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Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 Upgrade Invalid Key

    Question

  • I have a computer that died. It had a full retail version of Windows XP on it. I purchased Win7 Home Prem Sp1 Upgrade from Newegg along with basically all new parts to fix it. The drive is new. I tried installing Win 7 in a custom install with a new partition, and the key is flagged as invalid. If I chose skip and try to activate it once Windows is installed, it notifies me that the key doesn't work on a clean install.

    This is completely contrary to the "Upgrading from Windows XP?" flyer inside the packaging, not to mention it's contrary to the last 2 non-SP1 upgrades I've done from XP which worked perfectly fine in this regard.

    I am looking for STEP-BY-STEP instructions as to how a person can install a Windows 7 Home Premium SP1 Upgrade on a hard disk, with a clean parition.

    I don't see how having a copy of XP on it can help. You go in on custom, you format the partition. It doesn't check the product key until the old data is blasted away. That's why it says to backup your files.

    I don't see why I can't just type in the serial from the software I'm upgrading from, much like.. every other upgrade program that I've ever used in the past 28 years or so of computing and IT work.

    Tuesday, June 12, 2012 6:10 AM

Answers

  • "Project Mercy" wrote in message news:8a31055f-018c-49d3-b1ff-c2602fa5590c...

    This makes no sense to me. I have Photoshop CS4. When I bought the upgrade to it. I ran it, it asked for my old key, I put the key in, it unlocked. I didn't have to install CS2, so I could install CS3, so I could install CS4, so I could install CS5. I have an upgrade of Word 2010. It asked for the old CD. I put it in, it unlocked.

    I have 5 machines that I maintain. 4 had XP, one had vista on it. The vista copy was full. I threw a new HD in when I did the upgrade to Win7 Pro. It didn't ask for a disk, it just installed and activated. I bought a full copy of Win7 Pro, and of course it worked fine. Over the next few months I upgraded 2 more of the XP machines. Home Premium. New hard disks, no issues.  Now.. after 3 upgrades, suddenly I have the "Sp1" disk, and it doesn't work the same way it's worked previously. I have to assume then assume that Microsoft has actively attempted to make the SP1 disk anti-consumer.

    What you're saying is I have to install and validate my copy of XP before I can install Win7? Every time? I mean, the reason I didn't buy an OEM (which is cheaper) copy of it, and why I bought the Full copy of XP the last time, was the license was transferable. It seems to me what you're saying is that MS has gone through a rather large amount of effort to make installing the upgrade as difficult as possible? I'm glad I've paid for all my copies of windows and didn't just get the easily-had and fully functional warez versions out there.

    I'm looking forward to Windows 8, where I have to install XP, so I can install Win 7, so I can install Windows 8...

     
    Please read the last paragraph of my previous response.
     
    Installing an OS is a very different proposition to installing an upgrade to a program - and lines have to be drawn somewhere.
    By definition, any installation of Windows 7 as an upgrade to XP is a Custom install, and the 'approved' method is to boot to the existing XP installation, and upgrade from there.
    If you don't  (understandably) want to do that, there are workarounds that I linked to  - only one of which is supported by MS.
     
     

    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth
    • Marked as answer by Project Mercy Tuesday, June 12, 2012 7:10 PM
    Tuesday, June 12, 2012 6:26 PM

All replies

  • 1. Basic procedure is described here

    http://windows.microsoft.com/en-US/windows7/help/upgrading-from-windows-xp-to-windows-7

    2. Here you will learn the upgrade paths

    http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd772579(v=ws.10).aspx

    3. When nothing helps, I recommend to contact Activation Center here

    http://support.microsoft.com/kb/950929/en-us

    Regards

    Milos

    Tuesday, June 12, 2012 6:24 AM
  • "Project Mercy" wrote in message
    news:d04458fb-d658-4e5d-b233-2f5b8c4590f3...
    I have a computer that died. It had a full retail version of Windows XP on
    it. I purchased Win7 Home Prem Sp1 Upgrade from Newegg along with basically
    all new parts to fix it. The drive is new. I tried installing Win 7 in a
    custom install with a new partition, and the key is flagged as invalid. If I
    chose skip and try to activate it once Windows is installed, it notifies me
    that the key doesn't work on a clean install.
     
    This is completely contrary to the "Upgrading from Windows XP?" flyer inside
    the packaging, not to mention it's contrary to the last 2 non-SP1 upgrades
    I've done from XP which worked perfectly fine in this regard.
     
     
     
     
    No - it's exactly what is supposed to happen.
    Windows 7 Upgrades check the licensing PRIOR to install, unlike most earlier
    versions of windows.
    You are supposed to install from within the Activated and Validated
    installation even when doing a Custom/clean install.
     
    You can however work around this where the machine does hold a valid license
    for a qualifying license.
    see
    http://www.winsupersite.com/article/windows-7/clean-install-windows-7-with-upgrade-media
     
     
     
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    "Project Mercy" wrote in message
    news:d04458fb-d658-4e5d-b233-2f5b8c4590f3...
    style=3D"BORDER-BOTTOM-COLOR: #000000; BORDER-LEFT: #000000 4px solid;=20
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    I have a computer that died. It had a full retail version of Windows =

    XP=20
    on
    it. I purchased Win7 Home Prem Sp1 Upgrade from Newegg along with =
    basically=20
    all
    new parts to fix it. The drive is new. I tried installing Win 7 in a =
    custom
    install with a new partition, and the key is flagged as invalid. If I =
    chose=20
    skip
    and try to activate it once Windows is installed, it notifies me that =
    the=20
    key
    doesn't work on a clean install.

    This is completely contrary to the "Upgrading from Windows XP?" flyer =

     
    inside
    the packaging, not to mention it's contrary to the last 2 non-SP1 =
    upgrades=20
    I've
    done from XP which worked perfectly fine in this regard.

     

     
    No - it's exactly what is supposed to happen.
    Windows 7 Upgrades check the licensing PRIOR to install, unlike =
    most
    earlier versions of windows.
    You are supposed to install from within the Activated and Validated
    installation even when doing a Custom/clean install.
     
    You can however work around this where the machine does hold a =
    valid
    license for a qualifying license.
    see
    title=3Dhttp://www.winsupersite.com/article/windows-7/clean-install-windo=
    ws-7-with-upgrade-media
    href=3D"http://www.winsupersite.com/article/windows-7/clean-install-windo=
    ws-7-with-upgrade-media">http://www.winsupersite.com/article/windows-7/cl=
    ean-install-windows-7-with-upgrade-media
     
     
     
    </BODY></HTML>
     
     

    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth
    Tuesday, June 12, 2012 5:31 PM
  • This makes no sense to me. I have Photoshop CS4. When I bought the upgrade to it. I ran it, it asked for my old key, I put the key in, it unlocked. I didn't have to install CS2, so I could install CS3, so I could install CS4, so I could install CS5. I have an upgrade of Word 2010. It asked for the old CD. I put it in, it unlocked.

    I have 5 machines that I maintain. 4 had XP, one had vista on it. The vista copy was full. I threw a new HD in when I did the upgrade to Win7 Pro. It didn't ask for a disk, it just installed and activated. I bought a full copy of Win7 Pro, and of course it worked fine. Over the next few months I upgraded 2 more of the XP machines. Home Premium. New hard disks, no issues.  Now.. after 3 upgrades, suddenly I have the "Sp1" disk, and it doesn't work the same way it's worked previously. I have to assume then assume that Microsoft has actively attempted to make the SP1 disk anti-consumer.

    What you're saying is I have to install and validate my copy of XP before I can install Win7? Every time? I mean, the reason I didn't buy an OEM (which is cheaper) copy of it, and why I bought the Full copy of XP the last time, was the license was transferable. It seems to me what you're saying is that MS has gone through a rather large amount of effort to make installing the upgrade as difficult as possible? I'm glad I've paid for all my copies of windows and didn't just get the easily-had and fully functional warez versions out there.

    I'm looking forward to Windows 8, where I have to install XP, so I can install Win 7, so I can install Windows 8...

    Tuesday, June 12, 2012 6:04 PM
  • "Project Mercy" wrote in message news:8a31055f-018c-49d3-b1ff-c2602fa5590c...

    This makes no sense to me. I have Photoshop CS4. When I bought the upgrade to it. I ran it, it asked for my old key, I put the key in, it unlocked. I didn't have to install CS2, so I could install CS3, so I could install CS4, so I could install CS5. I have an upgrade of Word 2010. It asked for the old CD. I put it in, it unlocked.

    I have 5 machines that I maintain. 4 had XP, one had vista on it. The vista copy was full. I threw a new HD in when I did the upgrade to Win7 Pro. It didn't ask for a disk, it just installed and activated. I bought a full copy of Win7 Pro, and of course it worked fine. Over the next few months I upgraded 2 more of the XP machines. Home Premium. New hard disks, no issues.  Now.. after 3 upgrades, suddenly I have the "Sp1" disk, and it doesn't work the same way it's worked previously. I have to assume then assume that Microsoft has actively attempted to make the SP1 disk anti-consumer.

    What you're saying is I have to install and validate my copy of XP before I can install Win7? Every time? I mean, the reason I didn't buy an OEM (which is cheaper) copy of it, and why I bought the Full copy of XP the last time, was the license was transferable. It seems to me what you're saying is that MS has gone through a rather large amount of effort to make installing the upgrade as difficult as possible? I'm glad I've paid for all my copies of windows and didn't just get the easily-had and fully functional warez versions out there.

    I'm looking forward to Windows 8, where I have to install XP, so I can install Win 7, so I can install Windows 8...

     
    Please read the last paragraph of my previous response.
     
    Installing an OS is a very different proposition to installing an upgrade to a program - and lines have to be drawn somewhere.
    By definition, any installation of Windows 7 as an upgrade to XP is a Custom install, and the 'approved' method is to boot to the existing XP installation, and upgrade from there.
    If you don't  (understandably) want to do that, there are workarounds that I linked to  - only one of which is supported by MS.
     
     

    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth
    • Marked as answer by Project Mercy Tuesday, June 12, 2012 7:10 PM
    Tuesday, June 12, 2012 6:26 PM
  • Yes, I've read that article. Option 1 doesn't work. Option 2 is a registry hack that, as pointed out, isn't sanctioned by MS and is likely to result in errors later. If it was a machine I had locally, I would do it, but it's my grandmothers and she's not prone to dealing with error messages well. Option 3 involves a double install, which leaves odd stuff around, again, problems for people who freak out (literally hyperventilating) when anything changes on them.

    My point is this. I bought an upgrade copy of the software. That means I'm upgrading my license. I'm not upgrading my hard disk. I don't want to upgrade my hard disk. The Non SP1 disk worked perfectly fine in this regard. The SP1 disk does not. It even says on the box "If you are upgrading from Windows XP or certain versions of Windows VIsta, you will need to back up your files and settings, perform a clean install and then re-install your existing files, settings, and programs." So, CLEARLY, this is a license upgrade, since it can't even do an in-line upgrade. 

    I appreciate your link to the page even if it's not as useful to me. I disagree with your statement that installing an OS is any different from any other piece of software. I've been installing MS OSes since MS DOS 2.11. Software is software. Due to the fact that its hard to stop people from copying physical media, people have resorted to other methods including License Keys to determine the uniqueness of a piece of software. Irrelivent of MS' poor business practice of allowing OEMs to deal with installs willy-nilly, is the fact that the License Key is unique and specific. If you're concerned about whether an upgrade is valid or not, lock the upgraded key to the old key. Problem solved. So to why MS won't do it, I don't know and I don't care. What I do care about is that I have to spend an hour installing and validating a copy of XP, purely because someone decided they can't check the validity or uniqueness of your old key.

    Tuesday, June 12, 2012 7:01 PM
  • "Project Mercy" wrote in message news:02bb848e-8602-463e-acea-e2b06a6b7ff3...

    Yes, I've read that article. Option 1 doesn't work. Option 2 is a registry hack that, as pointed out, isn't sanctioned by MS and is likely to result in errors later. If it was a machine I had locally, I would do it, but it's my grandmothers and she's not prone to dealing with error messages well. Option 3 involves a double install, which leaves odd stuff around, again, problems for people who freak out (literally hyperventilating) when anything changes on them.

    My point is this. I bought an upgrade copy of the software. That means I'm upgrading my license. I'm not upgrading my hard disk. I don't want to upgrade my hard disk. The Non SP1 disk worked perfectly fine in this regard. The SP1 disk does not. It even says on the box "If you are upgrading from Windows XP or certain versions of Windows VIsta, you will need to back up your files and settings, perform a clean install and then re-install your existing files, settings, and programs." So, CLEARLY, this is a license upgrade, since it can't even do an in-line upgrade.

    I appreciate your link to the page even if it's not as useful to me. I disagree with your statement that installing an OS is any different from any other piece of software. I've been installing MS OSes since MS DOS 2.11. Software is software. Due to the fact that its hard to stop people from copying physical media, people have resorted to other methods including License Keys to determine the uniqueness of a piece of software. Irrelivent of MS' poor business practice of allowing OEMs to deal with installs willy-nilly, is the fact that the License Key is unique and specific. If you're concerned about whether an upgrade is valid or not, lock the upgraded key to the old key. Problem solved. So to why MS won't do it, I don't know and I don't care. What I do care about is that I have to spend an hour installing and validating a copy of XP, purely because someone decided they can't check the validity or uniqueness of your old key.

    An OS is a very different proposition to an ordinary software upgrade for a number of reasons - and specifically in the case of XP-to-Win7 it's moreso.
    ALL upgrades from XP to Win7 are Clean installs - there are no viable remains of the old OS (except in an windows.old folder that may be created, which can only be used for data-recovery or uninstall purposes).
     
    You don't have to install XP at all - the double-install method works win7-on-win7 without any trace of XP. The Win7 installs take around 20-30 minutes each on modern machines (even modest ones such as the VM's I use, with 1 GB of RAM - they are much quicker than an XP install)
     
     

    Noel Paton | Nil Carborundum Illegitemi | CrashFixPC | The Three-toed Sloth
    Tuesday, June 12, 2012 7:51 PM