file for a second); If it was 6.0.6001.18000 (SP1 release version), I replaced it with the old version from my boot DVD.

     

    Good luck guys.

     

     

    IMPORTANT UPDATE:

     

    msisadrv.sys is the correct file name, that was just a typo (edited and corrected). Sorry about that.

     

    Also, I just remembered something; hal.dll did actually give me some trouble because it wasn't in the X: drive. And unfortunatly it's the VERY FIRST file the Windows Loader tries to load at boot so you'll have to get it somehow. You can use the Automatic Repair method (Posted by "Koben Haven" at the very end of the 2nd page) and see if that works for you, but you can also use a USB Flash memory to copy it (make sure it's a pre-SP1 Windows Vista "hal.dll" ) or you can look for it in your Windows folder inside your "winsxs" (ex C:\Windows\Winsxs\) folder (a folder that Vista uses to basicly backup every version of every file ever made for Windows Vista) But it's kinda of tricky because:

    1)The file is deep inside "winsxs" which has TONS of folders and files

    2)The file itself is kinda of tricky to back up because the exact file isn't actually there.

     

    Let me explain:

    If you look inside your "C:\Windows\System32" folder, You will see three files: hal.dll, halacpi.dll, and halmacpi.dll. You will likely see that hal.dll is the same size as one of them. That's because it's exactly the same file just copied and renamed. Basicly if you have a multi-core PC you'll need to use halmacpi.dll and rename it to hal.dll, If you're running a single core PC you need to use halacpi.dll instead. The "winsxs" folder only has these two files and not hal.dll straight up because it kinda depends on the type of processor you're using. So look inside your "winsxs" folder for folders that start with "x86_hal.inf_XXXXXX_6.0.6000.20500_none_XXXXXXX" and you'll find these two files inside along with a "hal.inf" which you won't need to replace (it's inside the "inf" folder in your Windows directory), and then copy whichever one you should use -depending on your processor- to your "C:\Windows\System32\" folder. Now that I think about it, It's probably better if you replace both halacpi.dll and halmacpi.dll inside your System32 folder too (Just to be on the safe side).

    NOTE: You'll probably find two or more folders that start with "x86_hal.inf" in your "winsxs" folder, but make sure:

    1)The folder starts with just "x86_hal.inf" not "x86_hal.inf.resources"

    2)The version number in the folder name is NOT "6.0.6001.18000" because that's SP1 one that causes the problems.

     

     

    Good Luck again!

     

     

     


    Hi, sorry for perhaps a stupid question but how do i exactly restore the files you say. I can get into command prompt. But which command should i type exactly?

    thanx!!!!
    Thursday, June 04, 2009 4:32 PM
  • NTOSKRNL.exe is the problem I get everytime after trying to install SP1 x86 (Vista).  Very frustrating.  You cannot install SP1 through windows update (only with Vista) and I have noticed this over the last 6 months or so.  Before then it worked fine.  I'm assuming many people have been having this problem and Microsoft has just decided to not allow SP1 to install through the updater services.  If so it's ridiculous......

    Cannot boot into safe mode after SP1 fails, a Chkdsk /r from disc will allow you to boot into windows again, but same problem again and again.  

    I have tried new discs, downloading new service packs and installing on two separate systems with no issues.  I have reinstalled many times, I have nuked the HDD to 0's w no luck.  

    Memtest86+ passed overnight.  New HDD 1 TB. (Is this the problem?)  Seagate

    I am a service technician for a living and am having a heck of a time trying to find a solution to this problem.  I'm going to try to install ALL the windows updates before SP1 and see if I can install it from the download again.  It's the only thing I can think of.  I'm not going to edit registry values and I don't believe we should have to -  to install a service pack.  The fact that you CANNOT INSTALL SP1 FROM WINDOWS UPDATE means there is some issue we all don't know about.

    Friday, December 28, 2012 8:55 PM