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win7 home final - no gpedit.msc?

    Question

  • if not, how do i stop windows rebooting without my consent after installing windows updates? in the past i've only been able to do it via gpedit.

    if i can't i'll have to disable windows update and do it every few weeks/month or 2 i guess.

    • Moved by Carey FrischMVP, Moderator Friday, October 23, 2009 7:04 PM Moved to relevant category (From:Windows 7 Installation, Setup, and Deployment)
    Friday, October 23, 2009 5:37 PM

Answers

  • Hi tommo123123,

     

    Group Policy is not available in Windows 7 Home Edition.

     

    You can change the Windows Update settings by performing the following steps:

     

    1. Please go to Start -> Control Panel -> Windows Update.

    2. Click "Change settings" on the left pane.

    3. Select "Check for updates but let me choose whether to download and install them".

    4. Click OK.

     

    Hope this helps.

     

    Regards,

    Linda

     

    • Marked as answer by Linda Yan Thursday, October 29, 2009 6:02 AM
    Saturday, October 24, 2009 5:06 AM

All replies

  • Hi tommo123123,

     

    Group Policy is not available in Windows 7 Home Edition.

     

    You can change the Windows Update settings by performing the following steps:

     

    1. Please go to Start -> Control Panel -> Windows Update.

    2. Click "Change settings" on the left pane.

    3. Select "Check for updates but let me choose whether to download and install them".

    4. Click OK.

     

    Hope this helps.

     

    Regards,

    Linda

     

    • Marked as answer by Linda Yan Thursday, October 29, 2009 6:02 AM
    Saturday, October 24, 2009 5:06 AM
  • But i need to use the group policy for other things....how can i run the gpedit.msc??
    Tuesday, January 19, 2010 10:42 PM
  • Just an observation, but this situation of having no gpedit (along with backup and remote desktop being crippled, etc.) is a nightmare for support people. It means that you are effectively supporting two different OS's which require entirely different support instructions. At least with XP the system-tools did not differ significantly. With 7 they do.

    Since most of the MVP's are commercial tech-guys who never encounter Home editions, I see this being an issue.

    -Separate forums for Home users? But then that just means they won't have many qualified  people to answer questions.

    -Requirement to state Home or Business/Ultimate in questions? Just an idea.
    Wednesday, January 20, 2010 9:05 AM
  • Just an observation, but this situation of having no gpedit (along with backup and remote desktop being crippled, etc.) is a nightmare for support people. It means that you are effectively supporting two different OS's which require entirely different support instructions. At least with XP the system-tools did not differ significantly. With 7 they do.

    Since most of the MVP's are commercial tech-guys who never encounter Home editions, I see this being an issue.

    -Separate forums for Home users? But then that just means they won't have many qualified  people to answer questions.

    -Requirement to state Home or Business/Ultimate in questions? Just an idea.
    Hi

    This was the same with Windows XP. The XP Home version did not have the advanced IT tools either.

    The vast majority of the Group Policy settings are registry based and can be implemented in the home versions with the registry editor.

    Here is a link to the Download: Group Policy Settings References for Windows 7 and Windows Server guide that shows all of the GP settings along with the associated registry settings for each policy.

    Hope this helps.

    Thank You for using Windows 7


    Ronnie Vernon MVP
    Wednesday, January 20, 2010 12:59 PM
    Moderator
  • Actually you're right about there being no gpedit on XP Home, I never noticed that!


    Wednesday, January 20, 2010 4:56 PM
  • Yeah but what about those that are not comfortable altering the registry,in xp & vista home or home premium we used to just copy a few files from the ultimate or ro version over to home or home premium & wohoo gpedit would work.Why cant we just do the same in win7?

     

    Monday, February 14, 2011 5:23 AM
  • I personally think it is (A) a greedy ploy to get people to purchase a more expensive version of Windows and (B) insane to force the average user to go into registry and possibly fubar the regedit.exe settings.

     

    As far as what I need to do... In your list for settings, I didn't see a listing in IE 9 and how to turn off the annoying popup asking if I want to disable add-ons. If I wanted to disable the da** things I wouldn't have installed them.

    As an IT Admin, I lose more respect for microsoft every year. "We're listening to what tech's tell us"... indeed... hurumpf!

    Saturday, June 04, 2011 9:21 PM
  • Hello Ronnie,


    Just a few remarks.


    I DID find gpedit.msc on my Windows 7 64-bit Home Premium installation! See further, as I say exactly where.

     

    I have Windows 7 64-bit Home Premium on my computer and I also have installed Office 2010 32-bit Professional Plus. My goal is to be able to set for ALL my Office 2010 applications AES at 256 bits.

     

    In order to do that, I was told that I should use

    "Office 2010 Administrative Template files (ADM, ADMX/ADML) and Office Customization Tool" at http://www.microsoft.com/download/en/details.aspx?displaylang=en&id=18968

    I did download the AdminTemplates_32bit.exe and the Office2010GroupPolicyAndOCTSettings_Reference.xls file.
    I put these 2 files in C:\Windows\PolicyDefinitions and run AdminTemplates_32bit.exe. I was not sure at all in exactly which folder I should run the AdminTemplates_32bit.exe file!
    It created:
    ---an ADM folder with adm files (office14.adm, word 14.adm, spd14.adm, etc.) that are in the en-us folder. Other folders are for other languages.
    ---an Admin folder with opax files (office14.opax, word 14.opalx, spd14.opax, etc.) and also an en-us containing opal files (office14.opal, word 14.opal, spd14.opal, etc.)
    ---an ADMX folder with adml files (office14.adml, word 14.adml, spd14.adml, etc.) that are in the en-us folder.
    ---lastly, an Office2010GroupPolicyAndOCTSettings.xls file.
    Then nothing happened. No more instructions!

    I tried quite a few things. First I thought the file gpedit.exe was needed and I tried to find it and I could not.
    Now, reading this thread, I discover that it is in fact the file gpedit.msc instead. I tried to locate it and, contrary to the claims made in this thread, I DID find this gpedit.msc file. It is located in:
    C:\Windows\winsxs\amd64_microsoft-windows-g..admin-gpedit-snapin_31bf3856ad364e35_6.1.7600.16385_none_ccd7905990f3c9d2
    I tried to run gpedit.msc in Start in Windows 7 64-bit Home Premium by simply double-clicking on it but it gives the following message:
    It shows the Local Groupd Policy Editor and the message in the main window says: MMC could not create the snap-in.

    I even have a gpedit.chm help file and I read it. Here is information that I find interesting.
    ---------------------------------------------------
    Open the Local Group Policy Editor
    You can open the Local Group Policy Editor by using the command line or by using the Microsoft Management Console (MMC).

     To open the Local Group Policy Editor from the command line

    Click Start, type gpedit.msc in the Start Search box, and then press ENTER.

     To open the Local Group Policy Editor as an MMC snap-in

    Open MMC. (Click Start, click in the Start Search box, type mmc, and then press ENTER.)

    On the File menu, click Add/Remove Snap-in.

    In the Add or Remove Snap-ins dialog box, click Group Policy Object Editor, and then click Add.

    In the Select Group Policy Object dialog box, click Browse.

    Click This computer to edit the Local Group Policy object, or click Users to edit Administrator, Non-Administrator, or per-user Local Group Policy objects.

    Click Finish.

     Note  
     If you want to save a Local Group Policy Editor console and choose which GPO opens in it from the command line, select the Allow the focus of the Group Policy Snap-in to be changed when launching from the command line check box in the Select Group Policy Object dialog box.
     
    Additional considerations
    Local Group Policy Editor and the Resultant Set of Policy snap-in are available in Windows Server 2008 R2 and Windows 7 Professional, Windows 7 Ultimate, and Windows 7 Enterprise. For more information, see http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=139815.
    ---------------------------------------------------
    The "Additional Considerations" note seems to confirm that Windows 7 Home Premium is not included. The strange thing is that I have the gpedit.msc file and also MMC that works!

    I did try the instructions above but for "In the Add or Remove Snap-ins dialog box, click Group Policy Object Editor, and then click Add." the Group Policy Object Editor was not listed. I only had listed:

    --Security Configuration and Analysis
    --Security Templates
    --IP Security Monitor
    --IP Security Policy Management
    I tried a few things with the first two but to no avail!

    But checking "What's New in Group Policy in Windows Server 2008 R2 and Windows 7" at http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd367853%28WS.10%29.aspx it says:
    ---------------------------------------------------
    Which editions include this feature?
    Group Policy is available in all editions of Windows Server 2008 R2 and Windows 7. Both local and domain-based Group Policy can be managed by using any version of Windows Server 2008 R2 and any version of Windows 7 that supports RSAT.

    Does it function differently in some editions?
    Without RSAT, only local Group Policy can be managed using Windows 7. With RSAT, both local and domain-based Group Policy can be managed using any edition of Windows 7 that supports RSAT.
    ---------------------------------------------------
    So, Group Policy is included in all editions of Windows 7!! It would seem to contradict what is said before!

    Having said that, if someone would have a solution for my particular problem of setting AES at 256 bit for ALL my Office 2010 applications on my Windows 7 64-bit Home Premium, I would appreciate.
    Moreover, is there is way to do it using the registry with regedit.exe?

    Thanks for any feedback you might have.


    Best Regards
    Michael

     






    Monday, August 01, 2011 12:41 PM
  • I have followed the instructions to open gpedit.msc but when I try to add Local Users and Groups in mmc I get the following error...

    This computer is runing Windows 7 Home Premium. This snapin may not be used with this version of Windows. To manage user acocunts for this computer, use the User Accounts tool in the Control Panel.

    Any ideas?

    Tuesday, February 28, 2012 7:49 PM
  • If I'm not mistaken, gpedit is not available in Windows home edition, only Professional and Ultimate.

    What are you attempting to do, it may or may not be possible to do without gpedit?

    Tuesday, February 28, 2012 7:55 PM
  • The previous poster to me (MichealsGreat12) suggested a way of accessing gpedit.msc in Windows 7 Home Premium, as the file exists. But following the instructions he gives doesn't seem to work.

    I am trying to change the network security so that I can get Outlook 2003 to connect to a microsoft exchange server (see two thirds down the page here). I have been trying to get my microsoft exchange emails for some weeks now with no luck.

    Any ideas? I get the message:

    Outlook cannot logon. Verify you are connected to the network and are using the proper server and mailbox name. The Connection to Microsoft Eschange is unavailable. Outlook must be online or connected to complete this action.

    I have posted in Outlook, Microsoft Exchange and Windows 7 forums, but no luck yet... :(


    • Edited by elinoir Tuesday, February 28, 2012 8:08 PM
    Tuesday, February 28, 2012 8:05 PM
  • As far as I know you can't connect outlook to exchange without being connected to a domain and Windows home from xp on hasn't been able to connect to a domain.

    I tried a million different things to prove the people at Microsoft wrong but I finally upgraded my wife's laptop to Win7 pro just so i could put her on my test network at home.  (which is how I learned that no matter what you do you're not going to get gpedit to work on home)

    Even if you download and install it you're not going to get it to work because it's missing key components.

    good luck

    Tuesday, February 28, 2012 8:30 PM
  • As far as I know you can't connect outlook to exchange without being connected to a domain and Windows home from xp on hasn't been able to connect to a domain.

    I tried a million different things to prove the people at Microsoft wrong but I finally upgraded my wife's laptop to Win7 pro just so i could put her on my test network at home.  (which is how I learned that no matter what you do you're not going to get gpedit to work on home)

    Even if you download and install it you're not going to get it to work because it's missing key components.

    good luck


    Thanks for the info, might save me some time. That is quite depressing though. I looked into Home and Pro differences before buying but obviously didn't go into it deep enough, that might turn out to be an expensive mistake.
    Tuesday, February 28, 2012 8:36 PM
  • its very easy to install gp edit in any ver of windows here is it 

    http://www.askvg.com/how-to-enable-group-policy-editor-gpedit-msc-in-windows-7-home-premium-home-basic-and-starter-editions/

    it takes 2 mins and it free :)

    Thursday, November 01, 2012 9:41 AM