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Dual boot windows xp pro with windows 7

    Question

  • I want to and am plannig to try to dual boot windows 7 and keep my xp.  I  my hard drive is  500G partitoned for a 165 G- C drive,xp installed,  117 G- D drive, formated NTFS-nothing installed, 107 G- E drive formated FAT 32, nothing installed, 110 G- F drive, FAT 32, games & etc. Is there a way to install windows 7 home upgrade on Drive C and transfer xp pro that I am using now to Drive D and create a dual boot to be able to chose which system I want to use?  Any detailed help would be very helpful.  My computer has dual IBM E 8400 chips,
    500 G drive, dual nvidia 8400 graphic cards.
    Saturday, August 15, 2009 7:31 PM

Answers

  • Why do you want to install Windows 7 on drive C:? Not that it were impossible, but the easier way would be to leave XP on C: (which, I suppose, is the partition marked as "System, Active, Primary" - thus booted by BIOS) and do a "custom install" of Windows 7 on partition D: This way the bootfiles for both XP and Windows 7 would be placed on C:, and you could dual-boot right away. If you would install Windows 7 on drive C: and transfer XP to drive D:, chances are great that you get a single-boot Windows 7 system and have to manually configure the booting process to include XP. That's possible, too (using tools like EasyBCD), but I see no real sense in it.
    Mobile AMD64 3000+, VIA Apollo K8T800 chipset, 1 G RAM, ATIRadeonMobility 9700, 20x DVDRW, C:XPSP3 (55G),D:WIN7 (25G),F:DATA (250G)
    Saturday, August 15, 2009 11:24 PM
  • Hello,

    First I want you know if you do install Windows 7 OS on the D: partition, the system would regard your D: partition (117G) as C drive in Windows 7. As a customer, I don’t think you would really care which partition you install your OS on. Otherwise, the only method I recommend is to format both C:\ and D:\ partition; first install Windows XP on D:\ and then install Windows 7 on C: drive. Thanks for your time and understanding!

     

    Good luck!

    Andy

    Sunday, August 16, 2009 9:21 AM

All replies

  • Why do you want to install Windows 7 on drive C:? Not that it were impossible, but the easier way would be to leave XP on C: (which, I suppose, is the partition marked as "System, Active, Primary" - thus booted by BIOS) and do a "custom install" of Windows 7 on partition D: This way the bootfiles for both XP and Windows 7 would be placed on C:, and you could dual-boot right away. If you would install Windows 7 on drive C: and transfer XP to drive D:, chances are great that you get a single-boot Windows 7 system and have to manually configure the booting process to include XP. That's possible, too (using tools like EasyBCD), but I see no real sense in it.
    Mobile AMD64 3000+, VIA Apollo K8T800 chipset, 1 G RAM, ATIRadeonMobility 9700, 20x DVDRW, C:XPSP3 (55G),D:WIN7 (25G),F:DATA (250G)
    Saturday, August 15, 2009 11:24 PM
  • I am doing a similar dual boot setup but with a 160gb hard drive split in 2.  I installed XP home on the C:/ drive and 7 RC on the D:/ drive.  I did it succesfully but the boot manager screen says this in the menu.

    Earlier Version of Windows
    Windows 7

    How do I edit the boot manager so that it says Windows XP and Windows 7?
    • Proposed as answer by PMS Witch Sunday, August 16, 2009 1:18 PM
    Sunday, August 16, 2009 1:55 AM
  • If I undrestood you correctly, you could copy all the xp files from root of c:\ and paste them to root of d:\. Now swap those two drive ports and install 7 to drive c:\.
    Sunday, August 16, 2009 8:44 AM
  • Hello,

    First I want you know if you do install Windows 7 OS on the D: partition, the system would regard your D: partition (117G) as C drive in Windows 7. As a customer, I don’t think you would really care which partition you install your OS on. Otherwise, the only method I recommend is to format both C:\ and D:\ partition; first install Windows XP on D:\ and then install Windows 7 on C: drive. Thanks for your time and understanding!

     

    Good luck!

    Andy

    Sunday, August 16, 2009 9:21 AM
  • Use BCDedit to change the description(s).

    In Windows 7, Right-click a Command Prompt and select Run as Administrator.

    To change the Windows 7 description, use
    BCDEDIT /set {current} description "Windows 7 new description"

    To change the Windows XP description, use
    BCDEDIT /set {ntldr} description "Windows XP new description"

    Be sure to put what you want displayed between quotes.

    Cheers, PW.
    • Proposed as answer by Oops Again Monday, August 17, 2009 1:06 AM
    Sunday, August 16, 2009 1:29 PM