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Where is \Device\Harddisk5\DR5

    Question

  • I have a number of these messages in the event log on my newly built Windows 7 machine. I also have one instance of "The device, \Device\Harddisk5\DR5, has a bad block."

    You may note that the disk is not the same in these two messages, and the messages about controller errors has different disk at different occassions. From some googling, I've understood that this may be related to USB disks that get different addresses every time.

    Still, I'm a little nervous. SATA disks are also removables, and can I be sure that this does not relate to any of my SATA disks? Since the machine is new, there is also a new disk which may not be perfect. Furthermore, I experience two hanging incidents yesterday. There is another suspect, but obviously errors with the system disk could cause hanging. Also, after these incidents, there were several programs that had problems because of missing files or incorrect registry entries. Which may because I had to make a hard restart, but... I ran CHKDSK during the night and it came out clean.

    One thing I would really like to know is, how do I map this \Device\Harddisk#\DR# to a physical disk? I tried the registry, I've tried Google, but my success have been limited.


    Erland Sommarskog, SQL Server MVP, esquel@sommarskog.se
    Friday, July 29, 2011 8:48 AM

Answers

  • > That?s hard to detected which physical disk is \Device\Harddisk5\DR5, as I said the number should be USB controller ID, like USB port number. If you want to determine which HD was broken, you should unplug all necessary hardware first(DVD ROM, Printer), and test the harddisk one by one. Like Vegan said removing all the disks except system drive to check if the same issue occurs.

    Since the error is only occasional, this is not exactly trivial. I like to use the computer too. :-)

    My main theory is that it is a generic issue with the USB controller/driver, since it seems I've gotten the error with different USB devices connected. And I can't say for sure that the error has occurred when no USB device has been connected. (And now, I've connected one on constant basis, since I run Acronis Non-stop Backup to it.)

    The good news is that the hanging incidents I experienced have not returned. When they occurred I had several high-volume operations going on; maybe something just choked.


    Erland Sommarskog, SQL Server MVP, esquel@sommarskog.se
    Friday, August 05, 2011 9:53 PM

All replies

  • You can download a disk utility from the manufacturer's support and run the quick test on the hard disks in the computer. Then you can be confident about the physical integrity of the disks.

    If you suspect the message may be from usb flash drives-save any important data and clean , repartition, and format those.

    This is a "newly built" and "Since the machine is new"- Did you build the machine or a vendor? If a vendor, contact their support to be certain the installation is stabile.

    Are the motherboard drivers the latest for Windows 7? That may resolve storage controller errors.

    From an elevated command prompt run the system file checker sfc /scannow.

    Application problems or incompatibility with Windows 7 will only serve to complicate the situation.

    This is a "new machine"? These issues should not exist. I would be concerned, perhaps consider a reimage or a clean installation.

     


    Friday, July 29, 2011 11:38 AM
  • I've built the machine from parts I've bought. The system disk is new, but the other two disks were carried over from a new computer.

    But you did not answer the question, how do I map a path like \Device\Harddisk5\DR5 to a physical disk? If I can ascertain that the error is only related to USB devices, I can sleep better at night.


    Erland Sommarskog, SQL Server MVP, esquel@sommarskog.se
    Friday, July 29, 2011 6:15 PM
  • Disk management in Computer management or diskpart from an elevated command prompt will identify the disks that are currently connected to the computer.

    The harddisk5\dr5 appears like a logical drive and partition on one of the non-system disks. The system disk will be disk 0.

    Saturday, July 30, 2011 10:33 AM
  • Disk management in Computer management or diskpart from an elevated command prompt will identify the disks that are currently connected to the computer.

    Yes, I am well acquainted with the Disk Management tool. Unfortunately there are no paths starting with \Device\Harddisk# visible here.

    The harddisk5\dr5 appears like a logical drive and partition on one of the non-system disks. The system disk will be disk 0.


    Actually not. It appears as Disk 1 on my machine.


    Erland Sommarskog, SQL Server MVP, esquel@sommarskog.se
    Saturday, July 30, 2011 6:47 PM
  • > Run CHKDSK /R on all the disks and this will test them for problems

    Yes, I've run CHKDSK. One partition actually had errors, but that's an old partition which I don't use, and may have had errors since before. Others were clean. That still does not prove that there are no problems.

    But maybe you can answer the question in the subject line? Or is the answer that Windows spews out a warning with an address you cannot translate?


    Erland Sommarskog, SQL Server MVP, esquel@sommarskog.se
    Saturday, July 30, 2011 10:01 PM
  • That message is not very useful outside the OS itself.

    That is: Windows produces an error message about a potentially serious condition on a disk, but does not care to tell you which disk, only pretends to? I would call that a serious shortcoming that Microsoft needs to address.

    (I seem to recall this message from a customer that had plentyful of these in the event log on the server. No one had ever cared about them, or the corruption reported in the DBCC logs. Eventually one of the database crashed completely.)

    Delete the damage partition if its not being used

    I plan to do that anyway, since that disk has a second partition which could expeand.

    I need some machine details so I can help better

    including all disk make/model


    Eh, do you need to know all disks and models to be able to translate \Device\Harddisk5\DR5 or whatever is reported in the error messages?

    I checked my old computer, and it also had messages with this type of address, but the main meat of the messages was something else, and they were only warnings. So maybe this is related to removable disks and nothing to lose sleep over. But it would be good to have it confirmed.


    Erland Sommarskog, SQL Server MVP, esquel@sommarskog.se
    Sunday, July 31, 2011 7:51 AM
  • Hi,

     

    Bad blocks are sometimes physical damages on the drive. Also it may be caused by SATA controller on motherboard.

     

    Could all hard disks recognized in BIOS?  Please try to update BIOS to the latest version for test.

     

    I found there’s a KB may helpful to distinguish a physical disk device:

    http://support.microsoft.com/kb/159865

     

    Furthermore, since this is hardware problem, I suggest to contact hardware manufacturer to check if HD or motherboard or others has broken.

     

    Thank you for your understanding.

     

    Regards, 

    Leo   Huang

    TechNet Subscriber Support in forum. If you have any feedback on our support, please contact tngfb@microsoft.com


    Please remember to click “Mark as Answer” on the post that helps you, and to click “Unmark as Answer” if a marked post does not actually answer your question. This can be beneficial to other community members reading the thread.
    Monday, August 01, 2011 3:06 AM
    Moderator
  • I found there?s a KB may helpful to distinguish a physical disk device:

    http://support.microsoft.com/kb/159865

    "This article applies to a different version of Windows than the one you are using. Content in this article may not be relevant to you. Visit the Windows 7 Solution Center"

    And indeed, the registry keys mentioned in that article are not present in my machine. (HKLM\Hardware\DeviceMap is, but it stops there.)

    Furthermore, since this is hardware problem, I suggest to contact hardware manufacturer to check if HD or motherboard or others has broken.


    At this point it is a Windows problem. It's difficult to contact any manufacturer, if I don't know which manufacturer to contact. Once I know which disk(s) the message refers, I can take the next step.


    Erland Sommarskog, SQL Server MVP, esquel@sommarskog.se
    Monday, August 01, 2011 6:10 PM
  • > Go find a free tool called Crystal Disk Reports and it will tell you what is what, post the results here as I can read them easy.

    I assume that you meant Crystal Disk Info. That was a neat little tool, but I cannot see any device paths. My Firewall alerted me that it wanted to get direct disk access to DR0, but the most recent error message (1½ hour ago) was for on \Device\Harddisk6\DR7.


    Erland Sommarskog, SQL Server MVP, esquel@sommarskog.se
    Tuesday, August 02, 2011 8:42 PM
  • DR# means drive, removable, and then the number Windows 7 has assigned that removable drive. # is the USB host controller ID assigned by Windows during setup. If you switch your HD to another USB port, the number should change.

     

    Regards,

    Leo   Huang

     

    TechNet Subscriber Support in forum. If you have any feedback on our support, please contact tngfb@microsoft.com

     


    Please remember to click “Mark as Answer” on the post that helps you, and to click “Unmark as Answer” if a marked post does not actually answer your question. This can be beneficial to other community members reading the thread.
    • Proposed as answer by mcbsys Monday, December 24, 2012 5:09 PM
    Wednesday, August 03, 2011 7:28 AM
    Moderator
  • > Can you paste the report from that tool here please

    Not sure what report you are talking about, but you find one screen shot per disk in http://www.sommarskog.se/temp/temp.zip


    Erland Sommarskog, SQL Server MVP, esquel@sommarskog.se
    Wednesday, August 03, 2011 8:53 PM
  • Well, while you pointed me to a tool that was kind of cute, I would still have appreciated if you had given me answer to my question. Even if that answer is "that path cannot be translated".

    I have no immediate plans to replace those disks.


    Erland Sommarskog, SQL Server MVP, esquel@sommarskog.se
    Wednesday, August 03, 2011 10:16 PM
  • That’s hard to detected which physical disk is \Device\Harddisk5\DR5, as I said the number should be USB controller ID, like USB port number. If you want to determine which HD was broken, you should unplug all necessary hardware first(DVD ROM, Printer), and test the harddisk one by one. Like Vegan said removing all the disks except system drive to check if the same issue occurs.

     

     

    Regards,

    Leo   Huang

     

    TechNet Subscriber Support in forum. If you have any feedback on our support, please contact tngfb@microsoft.com

     


    Please remember to click “Mark as Answer” on the post that helps you, and to click “Unmark as Answer” if a marked post does not actually answer your question. This can be beneficial to other community members reading the thread.
      
     
    Friday, August 05, 2011 9:13 AM
    Moderator
  • > That?s hard to detected which physical disk is \Device\Harddisk5\DR5, as I said the number should be USB controller ID, like USB port number. If you want to determine which HD was broken, you should unplug all necessary hardware first(DVD ROM, Printer), and test the harddisk one by one. Like Vegan said removing all the disks except system drive to check if the same issue occurs.

    Since the error is only occasional, this is not exactly trivial. I like to use the computer too. :-)

    My main theory is that it is a generic issue with the USB controller/driver, since it seems I've gotten the error with different USB devices connected. And I can't say for sure that the error has occurred when no USB device has been connected. (And now, I've connected one on constant basis, since I run Acronis Non-stop Backup to it.)

    The good news is that the hanging incidents I experienced have not returned. When they occurred I had several high-volume operations going on; maybe something just choked.


    Erland Sommarskog, SQL Server MVP, esquel@sommarskog.se
    Friday, August 05, 2011 9:53 PM
  • That sounds good. The issue should related with the USB controller. If the issue returns, check the USB device, or remove and re-plug the device.

     

    Enjoy your new PC and have a nice day.

     

    Regards,

    Leo   Huang

     

    TechNet Subscriber Support in forum. If you have any feedback on our support, please contact tngfb@microsoft.com


    Please remember to click “Mark as Answer” on the post that helps you, and to click “Unmark as Answer” if a marked post does not actually answer your question. This can be beneficial to other community members reading the thread.
    Monday, August 08, 2011 3:29 AM
    Moderator
  • Hi,

     

    I will temporally mark your reply as answer, if the issue still persists, please feel free to  reply this post directly so we will be notified to follow it up. You can also choose to unmark the answer as you wish.

     

    Thank you for your understanding.

     

     

    Regards,

    Leo   Huang

     

    TechNet Subscriber Support in forum. If you have any feedback on our support, please contact tngfb@microsoft.com

     


    Please remember to click “Mark as Answer” on the post that helps you, and to click “Unmark as Answer” if a marked post does not actually answer your question. This can be beneficial to other community members reading the thread.
    • Proposed as answer by dcord Monday, May 28, 2012 9:12 PM
    Thursday, August 11, 2011 2:40 AM
    Moderator
  • OK so I have the same problem at boot up with \Device\harddisk5\DR5 No harddisk found. insert disk and try again. if I click cancel 20 times this message goes away until I reboot my system. Whereupon it returns. Have been looking for a solution for quite some time and the closest thing I have come up with is that the error is caused by removal of a disk before total install or before "safe to eject".  In the event viewer if you right click the event it will give you a better description of what this problem is. using Microsoft error codes or event ID numbers I have narrowed it down to an improper ejection of a disk. It will also show you the HTML tag for it, so if you can find that tag in the HTML file and delete it you will probably take care of the problem altogether, well at least that's what I am going to try and do.  I have scoured the registry for this  file and can't seem to find it. If I knew which disk it was asking for I could probably stop this error that way but who knows.
    Monday, May 28, 2012 9:30 PM