none
Blue screen while playing Rome Total War

    Question

  • After playing Rome Total War my comp crashes after a couple minutes doing the campaign. My drivers are up to date.

    https://skydrive.live.com/#cid=B15BAE53AEC18557

    This is the dump file. Any help would be appreciated.

    Friday, March 01, 2013 7:04 PM

Answers

  • Stop 0x124 is a hardware error
    If you are overclocking try resetting your processor to standard settings and see if that helps.
    If you continue to get BSOD here are some more things you may want to consider.

    This is usually heat related, defective hardware, memory or even processor though it is"possible" that it is driver related (rare).

    Stop 0x124 - what it means and what to try

    Synopsis:
    A "stop 0x124" is fundamentally different to many other types of bluescreens because it stems from a hardware complaint.
    Stop 0x124 minidumps contain very little practical information, and it is therefore necessary to approach the problem as a case of hardware in an unknown state of distress.


     Generic "Stop 0x124" Troubleshooting Strategy:

    1) Ensure that none of the hardware components are overclocked. Hardware that is driven beyond its design specifications - by overclocking - can malfunction in unpredictable ways.
    2) Ensure that the machine is adequately cooled.
     If there is any doubt, open up the side of the PC case (be mindful of any relevant warranty conditions!) and point a mains fan squarely at the motherboard. That will rule out most (lack of) cooling issues.
    3) Update all hardware-related drivers: video, sound, RAID (if any), NIC... anything that interacts with a piece of hardware.
    It is good practice to run the latest drivers anyway.
    4) Update the motherboard BIOS according to the manufacturer's instructions.
    Their website should provide detailed instructions as to the brand and model-specific procedure.
    5) Rarely, bugs in the OS may cause "false positive" 0x124 events where the hardware wasn't complaining but Windows thought otherwise (because of the bug).
    At the time of writing, Windows 7 is not known to suffer from any such defects, but it is nevertheless important to always keep Windows itself updated.
    6) Attempt to (stress) test those hardware components which can be put through their paces artificially.
    The most obvious examples are the RAM and HDD(s).
    For the RAM, use the in-built memory diagnostics (run MDSCHED) or the 3rd-party memtest86 utility to run many hours worth of testing.
    For hard drives, check whether CHKDSK /R finds any problems on the drive(s), notably "bad sectors".
    Unreliable RAM, in particular, is deadly as far as software is concerned, and anything other than a 100% clear memory test result is cause for concern. Unfortunately, even a 100% clear result from the diagnostics utilities does not guarantee that the RAM is free from defects - only that none were encountered during the test passes.
    7) As the last of the non-invasive troubleshooting steps, perform a "vanilla" reinstallation of Windows: just the OS itself without any additional applications, games, utilities, updates, or new drivers - NOTHING AT ALL that is not sourced from the Windows 7 disc.
    Should that fail to mitigate the 0x124 problem, jump to the next steps.
    If you run the "vanilla" installation long enough to convince yourself that not a single 0x124 crash has occurred, start installing updates and applications slowly, always pausing between successive additions long enough to get a feel for whether the machine is still free from 0x124 crashes.
    Should the crashing resume, obviously the very last software addition(s) may be somehow linked to the root cause.
    If stop 0x124 errors persist despite the steps above, and the hardware is under warranty, consider returning it and requesting a replacement which does not suffer periodic MCE events.
    Be aware that attempting the subsequent hardware troubleshooting steps may, in some cases, void your warranty:
    8) Clean and carefully remove any dust from the inside of the machine.
    Reseat all connectors and memory modules.
    Use a can of compressed air to clean out the RAM DIMM sockets as much as possible.
    9) If all else fails, start removing items of hardware one-by-one in the hope that the culprit is something non-essential which can be removed.
    Obviously, this type of testing is a lot easier if you've got access to equivalent components in order to perform swaps.

    Should you find yourself in the situation of having performed all of the steps above without a resolution of the symptom, unfortunately the most likely reason is because the error message is literally correct - something is fundamentally wrong with the machine's hardware.

    Dyami & Wanikiya ...Team ZigZag.

    Sunday, March 03, 2013 4:25 AM
  • Your machine bugchecked 0x124

    WHEA_UNCORRECTABLE_ERROR (124)
    A fatal hardware error has occurred. Parameter 1 identifies the type of error
    source that reported the error. Parameter 2 holds the address of the
    WHEA_ERROR_RECORD structure that describes the error conditon.
    Arguments:
    Arg1: 0000000000000000, Machine Check Exception
    Arg2: fffffa8005f1c038, Address of the WHEA_ERROR_RECORD structure.
    Arg3: 0000000000000000, High order 32-bits of the MCi_STATUS value.
    Arg4: 0000000000000000, Low order 32-bits of the MCi_STATUS value.
    
    Debugging Details:
    ------------------
    
    
    BUGCHECK_STR:  0x124_AuthenticAMD
    
    CUSTOMER_CRASH_COUNT:  1
    
    DEFAULT_BUCKET_ID:  WIN7_DRIVER_FAULT
    
    PROCESS_NAME:  System
    
    CURRENT_IRQL:  0
    
    STACK_TEXT:  
    fffff880`02ff56f0 fffff800`02ce0ca9 : fffffa80`05f1c010 fffffa80`0514ab50 00000000`0000000a 00000000`00000000 : nt!WheapCreateLiveTriageDump+0x6c
    fffff880`02ff5c10 fffff800`02bc1077 : fffffa80`05f1c010 fffff800`02c3b2d8 fffffa80`0514ab50 00000000`00000000 : nt!WheapCreateTriageDumpFromPreviousSession+0x49
    fffff880`02ff5c40 fffff800`02b28435 : fffff800`02c9cae0 00000000`00000001 fffffa80`053b7850 fffffa80`0514ab50 : nt!WheapProcessWorkQueueItem+0x57
    fffff880`02ff5c80 fffff800`02a9dca9 : fffff880`010bee00 fffff800`02b28410 fffffa80`0514ab00 00000000`00000000 : nt!WheapWorkQueueWorkerRoutine+0x25
    fffff880`02ff5cb0 fffff800`02d3534a : 00000000`00000000 fffffa80`0514ab50 00000000`00000080 fffffa80`05087b30 : nt!ExpWorkerThread+0x111
    fffff880`02ff5d40 fffff800`02a85946 : fffff880`02ea4180 fffffa80`0514ab50 fffff880`02eaefc0 00000000`00000000 : nt!PspSystemThreadStartup+0x5a
    fffff880`02ff5d80 00000000`00000000 : fffff880`02ff6000 fffff880`02ff0000 fffff880`02ff52c0 00000000`00000000 : nt!KiStartSystemThread+0x16
    
    
    STACK_COMMAND:  kb
    
    FOLLOWUP_NAME:  MachineOwner
    
    MODULE_NAME: AuthenticAMD
    
    IMAGE_NAME:  AuthenticAMD
    
    DEBUG_FLR_IMAGE_TIMESTAMP:  0
    
    FAILURE_BUCKET_ID:  X64_0x124_AuthenticAMD_PROCESSOR_BUS_PRV
    
    BUCKET_ID:  X64_0x124_AuthenticAMD_PROCESSOR_BUS_PRV
    
    Followup: MachineOwner

    From http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/subscriptions/index/ff557321(v=vs.85).aspx

    These actions might prevent an error like this from happening again:

    1. Download and install updates and device drivers for your computer from Windows Update.
    2. Scan your computer for computer viruses.
    3. Check your hard disk for errors.

    Since you stated your drivers are updated I wouldn't look at 1 but, 2 and 3 might be interesting.

    To scan the hard disk run chkdsk /f /r and then reboot.

    Also you might have some benefit from http://windows.microsoft.com/en-US/windows7/Resolving-stop-blue-screen-errors-in-Windows-7

    Also if you have overclocked your machine in some way you might want to stop that.


    Please remember to click “Mark as Answer” on the post that helps you, and to click “Unmark as Answer” if a marked post does not actually answer your question. This can be beneficial to other community members reading the thread. ” How to ask a question that is fixable.



    Sunday, March 03, 2013 3:06 AM

All replies

  • Hornztheman

    Nothing in that folder but a txt file of the crash we need the actual DMP file

     We do need the actual DMP file as it contains the only record of the sequence of events leading up to the crash, what drivers were loaded, and what was responsible.
    You may be able to get the DMP files without crashing by booting into safe mode (F8) with networking.
    If you are overclocking stop.  (chances are if you dont know if you are, you are not)a
    To enable us to assist you with your computer's BSOD symptoms, upload the contents of your "\Windows\Minidump" folder.


    The procedure:

    * Copy the contents of \Windows\Minidump to another (temporary) location somewhere on your machine.
    * Zip up the copy.
    * Attach the ZIP archive to your post using the "paperclip" (file attachments) button. (if available on  your site, MS doesnt have this)
     *Please upload them to a file sharing service like Skydrive or"Rapidshare" and put a link to them in your reply.
    Link for how to  upload below.
    http://www.wikihow.com/Use-SkyDrive

    To ensure minidumps are enabled:

    * Go to Start, in the Search Box type: sysdm.cpl, press Enter.
    * Under the Advanced tab, click on the Startup and Recovery Settings... button.
    * Ensure that Automatically restart is unchecked.
    * Under the Write Debugging Information header select Small memory dump (256 kB) in the dropdown box (the 256kb varies).
    * Ensure that the Small Dump Directory is listed as %systemroot%\Minidump.
    * OK your way out.
    * Reboot if changes have been made.

    Please also run MSinfo32 and upload the output as well.
    To run MSinfo32 please go to start>run>MSinfo32
    Go to "file" "save" and upload the saved file with the DMPS
    (Instructions for XP, Vista, Win 7, Win 8)
    System specs are often useful so include whatever you know


    Wanikiya & Dyami -Team-ZigZag.


    Friday, March 01, 2013 7:58 PM
  • IS this  better?

    https://skydrive.live.com/?cid=B15BAE53AEC18557#cid=B15BAE53AEC18557

    Friday, March 01, 2013 8:09 PM
  • Your machine bugchecked 0x124

    WHEA_UNCORRECTABLE_ERROR (124)
    A fatal hardware error has occurred. Parameter 1 identifies the type of error
    source that reported the error. Parameter 2 holds the address of the
    WHEA_ERROR_RECORD structure that describes the error conditon.
    Arguments:
    Arg1: 0000000000000000, Machine Check Exception
    Arg2: fffffa8005f1c038, Address of the WHEA_ERROR_RECORD structure.
    Arg3: 0000000000000000, High order 32-bits of the MCi_STATUS value.
    Arg4: 0000000000000000, Low order 32-bits of the MCi_STATUS value.
    
    Debugging Details:
    ------------------
    
    
    BUGCHECK_STR:  0x124_AuthenticAMD
    
    CUSTOMER_CRASH_COUNT:  1
    
    DEFAULT_BUCKET_ID:  WIN7_DRIVER_FAULT
    
    PROCESS_NAME:  System
    
    CURRENT_IRQL:  0
    
    STACK_TEXT:  
    fffff880`02ff56f0 fffff800`02ce0ca9 : fffffa80`05f1c010 fffffa80`0514ab50 00000000`0000000a 00000000`00000000 : nt!WheapCreateLiveTriageDump+0x6c
    fffff880`02ff5c10 fffff800`02bc1077 : fffffa80`05f1c010 fffff800`02c3b2d8 fffffa80`0514ab50 00000000`00000000 : nt!WheapCreateTriageDumpFromPreviousSession+0x49
    fffff880`02ff5c40 fffff800`02b28435 : fffff800`02c9cae0 00000000`00000001 fffffa80`053b7850 fffffa80`0514ab50 : nt!WheapProcessWorkQueueItem+0x57
    fffff880`02ff5c80 fffff800`02a9dca9 : fffff880`010bee00 fffff800`02b28410 fffffa80`0514ab00 00000000`00000000 : nt!WheapWorkQueueWorkerRoutine+0x25
    fffff880`02ff5cb0 fffff800`02d3534a : 00000000`00000000 fffffa80`0514ab50 00000000`00000080 fffffa80`05087b30 : nt!ExpWorkerThread+0x111
    fffff880`02ff5d40 fffff800`02a85946 : fffff880`02ea4180 fffffa80`0514ab50 fffff880`02eaefc0 00000000`00000000 : nt!PspSystemThreadStartup+0x5a
    fffff880`02ff5d80 00000000`00000000 : fffff880`02ff6000 fffff880`02ff0000 fffff880`02ff52c0 00000000`00000000 : nt!KiStartSystemThread+0x16
    
    
    STACK_COMMAND:  kb
    
    FOLLOWUP_NAME:  MachineOwner
    
    MODULE_NAME: AuthenticAMD
    
    IMAGE_NAME:  AuthenticAMD
    
    DEBUG_FLR_IMAGE_TIMESTAMP:  0
    
    FAILURE_BUCKET_ID:  X64_0x124_AuthenticAMD_PROCESSOR_BUS_PRV
    
    BUCKET_ID:  X64_0x124_AuthenticAMD_PROCESSOR_BUS_PRV
    
    Followup: MachineOwner

    From http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/subscriptions/index/ff557321(v=vs.85).aspx

    These actions might prevent an error like this from happening again:

    1. Download and install updates and device drivers for your computer from Windows Update.
    2. Scan your computer for computer viruses.
    3. Check your hard disk for errors.

    Since you stated your drivers are updated I wouldn't look at 1 but, 2 and 3 might be interesting.

    To scan the hard disk run chkdsk /f /r and then reboot.

    Also you might have some benefit from http://windows.microsoft.com/en-US/windows7/Resolving-stop-blue-screen-errors-in-Windows-7

    Also if you have overclocked your machine in some way you might want to stop that.


    Please remember to click “Mark as Answer” on the post that helps you, and to click “Unmark as Answer” if a marked post does not actually answer your question. This can be beneficial to other community members reading the thread. ” How to ask a question that is fixable.



    Sunday, March 03, 2013 3:06 AM
  • Stop 0x124 is a hardware error
    If you are overclocking try resetting your processor to standard settings and see if that helps.
    If you continue to get BSOD here are some more things you may want to consider.

    This is usually heat related, defective hardware, memory or even processor though it is"possible" that it is driver related (rare).

    Stop 0x124 - what it means and what to try

    Synopsis:
    A "stop 0x124" is fundamentally different to many other types of bluescreens because it stems from a hardware complaint.
    Stop 0x124 minidumps contain very little practical information, and it is therefore necessary to approach the problem as a case of hardware in an unknown state of distress.


     Generic "Stop 0x124" Troubleshooting Strategy:

    1) Ensure that none of the hardware components are overclocked. Hardware that is driven beyond its design specifications - by overclocking - can malfunction in unpredictable ways.
    2) Ensure that the machine is adequately cooled.
     If there is any doubt, open up the side of the PC case (be mindful of any relevant warranty conditions!) and point a mains fan squarely at the motherboard. That will rule out most (lack of) cooling issues.
    3) Update all hardware-related drivers: video, sound, RAID (if any), NIC... anything that interacts with a piece of hardware.
    It is good practice to run the latest drivers anyway.
    4) Update the motherboard BIOS according to the manufacturer's instructions.
    Their website should provide detailed instructions as to the brand and model-specific procedure.
    5) Rarely, bugs in the OS may cause "false positive" 0x124 events where the hardware wasn't complaining but Windows thought otherwise (because of the bug).
    At the time of writing, Windows 7 is not known to suffer from any such defects, but it is nevertheless important to always keep Windows itself updated.
    6) Attempt to (stress) test those hardware components which can be put through their paces artificially.
    The most obvious examples are the RAM and HDD(s).
    For the RAM, use the in-built memory diagnostics (run MDSCHED) or the 3rd-party memtest86 utility to run many hours worth of testing.
    For hard drives, check whether CHKDSK /R finds any problems on the drive(s), notably "bad sectors".
    Unreliable RAM, in particular, is deadly as far as software is concerned, and anything other than a 100% clear memory test result is cause for concern. Unfortunately, even a 100% clear result from the diagnostics utilities does not guarantee that the RAM is free from defects - only that none were encountered during the test passes.
    7) As the last of the non-invasive troubleshooting steps, perform a "vanilla" reinstallation of Windows: just the OS itself without any additional applications, games, utilities, updates, or new drivers - NOTHING AT ALL that is not sourced from the Windows 7 disc.
    Should that fail to mitigate the 0x124 problem, jump to the next steps.
    If you run the "vanilla" installation long enough to convince yourself that not a single 0x124 crash has occurred, start installing updates and applications slowly, always pausing between successive additions long enough to get a feel for whether the machine is still free from 0x124 crashes.
    Should the crashing resume, obviously the very last software addition(s) may be somehow linked to the root cause.
    If stop 0x124 errors persist despite the steps above, and the hardware is under warranty, consider returning it and requesting a replacement which does not suffer periodic MCE events.
    Be aware that attempting the subsequent hardware troubleshooting steps may, in some cases, void your warranty:
    8) Clean and carefully remove any dust from the inside of the machine.
    Reseat all connectors and memory modules.
    Use a can of compressed air to clean out the RAM DIMM sockets as much as possible.
    9) If all else fails, start removing items of hardware one-by-one in the hope that the culprit is something non-essential which can be removed.
    Obviously, this type of testing is a lot easier if you've got access to equivalent components in order to perform swaps.

    Should you find yourself in the situation of having performed all of the steps above without a resolution of the symptom, unfortunately the most likely reason is because the error message is literally correct - something is fundamentally wrong with the machine's hardware.

    Dyami & Wanikiya ...Team ZigZag.

    Sunday, March 03, 2013 4:25 AM