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File permissions in Windows 7 - "Take Ownership" reports success but I can't access my files

    Question

  • I am experiencing difficulty getting at my files.

    I have used the "Take Ownership" registry hacks (which open a command window) on files and/or folders, and I get a "SUCCESS" message each time; however, I still cannot access the files.

    I can copy the files, and the proper permissions get set on the copies ... but I have several hundred gigs of files and not enough disk space left to do that, to say nothing of having to rename the files.  Strange thing is, after I copy a file, I can delete the original file ... but still not "execute" it (double-click; the app that owns that type of file opens, but reports that it can't get access to the file).

    I set UAC to "off" (lowest setting) and am trying the "Take Ownership" thing again to see if that makes a difference; in the meantime, has anyone else experienced this problem?
    Friday, May 08, 2009 7:44 PM

All replies

  • I have had a very simular experience.  I too wanted to delete some files in the Windows directory; namely some of the .jpg files for the Desktop Themes located in the Windows/Web directory.  Prior to that I had taken ownership of (what I thought in it's entirety) the C:\ directory so that I could add a shortcut to the SendTo folder.  Further on when I went to delete those .jpg files it said that I did not have permission.  Apparently, just taking ownership of the C:\ directory did not grant me complete permission over the entire directory including the Windows/Web directory.  The only way I could delete those files was to assume ownership of the subfolders that the .jpg files were in. 

    I wouldn't recommend what I did to anyone.  I have reason to believe that it somehow messed up the WMI so that the Event Viewer does not start.
    • Proposed as answer by Joseph_Scott1 Friday, December 30, 2011 10:02 PM
    Saturday, May 09, 2009 3:29 AM
  • After you took ownership did you also reconfigure the Permissions and Auditing in the Advanced Security Settings?

    Saturday, May 09, 2009 3:57 PM
  • After you took ownership did you also reconfigure the Permissions and Auditing in the Advanced Security Settings?


    No I didn't. 

    I simply gave up and took the "easy" route -- copying all my files (400+ gigs) (I'm a digital photographer) from my backups into my account folders.

    Here's the thing:  this should not happen in the first place.  If it does happen, something MUST be done to make it easier for the average user to gain access to his/her files.  It is far too complex, as your post points out .. probably 85+% of people will never think to do those things; they'll give up, and either fallback to XP, or ... I don't know, install some version of Linux instead? 

    Either way, this is a problem.  By the time users find out that they can't access their files in a fairly simple way, they'll have already bought the product .. so Microsoft isn't losing customers directly; unfortunately, the customer will have a negative experience, and that ain't right :) .
    Saturday, May 09, 2009 4:21 PM
  • " Either way, this is a problem.  By the time users find out that they can't access their files in a fairly simple way, they'll have already bought the product .. so Microsoft isn't losing customers directly; unfortunately, the customer will have a negative experience, and that ain't right :) . "

    I don't know about that.  After I took possession of tne C:\ directory I went back configured Permissions (making sure I was on the Permissions list) with all the inherited permissions.  I then did the same thing for the Auditing section.  Rebooted (probably didn't have to) came back and was able to delete almost everything that I wanted.  Of course if any of the Windows Processes or Services were using a particular file it couldn't be deleted so I had to click "Skip".

    Saturday, May 09, 2009 4:35 PM
  • I am most likely having a highly similar security issue.  I have tried all methods of taking ownership and setting custom permissions.  All to no avail.  However, I may have some extra information to add here.  The drive I am having difficulty with is a storage drive that was previously mounted in a Windows XP Professional SP3 workstation to store files; no operating system files.  The boot drive is separate and prepared with the Windows 7 installer, it runs just fine. The main system drive (boot drive) I did a complete cleaning prior to installing Windows 7 RC using DiskPart.  The Diskpart tool, part of Server 2003 resource kit tools, is a very powerful disk management Utility.  Drives prepared with this program show as uninitialized; I strongly recommend such a cleaning to remove all possible problems especially when changing OS technologies or when reinstalling a system after a rootkit-that-survives-a-format infection). I have no issues with security on the boot drive.
     
    Before you suggest various solutions, know that I am an IT Consultant and I have 27 years experience.  I am looking for specific Windows 7 issues and hotfixes pertaining precisely to this issue.  I have already applied the Root Ownership hotfix from KB970789; it did not resolve this issue on the storage drive. The second drive was NOT formatted, or cleaned prior to mounting in the Windows 7 system.  That drive contains over a million documents and other information.  I specifically mounted it to test the Libraries functions and the efficiency of the indexing system in Windows 7.
     
    I would really appreciate some ideas in this matter.  I should be able to help others with problems in return.

    I strongly suggest that you clean your boot disks properly when you install a new OS technology.  Sometimes there are markers and partitioning information that may have issues with a new OS.
    Computer software consultant for 27 years
    Monday, May 11, 2009 4:44 PM
  • I have tried all methods of taking ownership and setting custom permissions. 
    I know you didn't want to hear obvious answers, but it sounds familiar to a problem I was having. Check the sharing options. Go to a folder on the external drive, Right click > sharing > specific people. Delete the unknown contacts and then share the folder.
    Monday, May 11, 2009 11:17 PM
  • I cannot even view the properties of the said drive, ACCESS DENIED  Windows XP can view it, and do anything to it, but after taking ownership in Win7, and one reboot, poof again, back to ACCESS DENIED.  This is an internally mounted storage volume, not a removable drive. and not a shared volume on another system.

    I repeated all the steps precisely that I do that is sucessful in WinXP Pro, and the dialogs open and close and the files stream past as the permissions and supposedly the onwership changes, but to no avail. ACCESS DENIED after I am informed the process was sucessful.   This has to be a major system bug on Windows 7.  I am by no means unfamiliar to Windows OS, I do consulting, I can manually remove viruses and rootkits, and manually edit the registry on a system, this is very basic stuff, it simply does not work.

    Computer software consultant for 27 years
    • Proposed as answer by BlazeH Friday, May 15, 2009 3:30 PM
    Friday, May 15, 2009 12:56 AM
  • I fully AGREE! The "user" or "Administrator" of the OS should have FULL control over EVERYTHING on their computer by just setting one switch instead of going though all this "Ownership", "Priviledges" and "Auditing" stuff. I do understand that the average uses has no need or desire to have full access to everything but a personal choice is prefered , in my opinion. I like to have the control of deleting or changing everything or anything I want. If I mess up, then it is my problem. This needs to beaddressed in Windows 7.
    Friday, May 15, 2009 3:39 PM
  • Hi. I have same problem but with mi corporative account with administrative rights as the local user on my D: partition. This problem was present two days after include my Portatile on the corporative network. I will change permissions, propietary, checkout of the Directoy, ingres again without results.

    Friday, May 15, 2009 10:58 PM
  • Hello

    this is for everybody who has sometimes rights problem.
    I see that Since i installed Windows 7, some folders have been "Saved".
    So that nobody can access them, but to subfolders.
    Think this is a new "Security"-Feature (not a bug ...) to avoid Programs to gain information of a computer because of some standards.

    Here just what i saw because it't maybe usefull:

    Go to the Properties of the folder that you have problems (maybe also a file or something)
    Check if there is a user called "Everyone" with some Special Rights.

    If yes, there could be the problem...

    Sometimes Windows 7 put following rule:
    Everyone Deny to List Folder/Read Data

    Just delete this Everyone Deny, press three times ok and that's it.

    Just a little list of Folders that had the permission set to this strange Everyone deny:
    %Systemroot%\Documents and Settings
    %Systemroot%\Users\%username%\Local Settings


    I think that with this security another programm cannot spoof in local Settings what for programs you use... because he need to know the path below.


    I AGREE absolutely that a Administrators should have full control of the data but not the "User". But normal on a Windows 7 you have the rights you need.

    Regards:

    Dani
    Sunday, May 17, 2009 4:34 PM
  • Well I am glad it is not just me!

    I have a situation where I have installed XP Mode and completed a system restore because of some issues with USB drivers. Unfortunately, the installer left one folder in the Program Files with three files.

    After the system restore, the only owner is the SYSTEM and all attempt to take ownershop with the TAKEOWN command have been fruitless. I cannot delete these files, add permissions, take ownership or virtually anything to these files.

    As a last resort, I have managed to CUT them and move them to a mapped drive on another PC and then delete them.

    Quite frustrating to say the least!

    I am completing some Win 7 Logo testing and have other little strange things like this happen like the program installing but not applying permissions to the current (Administrator) user.

    I will document fully and post the results when I get them.

    Cheers
    Dave
    Sunday, May 17, 2009 11:35 PM
  • Sorry, update to the above. I didn't manage to CUT them, they stayed exactly where I left them but copied them instead. Just to prove I wasn't going mad, I tried again and the same thing happened. I have managed to take ownership of the folder but not to the contents.

    I have also found that apparently, I need permission off myself to delete the file (???) I am the only user on the system (As an administrator) and the meessage now appears "You require permission from PCNAME\USER to make changes to this file". I am that very person.

    Cheers

    ***UPDATE***
    After much fiddling about, I have managed to finally delete my files. After a reboot, I was able to right click and change the ownership "normally" delete the previous owner (SYSTEM) and add me with full control permissions. It has only taken me three hours to delete 3 files!

    Huray!!!
    • Edited by DJT_UK Monday, May 18, 2009 1:36 AM Yet another update!!
    Sunday, May 17, 2009 11:46 PM
  • Seems like you had a problem with the Harddisk, sometimes when my disk had corrupted files, i couldn't change the security settings, sometimes this tab was also missing.
    Like this i think after a reboot he corrected some problems on the drive... maybe.

    Now it's working, coool :D
    Monday, May 18, 2009 5:18 AM
  • Hi All. I am looking for a solution to a similar issue. Here's my story:

    My hard disk had two partitions - one had vista installed on it (been using it for a year), and on the other I installed WIN7RC1. I also had a second hard disk called MEDIA which had all my, er..., media.

    I had a dual boot environment in which I predominantly used WIN7 for a while and then decided to move back to Vista - still keeping the dual boot setup. When I moved back to VISTA I noticed a couple of changes:

    1. All files and folders in my MEDIA  drive had only "READ ONLY" attribute set. Tried various things including logging in as administrator and enabling "Full Control" access to all "Users". Some folders were set right, but on just one, the "READ ONLY" attribute just wouldn't go away - call this the rogue folder. Take ownership(recursive) too reports success.

    2. I noticed a new account (Just the SID, no user name) that show up  in the "Group or user names" box under "Security" context menu of the rogue folder. This SID corresponds to the account created under WIN7

    Has anyone made similar observations?

    All "well behaved" folders show the following in their "Security->Group or user names" box:

    authenticated users
    system
    administrators
    users

    The rogue folder shows (conrad is the sole account on both Vista and WIN7):

    system
    unknown (S-1-5-21-YYYYYYYYY...)
    administrators
    conrad


    Why is the user list looking so different? Also, note that under Vista and WIN7 I had created an user accounts with the same name ("conrad").

    Thanks in advance,
    Conrad
    Tuesday, May 19, 2009 6:26 AM
  • Athnetius, that seems to be the exact problem I was describing in my earlier post on this topic.

    I presume you have had the "media" folder shared at some point.

    Easy to fix.  First take ownership of the 'media' folder, remembering to check the box to also replace owner on subcontainers and objects.  Give your user "Full control" access to the folder.

    Then right click the 'media' folder and select 'share with' and select 'specific people'.  Remove the unknown contact, and make sure you are shown as the owner, and everyone has read only permission, and then click share.
    Tuesday, May 19, 2009 8:56 AM
  • Thanks Stickywulf.

    I took ownership of the folder and gave myself full control. The process completed successfully - The properties dialog shows the right ownership (my_pc_name\my_user_name)

    I didn't need to share the folder - I can't figure why you suggested that.

    Now, it looks like I do have complete permissions for all files. Folders still seem to have the read only flag set, but I guess there is some valid explanation - I can live that.

    -Conrad
    Tuesday, May 19, 2009 3:05 PM
  • Athnetius,

    I experimented some more and think I found a better solution.  Sharing the folder does work, but I think you are just wanting to change permission. 
    Essentially the difference here being that you previously had read/write permission for the specific user "Conrad" while now you will be giving read/write permission to general "users".

    First up - Take ownership of the folder (which you've already done).

    Right click the folder and choose "properties".
    Click the "security" tab and then click "edit" and then click "add" and then click "advanced"
    Click "object types" and then tick "groups" and then click "ok" and then click "find now"
    Scroll to the bottom of the list and then highlight "Users" and then click "ok". "ok"
    Highlight "users" and tick the boxes for "read" and "write" (and any other permissions you want).
    Click "ok" "ok"

    I hope this works for yourself.  At the very least, I believe I now know how this permissions works for myself.
    Thursday, May 21, 2009 12:30 AM
  • Well, I have tried the sharing suggestion, and to no avail.

    I just thought I would post a short update.

    I also have noticed another folder that I cannot delete, called Window.old, which I find strange since I did a fresh installation.  Whatever I try, it will not go away.  I believe this to be related to my previous issue.  I do hope that Microsoft has assigned someone who actually reads these forum posts and makes note or logs them for review.
    Computer software consultant for 27 years
    Saturday, May 23, 2009 9:33 PM
  • yes, this tends to happen if you dual boot with a system that does not take ownershipes, i.e you dualboot with xp or lower, with xp installed first,
    boot in xp, try and open the file, if it opens, your on the right track for taking the ownership, if you CAN open it, :
    select all the files, riught click, make sure its NOT READ ONLY, then set to share folders, if it asks to move them, click NO

    if you CANT open it, then boot back into windows 7, right click the files,  click sercurty, then something along the lines off "permissions" (sorry, my windows 7 is down for a while, so i cant check to see where it is )
    remove everyone as permissionsm then click add, then click advance, then click add/new, then select all, give everything permission, then reset,

    you shuold now be able to open/ successfully take permission of the files :)
    Wednesday, May 27, 2009 6:15 PM
  • kk, how about making the folder only editable by you, and nnot by system?.. this can be done, except if its windows files or a file that the system is using/needs, it will take the ownership again,try it, denied acces to system and also stop it archiving, indexing and compressing?

    Jimmy:

    its looks like someone did there research? how you know my name? o.O ......
    Wednesday, May 27, 2009 6:48 PM
  • I'll consider it:  However, given that the op system is dropping bombs at the root level, I really doubt (especially since bugs don't even follow rules even if there were one) it needs system access permission to do it.  It drops a bomb from within an "up" operating system, via "triggers" or sometimes without any obvious trigger right down to the ultimate places where all fixes "above" it mean nothing:  The root system.

    As to your name, wildly lucky guess.  Unlucky at Op systems, lucky at name guessing, I suppose.
    Wednesday, May 27, 2009 7:24 PM
  • UPDATE:  If you are an x32 user for whom the hotfix doesn't restore access to your drives, or an x64 user who gets completely locked out of their drives (repeatedly), 100.000000000% you might consider twittering @BrandonLive.

    Here's what I know:  1) I've been working with PCs since 1976, and I'm d*** sure that I'm capable of understanding when I'm TOTALLY locked out of my own drives, and when the drives will totally lock me out again after I've spent !@#$#@#$ time manually restoring access.

    2) I know that there appears to be no help for those in 7100+ x64 who get totally and randomly locked out of their own drives, with all their permissions reset.  I know that reasonable google searches demonstrate that MS has not acknowledged the issue.

    3) I know that Vista was a complete debacle not necessarily because the op system sucked the whole time, but because the perception that it sucked.  I further know that only at the very end did MS even start to grasp the concept of how real world users talk about an op system when they perceive it sucks, and that real world op system end users generally have an understanding of op systems one level above my pets.

    4) I know that whether he is or not, by his "tweets" which want to address anything -but- the fact that 7100++ is locking SOME users totally out of their drives, repeatedly, that @BrandonLive APPEARS to be an MS employee who demonstrates the living embodyment of why Vista failed (See 3).

    5) I know d*** well how the press works.  I know that if MS and/or its employees a) have more mature builds that suck FAR worse than previous builds; and b) pretend that all problems with the op system are "end user failures" and are problems with the user, and it's the user who has the problem, that the problem will absolutely demonstrate itself most obviously in MS' bottom line, when Win7 fails as badly as Vista, because MS does exactly the same thing with the op system release that they did with Vista, but expects a different result.

    I know that if MS APPEARS to 7100+ probs like @BrandonLive APPEARS to, that MS is "pulling a chrysler/general motors," i.e., "we build what we want, we think it's great, and we don't give rat's assets about what you think."

    6) I know that I now have semi-permanent access to my drives, that MS was ZERO help in resolving the problem.  I know that "throwing things against the wall" worked.  I know that most of my "fixes" were TOTALLY unrelated to the problem, as well as many if not most of my theories what the problem is.  I know that bad press against MS and Win7 led me to roads of various things to throw against the wall at this catastrophic 7100 problem, and that one or more of the things that I threw against the wall has kept the problem at bay.

    But once again, here's what I know.  I know that I don't want to be denied 100.00% access to my drives, over and over again despite manually fixing the problem.  I know that other users don't want the same.  I know that the average user, with maybe 10% the experience with PCs as I, will RUSH to tell 20 other potential users that the op system sucks, whether it does or not, the first time they get totally locked out of every file they have on their computer; or experience anything anything remotely as catastrophic in final release.

    7) In sum, what I know is that my ONLY apparent contact from MS on my catastrophic problem with 7100 has been basically "shut up, Win7 has no problem, you're the problem in bad mouthing the perfect Windows 7 Release Candidate.  All the problems are in your head, and with you."  I know that basically being told I'm the problem did nothing to restore ANY access to my drives or files.

    MS tried "Fix the End-User instead of the op system" before:  It was called "Vista."  It didn't work out terribly well for the company.  So perhaps they might want to try taking some of the efforts to get bad-mouthers of Win7 who get hit with catastrophic failures toward, oh, I dunno, acknowledging and fixing the operating system instead of "fixing the end-user."

    So in the end, if this thread or this post magically disappear after you've seen/read/followed them, please make that a PRIMARY consideration on how MS is going to handle actual Win7 potentially catastrophic problems upon actual release, and whether you should spend a real dollar on it upon release.
    Saturday, May 30, 2009 6:45 PM
  • Small update.

    The hotfix released by Windows Update on the x86 platform, does not work, period.  The bug is still there, and it will not go away.  The only way to remove it is to wipe COMPLETELY the data from the affectedvolumes.  The ONLY way to sucessfully prepare a drive, not a partition, or a volume, but a drive, is through Diskpart, using another older OS,  before you install windows 7.

    1) Mount the drive on a Windows server 2003, or XP Professional with the Server 2003 Tools installed, and utilize the Diskpart tool to thouroughly clean the affected drive.  WARNING: the "clean" command will effectively remove absolutely any semblence of data, partitions, and wolumes across en ENTIRE disk in less than 5 seconds!!

    2) Run Diskpart
        a) open Windows Disk MAnagement and note CAREFULLY the drive you have connected to the system and see which disk number it is.  Yes, you may use an external USB method for mounting to use this method.
        b) Run Diskpart.
        c) enter the following commands:
            i)  list disk  (note the disk that has the '*' next to the name and note the number of the disk you wish to clean.
            ii) select #  (type the number of the disk you wish to clean.  Please make sure you have not selected the wrong disk)
           iii) list disk  (run the list command again and verify that you have selected the correct volume, be 500% certain.. LOL)
           iii) clean      (please be certain that you have selected the correct disk before you proceed)
           iv) exit        (in Disk Management you see that the disk is so clean, it is not even initialized yet)

    3) Remove the disk physically from the XP Pro or Win 2003 Server system and reconnect it into the Windows 7 machine

    4) Install Windows 7 and you will have no problems with the root drive anymore.  Try to avoid using this system on a network with older technologies from Microsoft.

    A Word of warning, any drives that you connect (how you connect seems randomly affected for some reason) that already have data from other systems, are likely to have the Root Security Bug reappear again after one reboot with the drive connected in a Windows 7 environment.  I strongly advise that you keep windows 7 away from other machines on a network until this issue is resolved sucessfully.  If you have no data to worry about on your Win 7 test system, then go ahead and play with netowrking.  You will , or should, be fine with any data created originaly within the Win 7 system, or with data accessed and downloded via FTP, HTTP, or HTTPS network connections.  I have not tested drive images transferred from other systems. I have not tested folders transferred from a Vista or XP system via VPN connections, or over higher than 128bit connections.  Rule nothing out, and suspect everything related to logon, keys, user verification, and any Windows 7 level technology that deals with file or volume permissions and authentication until this issue has been resolved.
    IT Consultant for 27 years Currently work in the field 5 days out of 7, 12 hours a day minimum. I like my work. "Nothing in the world is more dangerous than sincere ignorance and conscientious stupidity." --Martin Luther King, Jr.
    Tuesday, June 09, 2009 9:59 AM

  • Update:

    Ok, the bug is definitely related to the new UAC system in Windows 7.  After extensive testing and experimentation, I have noticed that the symptoms completely vanish if the UAC is completely disabled.  Any other setting and the mysterious "bug" comes back.  I was able to completely do what I wanted to do, and view and change any settings edit permissions and change ownership and auditing with the UAC completely disabled.  The changes remained permanent and effective.  The minute I enabled, even slightly, the UAC then ACCESS DENIED and the inability to view properties or see effective changes reared its ugly head once again.

    I have not had issues with this bug for isolated Windows 7 systems.  No issues with Windows 7 systems installed on properly cleaned drives and not linked to other older Microsoft operating systems via a local network.  Once you change (pollute?) your installation by adding another drive from a another OS, dual boot with another OS, or start to mess around with locally networked systems with older versions of Windows, the Windows 7 Permissions Bug has a strong chance of coming back.  No evidence of the bug with networked Apple computers, or Linux computers.

    If you completely disable UAC, unless you have already changed too many things, the Windows 7 Permissions Bug should disappear.


    IT Consultant for 27 years Currently work in the field 5 days out of 7, 12 hours a day minimum. I like my work. "Nothing in the world is more dangerous than sincere ignorance and conscientious stupidity." --Martin Luther King, Jr.
    Friday, June 12, 2009 12:57 PM

  • Update:

    Ok, the bug is definitely related to the new UAC system in Windows 7.  After extensive testing and experimentation, I have noticed that the symptoms completely vanish if the UAC is completely disabled.  Any other setting and the mysterious "bug" comes back.  I was able to completely do what I wanted to do, and view and change any settings edit permissions and change ownership and auditing with the UAC completely disabled.  The changes remained permanent and effective.  The minute I enabled, even slightly, the UAC then ACCESS DENIED and the inability to view properties or see effective changes reared its ugly head once again.

    I have not had issues with this bug for isolated Windows 7 systems.  No issues with Windows 7 systems installed on properly cleaned drives and not linked to other older Microsoft operating systems via a local network.  Once you change (pollute?) your installation by adding another drive from a another OS, dual boot with another OS, or start to mess around with locally networked systems with older versions of Windows, the Windows 7 Permissions Bug has a strong chance of coming back.  No evidence of the bug with networked Apple computers, or Linux computers.

    If you completely disable UAC, unless you have already changed too many things, the Windows 7 Permissions Bug should disappear.


    IT Consultant for 27 years Currently work in the field 5 days out of 7, 12 hours a day minimum. I like my work. "Nothing in the world is more dangerous than sincere ignorance and conscientious stupidity." --Martin Luther King, Jr.
    • Proposed as answer by paulvance Saturday, April 16, 2011 1:36 PM
    Friday, June 12, 2009 1:08 PM
  • Kieseyhow,
    Thanks for all your testing and input. I only discovered the problem when I wanted to run scanpst.exe in an effort to address a minor problem with Outlook. I read this thread, turned off UAC, took ownership and it worked. I have not turned UAC back on and will take your word for the outcome. You said:

    "Once you change (pollute?) your installation by adding another drive from a another OS, dual boot with another OS, or start to mess around with locally networked systems with older versions of Windows, the Windows 7 Permissions Bug has a strong chance of coming back."

    Most installations will run into one or more of the configurations you describe. Most often "locally networked systems ith older versions of Windows" I am dual booting with Vista and have 2 XP computers on the local network. I will watch the thread and hope someone advises if a fix becomes available.

    Thanks again for all your efforts and information.

    Earon
    Sunday, June 14, 2009 12:15 AM
  • Yes well I had downloaded 7100 which is what MS is sending now.  Have it working "fine" on my main desktop workstation with some in progress exceptions. 

    The real problem came when I tried to update a fairly new laptop from Vista to W7.  I ended up having no start menu from the start.  I have looked everywhere and tried everything that I could think of with only temporary success.  All the items in the start menu disappear although what they reference is actually there in both the disk locations for all users and user without change.  I also lost most of my "user" directory that was on the system prior to the update and couldn't restore things like thunderbird from the user directory files as they were gone both from the new user folder and the windows.old ect folders.  So alas I tried to reinstall windows 7 as a new install.  Low and behold I had a start menu with all the items in it.  As I was not able to even launch some files like firefox install that were on the drive I tried to take ownership and alter permissions.  So many of the newer interface features are inspired by Linux I am thinking the security permissions system Linux/Unix employs should be at least an option for users. Strangely some files wouldn't allow me to take ownership so I just "skipped" them.  I was able to do the install of most things.   I then tried to clean up permissions and experiment regarding the "disappearing start menu" by setting everything on the C: drive to system and administrators.  Sometime during the course of the permissions changing I got considerably more messages saying I couldn't change the permissions on some files.  And before it completed my desktop icons disappeared and start menu went blank.....  Then I thought to reset all permissions on c: drive to system, administrators and my user account(just straight across full power no weaker user perms) this caused the desktop icons and the recently launched program icons on the start menu to reappear but the other items in the start menu are still gone.  Very very strange.  Just before this I was seriously thinking of dumping vista and Windows 7 in favor of XP as the speed performance is as good or better.  The computer in question does have an ability to run XP although the manufacturer doesn't support it per se.  I did think it was interesting that the resetting of the file permissions wiped out the start menu entries and will use that to try and figure out what they are doing.  Also thinking of activating the administrator account -( net user administrator /active:yes from the command prompt) ... launching a shell and administrator spawned explorer.exe or switching to the user administrator -- being careful to deactivate the administrator afterwhich...  I suspect this might force the process to proceed properly.  Experiment taking over ownership as user and as admins/ et al. 

      This is a very serious mistake structurally MS is making when they should be reverting back to a less controlled stance and blasting forth to uncharted space by infusing the overall experience with customer benefits, making that the first goal, the primary goal. This includes a host of changes that seem benefit non MS os's but keeping in mind the first goal, the first rule really, it makes sense.    This current pathway seems clearly not done for the users interests.
    Monday, July 06, 2009 5:55 AM
  • I just noticed this, after looking in the UAC account help:

    "If you select this setting, you'll need to restart the computer to complete the process of turning off UAC. Once UAC is off, people that log on as administrator will always have the permissions of an administrator."

    This is the last part of the spiel that comes under the 'do not notify' setting of the UAC, along with the parts to remind you to restart to apply all the effects etc.

    Seems silly to me that the UAC actually prevents people who are logged on as the administrator from having the permissions of the administrator at all times, and yet apparently that's what it does.

    I've just disabled the UAC on my RC (7100) copy, but I haven't restarted yet.  If it solves the 'you need permissions from yourself' glitch (I can only assume this is a glitch, what idiot would program it that way in the first place?) that I had trying to delete stuff in the "program files" folders then I'll write it up here.

    UPDATE:
    No luck - absolutely no change whatsoever :(
    Strangely, I was looking at microsoft games as an example, and everything is deletable except the .jpg image.  Seems odd that only the image is protected from deletion - any ideas on that?
    Thursday, October 22, 2009 8:00 PM
  • Does anyone know if Mac OSX will run on a non-Apple PC? And how to do it? I'm fed up at last with windows 7 the retail version not allowing me to access my PC! Too many files and folders I'm not allowed to use!
    Tuesday, November 03, 2009 1:13 AM
  • Hello

    Of course it's possible, just look arround Google :P
    But this is a Microsoft board, please go to some apple boards.

    If you have really problem with accessing Files do the following:

    Right click => Properties => Security => Advanced => Owner => Take Ownership

    Whe you have done that, you should be able to put your username in the rights list ;-)
    Be sure you not only put the Administrators Group on the rights, this will not work, just put also your user or the users group ;-)

    Regards:
    Daniel
    Tuesday, November 03, 2009 7:23 PM
  • @ dani_wb How can you possibly delude yourself that it's as simple as that given all of the above posts? And even if that does work consistently (for you), do you really believe that it's a viable method to change the file permissions of every folder you want to access? One at a time? As for the OS X thing (if it doesn't work), you could always download Ubuntu instead (9.1 is, I believe, the current one (at time of writing)). I won't go so far as to provide a link, (although for all the response our questions are generating, I don't think M$ takes the least amount of notice of anything written here.) But I would always recommend having an alternative to Windows, just in case you get annoyed with it or if there's a mass virus attack or something random. It's probably worth learning how to use a linux distro for that eventuality. (I also have deep suspicions that in the light of M$ current generation of OSs, that should the general public realize there are appropriate alternatives, the empire would crumble :p) To lighter topics: Anyone resolved this issue at all?
    Thursday, November 05, 2009 8:12 PM
  • Maybe there is help at hand! [url=http://www.tomshardware.co.uk/windows-7-sp1-service-pack,news-32181.html]Windows 7 SP1[/url] Not for a while yet, and unfortunately it comes out after my RC starts shutting down every 2 hours :S.
    Thursday, November 05, 2009 9:29 PM
  • zsolmanz,
    As soon as I got notice of your post above, the link was disabled. What was it about?

    @ dani_wb,
    That advice doesn't work with many things. Plus, even if it did, it would still take months to achieve with my 6+ Terabytes of data.
    Friday, November 06, 2009 9:14 AM
  • It was just a link to a Tom's Hardware news bulletin about Windows 7 SP1, which should be out about 1/2 way through next year. Nothing special.
    Saturday, November 07, 2009 10:17 AM
  • I agree.....I have a brand new HP PC with Windows 7 installed. It worked fine for two weeks and then suddenly I am getting all kinds of file permission errors and I cannot access many of MY FILES. Files that I could access before suddenly are a problem. There were five automatic Windows updates on 11/11/09 on my PC prior to the problem. Don't know if they can be contributing to my problem. BUT THE BOTTOM LINE IS......it won't take me long to WISH I HAD MY OLD PC WITH WINDOWS XP BACK UP AND RUNNING!
    Friday, November 13, 2009 6:00 PM
  • My sister bought a brand-spanking-new HP laptop with Windows 7 installed.  I can't even tranfer the files over from my laptop using Vista and so far, the help on the internet has been so tortured in trying to deal with a simple file transfer that I advised her to return it straight-away and continue to rely on her MacBook Pro.

    Even Vista is better than this.  Nice one, Bill.  You've really impressed the ____ out of me again.
    Wednesday, November 18, 2009 10:13 PM
  • Stupid comment and not the same idea that most of the customers have.... even Linux users(some) is looking now win7 with other eyes...
    those who complaint too much about the security permissions must be sum kinda Lame looking for burling win7 security facilities...
    Regards,
    RR
    Wednesday, November 18, 2009 10:34 PM
  • Thanks for that comment, Ddos_Evader.  It's refreshing to have a different point of view, and it contributed so much to the thread.

    Renisans, is that a permissions problem?  Or a networking problem?  Because I've not had any trouble with networking (at least not directly between 2 Windows 7 installations, or my home network + internet).
    Have you tried setting up shared folders, then copying things into them so that they're available to the Windows 7 Laptop?  I suppose you don't have the HP latptop any more, but maybe that would help in future or with your Vista 'top..
    I'll assume you've tried everything there is easily available on the web so I can't help you much more.  Does Vista have a 'homegroup' setting for the network it's attached to?  Homegroup basically makes the computers in the network trusted, so that Windows 7 doesn't cr*p itself when it get's approached by any of them.  It's an OS with xenophobia :S

    The only other suggestion I can think of off the top of my head is to nab a portable HDD off a mate and use that to copy files to and from each laptop.  Sorry I can't be more helpful :(
    Or to use an online file storage site in the same way.  I don't know any examples - I don't use them.

    -zsolmanz
    Thursday, November 19, 2009 10:56 PM
  • try this out
    open an elevated command prompt
    **  ENSURE that you are in the correct users directory ** Run the following command:
    attrib –r –s –h /S /D

           This will remove the read-only, system, and hidden tags from all folders and subfolders in the directory.  Note that this must be performed from the command line because the same operation fails by design from the explorer GUI as described here:
    http://support.microsoft.com/default.aspx/kb/326549

    also use icacls to check your file's permission and paste it here for checking. thanks.

    Thursday, November 26, 2009 2:42 AM
  • I’ve been doing backups for the last year using xcopy in a bat file under Windows 7 RC without problems.  I put on Win7 Home Premium and now the copy dies after a few minutes with a denied access message.  If I simply drag and drop or edit/copy edit/past the directory it copies without problems.

     

    I found a PDF file I couldn’t open—access denied message, and right clicked it. I clicked share with/specific people and found myself as owner and an account names “unknown contact” which had read/write privileges.  If I clicked on properties/security there was an unidentified starting with S-1-5-21 etc. I went back and deleted the “unknown contact” and was able to open the pdf file successfully. Take ownership didn’t change the equation.

     

    Closing and opening the pdf file caused the S-1-5 etc guy to disappear.

     

    Does anyone have any idea what’s going on here? How do these funky accounts/permissions get set?

    Saturday, November 28, 2009 4:32 PM
  • i have an issue where a friend of mine experimented with my Windows 7 RC and changed to permissions. apperantly all the files on the C: drive are in accessable except for the Libraries (e.g. music, videos, my documents)...and desktop. Some programs dont respond and any action that requires permission in in-accessable. this includes even changing date and time.....i cant change ownership because the under the propertiess for the C: drive , i'm prompted with the "access denied/ no permission" prompt. i can copy files but not delete.

    I tried the command prompt "attrib –r –s –h /S /D"  but all lines said access denied....

    i also cant install or modify ANY programs and system restore isnt alowing a restore.

    can some one help...Please
    Saturday, November 28, 2009 7:45 PM
  • Ok ppl here is looking for 777 permissions which is not designed for windows 7 IMHO....i doubt ppl here also is having problems in deleting folders or files in the sub! that  is the easiest thing ever after u take ownership and attribute all the permissions for users!!! u might as well check if theres any user such as everyone set to deny in special permissions as mentioned above....
    ive done that several times in many dif folders ,root folders an all that stuff never have problems,obviously i did try all that for testing purposes then right after switch back to the standards...
    there is a security policy in GPO that u set to " elevate without prompting" just do that and u change the uac behaviour ,not somehing that i would advised but if u want to leave it all wide opened and accessible (Like XP)just do it,up to Yous...
    btw 777 permissions is a practice questioned by many security experts ,even if u isolate some root folders then apply 777 permissions even though its not something recommended and has some controversi(dunno how to spell that,lazy to google it )
    so before crapping the S hit outta UAC,rethink 10 times and look for other resources around internet to see the real deal with that!!!!
    windows 7 was designed to re educate win users to avoid certain practices that leaded older windows versions to s uck in security stuff IMHO...
    so whats the advantage of creating a new OS only with different look but all the rest the same old S hit ? whats the point of that?
    i dont see any reasons for someone complaints bout too much security prompts? its all about double clicking takes mostly bout 10 secs for 10 clicks which is not the cenario here,but just as an example...
    Obviously if u trying to do that in the standard user account u ll have to input username and PW...
    anyways thats my opinion and i can assure that its possible take ownership of a folder then delete it,now im not so sure of that by trying it remotly in a secured enviroument in which u are not a member of administrators group..
    All my best,
    RR
    Saturday, November 28, 2009 9:01 PM
  • also try this kb with the solution provided in it http://support.microsoft.com/kb/320081
    Sunday, November 29, 2009 5:31 AM
  • i'm at a loss here. i cant access any programs. downloaded programs wont open and give the report of something like "a problem occured with (filename)" .....and under "my computer" i cant open the c: drive at all. as mentioned before. i cant take ownership since these buttons deny me access to do that.   Is there any solution?
    Sunday, November 29, 2009 6:17 PM
  • well then in this case(which i would call worst case cenario) ,go to a gun store,grab a shotgun and breath 10 times then pull the trigger!!
    LMFAO im joking dude ,serious thats like something i wouldnt want to go through,im talking about ur situation,weird that u cant even press the buttons???
    anyways w8 for the Experts here advise u and sorry for the useless post but i was just craking up here and felt like posting just for fun,that just came outta off the top of my head but not that im happy with ur disgrace =/
    Kind regards,
    RR
    Sunday, November 29, 2009 11:36 PM
  • NeonStream:

    Your problem is far beyond what was being discussed here. You've got some damage done that really requires a fresh install of windows. Too many things can cause these effects you're experiencing. But, I believe a clean install should hekp you best.  As for the original "permissions" problem we started with, this is a defect in Vista and 7 that M$ refuses to acknowledge or correct.

    They should've made a Windows Ultimate Closed/Home version and a Windows Ultimate Enhanced Security version for Home network users, who don't need all this permissions c rap, and Public network users, who need more security. M$ has bollocksed-up their OS with their paranoia and we're paying for it.

    Ddos_Evader:

    You haven't really helped the situation. You're emails are almost unintelligible, and the gist I get from them is that you don't understand what the discussion is about. What is "777 permissions?" What has it to do with this?
    Monday, November 30, 2009 2:09 AM
  • please run sfc /scannow to check filesystem
    http://support.microsoft.com/kb/929833
    Monday, November 30, 2009 2:38 AM
  • "You haven't really helped the situation. You're emails are almost unintelligible, and the gist I get from them is that you don't understand what the discussion is about. What is "777 permissions?" What has it to do with this"

    Ok then u should read the books,777 permission means FULL CONTROL to all users or same rights for all users,is that clear enuff 4 ya?

    have you read this :

    "there is a security policy in GPO that u set to " elevate without prompting" just do that and u change the uac behaviour ,not somehing that i would advised but if u want to leave it all wide opened and accessible (Like XP)just do it,up to Yous..."

    it aint english at all?

    Note : not somehing that i would advise but if u want to leave it all wide opened and accessible (Like XP)just do it,up to Yous- Personal toughts and irrelevant for those who are not "Paranoia",maybe not awared of todays internet threats...can call me geek.

    "i doubt ppl here also is having problems in deleting folders or files in the sub! that  is the easiest thing ever after u take ownership and attribute all the permissions for users!!! u might as well check if theres any user such as everyone set to deny in special permissions as mentioned above " - isnt this so simple to understand?

    now allowing multiple changes for multiple folders u would have to go for a custom script i've read here in this forum somewhere that i cant point out for u now and sorry for that...

    the only thing that irritates me is ppl crapping the skit outta UAC ,that just sounds Dumb for me 4 reals and it its Dumb indeed, as i see some videos in UT and i laugh my Ends off that ppl is advising to turn off UAC and they feel so KOOL HeHe..
    anyways everyone is free to choose whatever they want,i just cant bear ppl talkin skit bout UAC,if you u dun like ,well just turn it off completely then but dun come with stupid comments which they make absolutely no sense at all and it hurts my ears/eyes so deeply!
    All my best,
    RR
    Monday, November 30, 2009 2:50 AM
  • It's obvious now that you haven't a clue what this discussion is about. It started in May of this year and we've tried ALL the available solutions (including the"777"). UAC is not the problem here. The probem is in a system which automatically refuses to let the owner use their own computer. UAC is fine, as long as WE users have control. Tell me how to delete or move MY files and folders, that I created, without Vista/7 deciding on a whim to allow or deny me access, and then you will have solved the problem. You won't be able to do that because it is in the coding of the OS. These arbitrary denials of service are due to sloppy coding and a philosophy of Father Knows Best at M$.


    Cheers!


    P.S.     And still your juvenile jargon serves no purpose here.  We are trying to do something. No one has ever liked a smart-alecky child. Or to put in terms you might understand:  GrUp. Is that clear enuff 4 ya?
    Monday, November 30, 2009 6:09 AM
  • yeah i know ,maybe u are juvenile and dunno that,i understand all ur text with no sweats buddy,got that dizzle?
    the thing is it never happend to me ,denying without prompting unless i set to deny for the users in admin group...
    its kind of weird that maybe ur misconfiguration is triggering that,how could that possibily happpen only with a few ppl? aint that something particular?
    maybe u half age of me and u calling me child and thats ok i can live with that,ppl with limited mind tend to appeal in that way so they relieve theyr fraustration coz they dun have a plausible argument and i do understand that too!!!
    even with "777" dunno why the quotes but thats ok,u cant delete ur files then u should do a fresh install coz ur system may be currupted,and u may also try CALCS to see if ur problem gets solved !!!

    "We are trying to do something" be specific then cause i ran my eyes through all these posts again back and forth,turned my pc upside down to see if i missed anything and still dunno why u said i didnt understand whats this threads purposes...?¿

    u are trying to delete some windows folder,whats with that? take ownership,change the permissions in the main permissions windows which gives u the option to " include enheritable permissions from this object's parent" and then u also should uncheck this option in order to delete ur folder THATS IT,if that didnt work ur system is not running smoothly which means something is wrong with it thus u should try a new installation!!!!!!!
    is dat clear enuff kid?
    u should Grow up and smart up by showing ur reasons ,simply saying that i dun even no what im talking about without specifications is just an empty statement!!!
    All my best,
    RR
    Monday, November 30, 2009 2:36 PM
  • Ddos_Evader.  I assume you're using Windows 7 as your primary OS - did you install it on a new / low-level formatted HDD or on one previously used?

    If your're not having problems, it could go some way to proving or disproving that comment somewhere above (by Kieseyhow) that says that the root security bug is (at least partly) caused by the state of the drive you installed W7 on.

    zsolmanz

    EDIT:   Personally, I don't think 777 permissions are a good idea at all.  But as the administrator of my PC, I would love to have full control.  And as to your comment here:
    "if that didnt work ur system is not running smoothly which means something is wrong with it thus u should try a new installation!"  I've now re-installed Windows 7 RC (build 7100) 6 times in an attempt to do what I want.  It's no better now than it was.

    Further edit: I think I just solved my problem - I'll reply after some more testing.
    Monday, November 30, 2009 9:53 PM
  • hi zsolmanz,

    "Further edit: I think I just solved my problem - I'll reply after some more testing." - im glad u got ur problem solved and im sure everyone else here will to if spend some effortts with it!!

    " I assume you're using Windows 7 as your primary OS - did you install it on a new / low-level formatted HDD or on one previously used?"

    yes u got that right baby ^^,it is as my primary OS and i installed over one previously used,the version is 7100 yet till expires then i might as well aquire the ultimate version!

    "But as the administrator of my PC, I would love to have full control"- i do understand that too ,everyone would including me ^^ ,however the OS got to have a trick to keep it a bit harder just in case,and hope u understand my point but its not something unresolveble ,u just need to take some extra steps in order to grant total access to certain root files which they are important for the system to keep it healthy,unlike the other normal folders!!

    and i hope ur further edit serves as an example to the others here ,so they understand its not something impossible and just needs extra steps to achieve that and hope u post how u did it as well to make sure no doubts left!
    Kind regards,
    RR
    Monday, November 30, 2009 10:43 PM
  • Well.  I tested further, and I've come up with mixed results.  For some folders, my method (the standard method I assume) works great.  And for some it doesn't.

    All I did was change give the administrators group ownership over a few files (including subcontainers and objects) that "TrustedInstaller" apparently owned, then removed TrustedInstaller from the permissions list and gave the other four groups full control.

    Perfect - I can now delete Chess Titans, should I so wish.

    Not so with Windows -Live SkyDrive, -NT, -Photoviewer or -Sidebar in the Program Files (x86) folder (I haven't tested others), which after performing the above steps stated that I needed permission from "Administrators" to delete them.  This may be because they're in use, but I know for sure that Photoviewer isn't.  (I don't know what NT or Live SkyDrive do.)

    Anyway, I'd still like a method that changes all of them, consistently.  It seems odd to me that there's a discrepancy here, with exactly the same method.

    Of course, this isn't exactly David Brant's problem (the OP).  He states that he's got hundreds of gigs of files, so even if the above method works it would take him a ridiculous amount of time to fix them all to his ownership.
    Tuesday, December 01, 2009 7:51 PM
  • Hi ZsolmanZ have my sincere greetings!!
    and am really glad u found a way to delete the chess titans!!
    and yeah if u have trusted installer as the owner u defenetly will have problems in deleting and 4got to mension that ,sorry my fault,due to a rushed reading/writing sometimes i miss some details im always in several forums so thats why!

    "Anyway, I'd still like a method that changes all of them, consistently.  It seems odd to me that there's a discrepancy here, with exactly the same method.

    Of course, this isn't exactly David Brant's problem (the OP).  He states that he's got hundreds of gigs of files, so even if the above method works it would take him a ridiculous amount of time to fix them all to his ownership."

    i agree but i also may check if he disables the UAC while doing that so in dat way he avoids the prompts,if so then we might have some script Icalcs in order to change multiple files,i personally find it hard to someone haveto  delete multiple files in the root folders,knowing most of them are important unlike the Chess app...
    but i m not one to opose him here doubt bout his ligitimacy...
    so w8 for the experienced boyz to give some further and useful feedback(cross fingers to have some experienced kid willing to help)
    Kind regards,
    RR
    • Proposed as answer by zsolmanz Tuesday, December 01, 2009 10:17 PM
    Tuesday, December 01, 2009 9:01 PM
  • David Brant's problem isn't related to original files in the root folders at all.  His files must've been from outside the system:
    "(400+ gigs) (I'm a digital photographer)"

    Presumably, his files are pics, and as such I doubt that they shipped with Windows.  Strangely enough, in my previous attempts to delete Chess Titans (I don't have a problem with it, it's just a good example and not too important in case I delete it :p), it was always the .jpeg image within that folder that was the troublesome one to delete.
    I noticed when I was mucking about with dual booting that if W7 locks you out of a file, or sets any permissions for it, then even a completely different OS (32bit XP pro in my case) will tell you that access is denied to those files, so obviously W7 extends its influence across the file structure.

    PS. I have UAC completely disabled - I don't know if this helps your diagnosis?  But yes, I agree.  Wait for the big guns to arrive.  It has been 8 months since this thread was started though.

    EDIT:  That was a retarded button-click, I didn't intend to propose your post as an answer.
    Tuesday, December 01, 2009 10:17 PM
  • I have just spent an hour on the phone with microsoft, this was after spending hours on these windows forums, hours googleing issues I am having with win 7. I am dual booting xp and win 7, both on separate drives, and it appears there is no way to have full admin rights to in win 7,like we had in xp. I understand microsoft's concern with the uac, but there should be a way, for experienced users to have full access to all the files and folders on our drives. Although I am very happy with the speed and response of win 7,compared to xp, these permission issues are making me lean to just boot xp and forget win 7. The first few days of using win 7, I was so impressed with it,I was telling all my tech buddies how great it is,and that they should go out and get it. Now I have to tell them all,yea it's great, but microsoft has taken away our admin rights, so I would recommend waiting to see ,if enough people complain, if microsoft allows us to have full access to our own machines. I don't think this can happen,it seems this permission thing is part of the core of the os,and we will have to wait for win 8 to see a fix.

    I had dual booted xp and vista for a month,but was unhappy with vista,so I uninstalled it,so I am new to the uac and it's issues,( although I have it disabled in my win 7 install). One of the issues I am having,(win 7 pro), is I am only able to do a full image backup, if I click on backup now, nothing happens,( at first, when it said setup backup,when I clicked on it nothing would happen, then out of the blue,6 days after installing win 7, I get a popup in the action center stating you haven't setup backup. That 1 time I was able to use the backup.) Now if I click on manage space,change settings, or backup now,nothing happens. The only thing I can think of to try,(wasting more countless hours,is to disconnect all my 4 drives,put 1 new one in ,and install win 7 again, to see if like 1 of the other posters suggested, that having xp involved has some affect on win 7. I think he is right. I first installed win 7 from a download, when microsoft's support suggested I reinstall with the dvd, (an upgrade,not a clean install) I did that yesterday and it changed nothing. I also used windows transfer to move my stuff from xp to win 7. I wonder if this affected the issues I am having. Thus, I think my only recourse is to install again ,on a clean drive,with no other drives installed.

    Another minor issue I am having, is adding coretemp to startup,so I don't have manually start it  everytime I boot. Microsoft's support had me create a admin acct,(with icon on the login screen and all), and I was able to drag coretemp.exe to the startup folder, but not when logged on as myself. I realize this is a minor complaint, but I feel it is again the permissions issue. We need to have full admin rights to our own pc's, not the rights microsoft feels we should have. As one of the other posters said:

    They should've made a Windows Ultimate Closed/Home version and a Windows Ultimate Enhanced Security version for Home network users, who don't need all this permissions c rap, and Public network users, who need more security. M$ has bollocksed-up their OS with their paranoia and we're paying for it. 
    Tuesday, December 01, 2009 11:46 PM
  • M$ just won't give control of the OS to the users. I can't fathom their reasoning. My situation is I use Windows Home Server to store all my media files. My server is in my basement and all my PCs are scattered about the house on a wired/wireless network. When I attempt to manage files from the satellite PCs I get random denials of service with msgs. such as: "You Need Permission" and "File is open in another application" when neither should be true. Even the otherwise great program UNLOCKER usually doesn't work. Sometimes if I click the "Try Again" button many times the Move or Delete operation will work. Most often not. Sometimes trying a different method of Moving or Deleting will work. Most often not. I use Vista and 7 (I find Vista is faster than 7; and my wife's laptop has XP and she never complains!). I have the same problem in both. I've tried to "elevate without prompt" and adding/removing users/groups. I've given ALL users/groups Full Control, but nothing seems to cure the problem. Re-installs don't work. I have files/folders all over that I just can't move or delete. If companies would have continued to support XP for a few more years, I'd've stuck with that.
    Wednesday, December 02, 2009 4:36 AM
  • (Apologies for flagging the previous comment as a potential answer... slip of the fingers...)

    Here's another viewpoint, including something that "worked for me":

    Like a few posters here, I also found that whole logical volumes randomly became "effectively off-limits", with some of the obvious symptoms including:
     *   The absence of the "New" context option when trying to create a new folder. Obviously, I couldn't create much of anything else, either.
     *   Messages to the effect that a volume was write-protected.
     *   Inability to create files into existing directories.

    Some configuration-related info (not trying to show off, just painting a picture):
     *   Multi-boot setup:
          XPhome/32bit/SP3 (my old 'live' system)
       + Win7RC/32bit (a testing system)
       + Win7RC/64bit (another testing system)
       + Win7HomePremium/64bit (installed 2 days ago with the objective of going live) * I'm currently running with UAC turned off, because of various 'issues' *

     *   Multi-HDD setup (not all shown, but all those shown are NTFS):
           'C' - Win7HomePremium boot, brand new Corsair SSD purchased for this install, never used esewhere. Not partitioned.
           'H(ome)' / 'M(usic)' / 'V(ideo)' / 'W(ork)' partitions on new Raid1 matching pair in eSATA enclosure.
           'E' -  Win7RC/64bit boot volume. PATA. Other hidden partitions.
           'F' -  XPhome/32bit/SP3 boot volume. SATA. Other hidden partitions.
           'G' - Win7RC/32bit boot volume. SATA. Other hidden partitions.
           'T' - WD eBook. eSATA enclosure. Not partitioned.
           'X' - A scratch volume. SATA. Not partitioned. 

    *   The symptoms:
    I had been doing the occasional reboot among various systems to check things out.
    During *one* of the boots into XP, I noticed CHKDSK being scheduled: I let it run. I forget which logical volume.

    During a Win7HomePremium session, SOME of my volumes, namely X, H, M & W (but not V) started to show the 'unable to create new directory' problem. I was already running with UAC off (because of a limitation in DriveImageXML).
    I tried following the "take ownership" suggestions: Generally seemed to fail because of "Disk is write-protected"
    I tried following the "attrib" suggestion: Seemed to 'process' for a while, but eventually failed saying that 'system volume information' was read-only (I think)

    * What "worked for me":

    Somewhere in a linked post, there was a reference to running CHKDSK, so I tried it with "Automatically fix file system errors" checked ON and *IT WORKED*
    ...but... there may be some diagnostic info in the WAY that it seems to have worked:
       Normally, the little window for CHKDSK shows some status information like USN bytes processed, *and* it also normally terminates with a "... successfully scanned..." message.
       When run against my 'broken' drives it ended relatively quickly, didn't send any messages, but it certainly fixed my problem... for now...
       Subsequent reruns of CHKDSK against the affected drives run normally, with full status info messages.
       I guess I can't reproduce the problem, and I sure don't want to!

    * Comments:
    It looks to me as if the problem may be symptomatic of some type of corruption at the logical volume level.
    I'm not a Wintel expert but I do have 30+ years in mainframes at fairly deep technical levels, so I'm not totally illiterate either...   ;-)

    I'm absolutely amazed that there seems to be such confusion surrounding an undoubtedly serious problem affecting a major system that has been out in beta for months, on high-visibility public release for weeks, and the SW supplier sems to be s.o.o.o quiet about it all...

    I think I'll try and avoid booting XP again... unless it's to revert because my Win7 'production' system didn't come up to scratch     :-)   :-)

    Good luck to everyone having this problem; I hope my experience helps.

    Later note: This post may als be relevant to:
    http://social.technet.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/w7itprosecurity/thread/a092f176-b2f2-4b98-9e02-15d34d45b224
    and:
    http://social.technet.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/w7itprosecurity/thread/c3366c2f-b6db-4e0b-a000-fd05d271a27f/

    And another update:

    The problem seems to come back whenever it feels like it; the 'fix' only appears to be temporary.

    I'll post more info soon(ish), but in the meantime, here's another related forum:
    http://social.answers.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/w7repair/thread/dbdf9e52-8eb9-4a4f-a10e-2764dc20596d

    Wednesday, December 09, 2009 4:07 AM
  • MY SUGESTION IS TO TAKE OWNERSHIP OF THE ENTIRE DRIVE FIRST, THEN ACCESS THE DRIVE AND CHECK TO SEE IF YOU HAVE OWNERSHIP OF THE DIFFERENT FILES AND FOLDER INSIDE THE DRIVE IT IS ANNOYING, I KNOW.

    SOMETIMES, BY TAKING OWNERSHIP OF THE ENTIRE DRIVE DOES MEAN YOU OWNERSHIP OF ALL THE CONTENT INSIDE THE DRIVE.
    atell02
    Saturday, February 13, 2010 2:25 PM
  • AGAIN, AFTER TAKING OWNE SHIP OF THE FOLDER, CHECK FOR OWNERSHIP OF THE FILES OR INDIVIDUAL CONTENT OF THE FILES
    atell02
    Saturday, February 13, 2010 2:36 PM
  • My post may not be related to the same issue but ...

    Last week I had a similar problem on my client`s machine, who installed Windows 7 without upgrading his EFI (bios).
    He had performed a upgrade installation from a running Vista SP2 system which has ended with an error
    and the setup reverted all changes.
    After next reboot the "C:\Windows" folder became fully corrupted and inaccessible. When attempting to repair the system
    using the "Repair your sytem/computer" option in the Windows boot/startup menu the recovery app. reported a irreparable
    corruption of the "C:\Windows" directory with "Access Denied" suggesting to run Chkdsk.
    After running chkdsk the result was the same. (It was even impossible to delete the folder)

    The solution:
    These are the actions I`ve performed to fix it without loosing any other data on the disk (except the messy "C:\Windows" folder).

    1. Booted into a live-linux distro CD with usefull tools.
        (sfdisk, parted ...) 

    2. Resized (shrinked) the Windows partition by the amount of exact the same size as the corrupted "C:\Windows" dir.
        Repaired the the corrupted MFT Table. Corrected the MBR/boot sectors and rebooted the notebook (back into linux again)
        (due to bad data provided by BIOS ,the S.M.A.R.T. feature of the disk reported a huge bunch of reallocated sectors..)

    3. Voila - non existent / but still present "C:\Windows" directory tree incl. all subfolders and files became accessible ergo "deletable".
       
    Thursday, February 18, 2010 11:02 PM
  • one thing to add to this:

    Right click => Properties => Security => Advanced => Owner => Take Ownership => Click your user name => Then Select the box that says "Replace Owners on subcontainers and objects"

    Don't spam back on how simple it is, just try it first and see if it worked, as it worked for me to take control of anything even "application data" folder
    ("Application data" is completely blocked off on Vista/Win.7)
    Monday, February 22, 2010 2:34 AM
  • That didn't work. I am the owner of these files and I cant access them.
    Monday, February 22, 2010 6:48 PM
  • That didn't work. I am the owner of these files and I cant access them.
    Monday, February 22, 2010 6:48 PM
  • Its a credible rant sterlingwolfe but alas, Windows file security is a nightmare from which nobody awakens.

    Monday, February 22, 2010 6:59 PM
  • Well, I have tried the sharing suggestion, and to no avail.

    I just thought I would post a short update.

    I also have noticed another folder that I cannot delete, called Window.old, which I find strange since I did a fresh installation.  Whatever I try, it will not go away.  I believe this to be related to my previous issue.  I do hope that Microsoft has assigned someone who actually reads these forum posts and makes note or logs them for review.
    Computer software consultant for 27 years

    Not sure if this is still an issue for you. I was able to rid myself of this windows.old folder by doing a disk cleanup and saying yes to deleting previous versions of Windows.
    MVP
    Thursday, March 18, 2010 6:36 PM
  • I have read the many posts on this obnoxious problem with Windows 7.    I found and used a solutlion that was provided on another

    topic, and that was to use a free program called UNLOCKER.     It worked quickly and successfully.  Suggest others try it & post results here!

     

    best, Aaron

    Tuesday, April 06, 2010 9:09 PM
  • I dont care You are a IT freak the only thing I know is what you can read down here!!

    Windows 7 is not a serious OS, Windows 7 have too much errors, and some of this is really dangerous.

    Windows 7 after installing VirtualCloneDrive5, I get a blue screen. Windows automatically reboots to an other restore point.

    But this Restore point was faraway!

    So far that all other accounts are going and consequently lost all data from this accounts!

    I was possible to selecting in the Popup-Window a other restore point, but this was only theory because this other restore point no exists! No important what restore point you select, Windows have only this Point available who is actually running and nothing more!

    And this Problem also happens with drivers from CREATIVE and NVIDIA,

    All drivers who will be installed automatically from windows update!!!

     

    Microsoft Security Essentials is not compatible with Windows 7,

    After Installing mssefull the IE-Browser constantly stops to respond, a lot of Programs needs very very long (Hours)to install (I noted when the Installer copies ".gif") !! All this disappears when mssefull is uninstalled, this behaviour are only with Windows 7, On XP or Vista no problems.

     

    Microsoft Security Essentials, after scanning some external Hard-drive o USB-Drive it needs long time to respond without any notice, so if you remove this Drive from your PC, probably it will be lost and many people

    Have to troy it away! (Drive is RAW).

     

    Windows 7: When Opening the Explorer it shows the whole screen or less but did not remember the last windows position.

    When click in the folder bar it opens a folder, but also all the folders jumps up and down, when deleting a file or folder all jumps up and down but not remember the last position.

    OK I can write here much more, but the truth is Windows-7 Is far away from Windows-XP and finally with all the updates until now Windows-Vista is better than Windows-7.

     

    Any How!

    My Opinion Is How it is possible that Microsoft charge to the consumers so a lot of money for products which are nearly or totally useless!

    What’s happened in the world that the thieves and bandits, mostly from USA are controlling everything!

    What we can do and what must we do for to fight against!
    Tuesday, April 06, 2010 10:13 PM
  • dani_wb post solved it for me!  Thanks, dani_wb.  I did it a little differently, just deleted the Everyone user.  I never noticed that 'special permission".  I wasted a lot of frustrating time before I stumbled on your post.


    "Go to the Properties of the folder that you have problems (maybe also a file or something)
    Check if there is a user called "Everyone" with some Special Rights.

    If yes, there could be the problem...

    Sometimes Windows 7 put following rule:
    Everyone Deny to List Folder/Read Data

    Just delete this Everyone Deny, press three times ok and that's it.
    "

    Wednesday, April 07, 2010 5:10 AM
  • I had a similar problem.  The error message said that I need permission as administrator to copy, move, or delete a file.  I tried to follow many of the suggestions on

    this thread but non worked.

     

    But what DID work with success was suggestion on another thread, and that was to download a free program called UNLOCKER.   I did, it worked, and was very

    uncomplicated to use.  

     

    For the Life of me, I don't know why Msft released Windows 7 with this obnoxious problem.

     

    Best, Aaron

    • Proposed as answer by zsolmanz Wednesday, April 28, 2010 7:49 PM
    Wednesday, April 07, 2010 4:49 PM
  • yes i too used unlocker, i had problems whereby opening itunes (with lots of music stored on an external hard drive) and Traktor Pro wouldnt let me use these files how i wished as i did not have correct user rights.....

     

    unlocker fixed this very simply (lucky me), when i ran it to scan my external HDD (it said there were no probs) it noticed a corrupt recycle bin directory (which must have been created in xp i am supposing) which it deleted and hey presto, seems to be working now, that said i did change many file permissions and recursive ownershi[ (however i already tried this before and it didnt work so i think its unlocker that worked for me).

     

    i have also noticed another problem with the recycle bin on external HDD's; thart is if you merely delete an object on an external drive (not shift_delete) so it is "in the recycle bin of that computer" without clearing recycle bin unplug drive and plug into diff. PC, then you cant delete (the folder/file is not there any more) but as it hasnt been deleted fully disk space is still taken up??

     

    maybe (or maybe just in my case) the recycle bin needs to be fixed for external HDD's??

     

    just my two cents

     

    :P

    Sunday, April 18, 2010 10:20 AM
  • yes i too used unlocker, i had problems whereby opening itunes (with lots of music stored on an external hard drive) and Traktor Pro wouldnt let me use these files how i wished as i did not have correct user rights.....

     

    unlocker fixed this very simply (lucky me), when i ran it to scan my external HDD (it said there were no probs) it noticed a corrupt recycle bin directory (which must have been created in xp i am supposing) which it deleted and hey presto, seems to be working now, that said i did change many file permissions and recursive ownershi[ (however i already tried this before and it didnt work so i think its unlocker that worked for me).

     

    i have also noticed another problem with the recycle bin on external HDD's; thart is if you merely delete an object on an external drive (not shift_delete) so it is "in the recycle bin of that computer" without clearing recycle bin unplug drive and plug into diff. PC, then you cant delete (the folder/file is not there any more) but as it hasnt been deleted fully disk space is still taken up??

     

    maybe (or maybe just in my case) the recycle bin needs to be fixed for external HDD's??

     

    just my two cents

     

     

    • Proposed as answer by David Millsom Sunday, April 25, 2010 8:19 PM
    Sunday, April 18, 2010 10:20 AM
  • So a 3rd party program is the answer to all our problems?  It's great that something works but it's a pity MS couldn't sort out its own problems.

    I personally haven't had any problems since I stopped trying to set up my windows installation exactly how I wanted it - I suppose if I want an OS exactly to my tastes I'll have to learn to write one.

    Thanks for bringing Unlocker to the fore, Aaron.

    Wednesday, April 28, 2010 7:48 PM
  • I don't know how many of you are having problems with the 'take ownership' reg tweak, but on non-english windows editions, there is a known issue.  The 'Administrators' group name is localized (i.e. Administratoren in german), which causes the tweak to half fail (the icacls portion).  What happens is the 'takeown' command reports a success, but the icacls command fails to grant the user full-permissions.   Resulting in situation where the user is the owner of the file, but still cannot access it because they lack the necessary permissions.

    If you are on a non-english system, I would advise you try this version of the Take_Ownership.reg , as it uses the well-known sid to avoid the localized name issue.   More details here

     

    Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00
    
    [HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\*\shell\runas]
    @="Take Ownership"
    "NoWorkingDirectory"=""
    
    [HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\*\shell\runas\command]
    @="cmd.exe /c takeown /f \"%1\" && icacls \"%1\" /grant *S-1-5-32-544:F"
    "IsolatedCommand"="cmd.exe /c takeown /f \"%1\" && icacls \"%1\" /grant *S-1-5-32-544:F"
    
    [HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\Directory\shell\runas]
    @="Take Ownership"
    "NoWorkingDirectory"=""
    
    [HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\Directory\shell\runas\command]
    @="cmd.exe /c takeown /f \"%1\" /r /d y && icacls \"%1\" /grant *S-1-5-32-544:F /t"
    "IsolatedCommand"="cmd.exe /c takeown /f \"%1\" /r /d y && icacls \"%1\" /grant *S-1-5-32-544:F /t" 

     

    • Proposed as answer by Mr Jinje Tuesday, May 18, 2010 5:48 PM
    Tuesday, May 18, 2010 4:24 AM
  • Hello Dani

    I was just going to post a similar problem I had whith several folders in the root of C: and in my user account.

    I've seen that a similar matter was already posted and I have read this your post.

    I have already applied it to one of my folders, removed the everyone from the list, and I didn't even had to press three times OK.

    Now it's working. I have already access. I'm procceding for the other folders with the same problem

    Thanks to you.

    Regards

    Joao

    Tuesday, May 25, 2010 5:01 PM
  • It seams almost as though windows 7 isn't allowing you to use explorer as an admin like you can do with other programs (ie. cmd...) I dropped the UAC permissions down, and rebooted, and it worked. thanks.
    Thursday, June 10, 2010 3:37 AM
  • Dani

     

    Thanks.  That worked for me.

     

    Win 7 team - What a lunatic design to Deny Everyone and override Administrator settings!

     

    Andrew

    Friday, June 18, 2010 6:34 PM
  • Hi, someone out there please help me!

    I have already changed the ownership of the C drive and double check the settings in the C drive properties -> security tab, and it shows my username as the owner. But when I try to edit a simple text file (notepad) and save in the root of C drive, it doesn't allow me to do it. The error indicated "A required privilege is not held by the client."

    This is so frustrating, I am the administrator, then I need to change the ownership. Then after changing the ownership, I can't even save a file in C drive.

    Please help me. MS really sucks when they try to do too much and interfere with user permission.

     

    Please help me. I will be bookmarking this thread and check any answers or solution to this issue... Thks all...

    Thursday, July 01, 2010 10:42 PM
  • just a shot in the dark: are the files looking green in explorer? if they do, it might be that they are encrypted. encrypted files might not be readable if you have upgraded your OS as the encryption is signed by the older OS. to decrypt these files you might need a 3rd party utility to re-sign those files encrypted.
    Tuesday, July 06, 2010 9:54 AM
  • Another shot in the dark... check the file type to be sure it is not a shortcut.  If it is, get the file folder  the shortcut references, copy it, delete the shortcut, and then paste the folder as a replacement for the shortcut.
    Sunday, August 01, 2010 4:32 PM
  • Hello, I had same problem, after spending sometime looking, I found out that the best way to delete them is from DOS .

    Start--programs--Accessories---right click on Command Prompt and choose run as Administrator , then navigate to your folder place, for me, I needed to delete so I used the command "rmdir "foldername" and it worked, I think copy commands will work too, give it a try.

     

    I hope I could help.


    Mark
    Wednesday, August 04, 2010 10:41 AM
  • RIGHT CLICK THE FILES YOU NEED TO SET THE PROPERTIES ON, AND CHOOSE POPERTIES...(PUN)

       ON THE SHARING AND SECURITY TAB, CHOOSE ADVANCED, AND MAKE SURE THAT YOU HAVE FULL CONTROL OVER THE FILE...THIS WON'T WORK IF YOU ARE NOT AN ADMINISTRATIVE -LEVEL USER., OR IF YOUR ACCOUNT IS INCLUDED IN THE PLAIN USERS CATEGORY...

    Sunday, September 12, 2010 8:33 AM
  • ??Im sorry, but you honestly think that we havent tried that??

     

    jeez, sorry if i sound pissed off, but that is truely a bad suggestion, it is already established that the problem lies far far deeper than that.

    Monday, October 18, 2010 12:02 AM
  • I have been locked out of my external hard drive for a couple days now. Can't even access the files. I have tried several attempts at setting ownership, sharing, user access, auditing, etc etc. This is F)#$(*&(*)$&#% STUPID. I OWN THIS COMPUTER.
    • Proposed as answer by Renee Culver Friday, March 09, 2012 3:27 AM
    Sunday, November 14, 2010 1:16 AM
  •      Yes, it's not a good thing that the average user account must be limited, and microsoft has been forced to design the administrator accounts in such a way that they are separated from the machine-levels of priveledges, which is where I believe the whole root of the problem lies. The whole point of taking ownership of the files is that THEN YOU COULD ADD THE NECESSARY PERMISSIONS TO YOUR USER ACCOUNTS AS NECESSARY, AND APPLY THE APPROPRIATE ONES FOR THE SYSTEM AS WELL, USING THE SAME METHODS ! nOTE THAT THIS WON'T WORK IF YOU ARE IN A CLIENT-SIDE TERMINAL TRYING TO ACCESS FILES OFF A SERVER !!! tHIS WOULD ONLY WORK IF YOU ARE LOGGED IN AT THE SERVER WHERE THE FILES ARE PHYSICALLY STORED ON DISK ! CLIENTS AND REMOTE CONNECTIONS ARE ALMOST ALWAYS AT THE DEFAULT "GUEST" LEVEL...

    HAS ANY OF YOU TRIED THE NEW microsoft support portal?  It's fully automated for fixing windows troubles, and it is free.  I'll give you the link address for the main page, which has a listing of windows problems by topic, files and folder permissions are one of them under the "windows" main header.

    "HTTP://support.microsoft.com/fixit/default.aspx '.

    perhaps it can help you.


    "While there is NO SUCH THING as a WRONG QUESTION, the EASIEST THING TO GET in the world is a WRONG ANSWER!"
    Sunday, November 14, 2010 1:59 AM
  • THE WINDOWS.OLD FILE IS THE PREVIOUS WINDOWS INSTALLATION THAT WAS OVERWRITTEN WHEN YOU RE-INSTALLED VISTA.  (or "7" )  YOU CAN STILL ACCESS YOUR PERSONAL FILES IN IT BY EXPLORING IT, it will look just like the c:\ drive's first windows directory. Your old desktop and personal files are under the c:\windows.old\users\your account name here\desktop, documents, etcetera etcetera....You can also access the program files and other things, they are now in the c:\windows.old\program files folder, get it ?   SEE, VISTA, AND NOW "7"  INSTALLS USING AN "IMAGE", rather than the older sector by sector setup built from the root upwards.  If you were to reinstall yet again, your windows right now would become c:\windows.001, successive installs would create more compressed images, the only difference being that your hard drive space would shrink very quickly and that the .### 's would continue upwards in increments of one.

    "While there is NO SUCH THING as a WRONG QUESTION, the EASIEST THING TO GET in the world is a WRONG ANSWER!" 15 years of hands-on-how-to; I "DO" WINDOWS !!!
    Sunday, November 14, 2010 2:27 AM
  • Sharing permissions only apply to directories shared over the network. Local access ignores sharing permissions: if the drive is on the local machine, you are only interested in AD permissions.

    Go to the root drive and go to advanced, CAREFULLY set permissions there, and put the check mark in the "replace permissions on all child objects..." and apply. This will take some time...

    Yes this will hose permissions for backups, databases and other software that creates special rights and user accounts for functionality (i.e. quickbooks, SQL, BackupExec, etc.

    Sunday, January 09, 2011 4:29 AM
  • I have the problem on an external USB drive partitioned in XP Pro. Since clean installing Win 7, I am unable to alter or save to this partition. I have tried everything mentioned here but still to no avail.

    These files are not shared but I have read-only access.

    Wednesday, February 02, 2011 3:28 AM
  • I have the problem on an external USB drive partitioned in XP Pro. Since clean installing Win 7, I am unable to alter or save to this partition. I have tried everything mentioned here but still to no avail.

    These files are not shared but I have read-only access.

    if you want change your access, you have to logon bye administrator, with administrator you have full access.... if you want to change user accesses you have to log in with administrator and right click on the file then go to => properties\security\advanced\change permissions\add\advanced\find now\ then select user that you want to give permissions to him. push Ok for all pages. go to properties again, and go to security then click on edit and now you can change your access permission, ( read or write or full access) now that user has permission to do what he want.
    • Proposed as answer by aminsalehi Wednesday, February 16, 2011 7:21 PM
    Wednesday, February 16, 2011 7:21 PM
  • I just had the same issue of not being able to take ownership of a directory with hundreds of subfolders and files. No matter what combination of permissions or ownership I tried, nothing would work. I did fix my issue, and I would like to post the solution. This solution is barely mentioned in this thread (I believe it is included in the post with the registry key to add Take Ownership to context menu). Do the following:

    Run an elevated command prompt (Start --> type command in the search box --> Right click command prompt and Run as Administrator (or control+shift+enter)

    Navigate to the partition containing the folder in question (C:, D:, E:, etc). If the folder in question is on the C: drive, type CD\ to get to the root (assuming C is your OS drive).

    Type the following command:

    TAKEOWN /F *directory name or path*

    Example: 

    C:\Windows\system32>D:
    
    D:\>TAKEOWN /F Music
    
    SUCCESS: The file (or folder): "D:\Music" now owned by user "Coltwanger-PC\Coltwanger".
    

    Or if you had a path outside of the root of that drive, you would type TAKEOWN /F Music\Blues\Artists... etc.

    Next, use the following command:

    ICACLS *Directory name or path* /grant %USERNAME%:F /T

    Insert your directory (in this case, Music) and remove the asterisks. You can leave the %USERNAME%, since it is just an environment variable for your current login. Change this if you need to assign permissions to a different user. Note that "F" is for Full Control, and /T is to traverse subfolders and files.

    Example:

    D:\>ICACLS Music /grant %USERNAME%:F /T
    ...
    processed file: music\Zune\Podcasts\Windows Weekly\Folder.jpg
    processed file: music\Zune\Podcasts\Windows Weekly\Windows Weekly 102 Now With U
    nicorn Tears.mp3
    Successfully processed 18809 files; Failed processing 0 files
    

    The screen will scroll through all of the subfolders and files within that directory until it's finished.

    Hope this helps someone else; I couldn't get it to work through the Security interface!

    • Proposed as answer by baldmosher Wednesday, December 28, 2011 5:55 PM
    Friday, March 25, 2011 2:37 AM
  • I've been fighting the Security User in Windows 7 for 3 weeks now and NO ONE seems to have a workable answer to how one gains the ability to sinply change out a program file.  In my searching for an answer, I ran across a story where the manager of the UAC development group at MS said "We did that intentionally to ANNOY the user!  To force them to change their behavior."  Wasn't that sweet of them?

    Since there is NO answer to this problem, I'm about to see just how far my OEM Win7 Premium DVD will fly (I'm on top of a mile high mountain).  I see no reason to keep butting my head against the company, no more than I figure I'll ever spend one more dollar on anything Microsoft.  They want to mess with me.  I stop paying them.  Small annoyance, I'm sure, but with as many people's computers that I work on, "word of mouth advertising" is better than money can buy and I'll definitely inform my clients as to what NOT to purchase.  I've already had 8 clients have me install Win 7 and return to have it pulled and replaced with XP.

    Microsoft shot themselves in the foot with this on.  I understand Windows 8 may be out by the end of the year (2011).  If they continue this absurdity, many will bypass that purchase also, myself included.

    So, tell me I'm wrong.  Or, walk me, step by step, through the "jungle" of gaining control.  I've done everything I've read about online, to no avail.  Windows may be the new "gem" but it's just a POS to me, so far.  However, I know what DOESN'T work and am looking ONE LAST TIME to see if anyone knows what DOES work.  Tell me how to simply overwrite a file successfully.  No more, no less.  So far, no one's come up with the answer.  YOU????

    Monday, May 09, 2011 8:17 PM
  • Your a Genius Mr ColtWanger!
    Wednesday, June 01, 2011 9:37 PM
  • HELLO ALL. I THINK I HAVE A SOLUTION. I HAD THIS PROBLEM FOR A WHOLE 4 HOURS AND SOMEONE SUGGESTED THAT I DISABLE ANTIVIRUS TEMPORARILY. SOMEHOW THAT WORKED AND I IMMEDIATELY HAD "EVERYONE" 'S PERMISSION AND WAS ABLE TO MODIFY THE FILE ( I ASSUME THAT THE ANTIVIRUS HAS SOME USER CONTROL PRIVILEGES ITSELF). I AM NOT SURE IF THAT WOULD WORK FOR YOU CONSIDERING THAT THE OBJECT IN QUESTION WAS A CRACK WITH A FALSE POSITIVE BUT I GUESS IT'S WORTH A TRY. I AM RUNNING AN OLDER PC WITH WINDOWS 7 64 BIT UPGRADED AND THE CAPS LOCK BUTTON IS FROZEN ON SO SORRY IF IT LOOKS LIKE I AM SHOUTING.
    Monday, August 22, 2011 5:36 PM
  • I have switched from Xp to W7; loaded W7 onto a new 1TB disk and used the old disk for storage, it was partitioned int 3 sections and I could access the second and third partitions but not the first.

    After trawling through all the forums I eventually removed permissions from 'Everyone' and 'System' left wyself on and hey presto all working!

    Monday, August 29, 2011 1:45 PM
  • I have just stumbled on to this thread after months of anguish, frustration, lost time and incredible expense to the tune of about $2000 in new hard drives (more if you include my old hard drives that didn't survive the multiple wipes)!  I am excited to see things to try that I haven't tried yet (including driving to the top of a mountain with all my MS software and testing its flight capabilities . . LOL) and will start on that promptly.  I would like to know if anyone has come across any new information on this.  I see that the last post was in August with still no direct solution.  Any info would be greatly appreciated.
    Donna Wise
    Friday, September 23, 2011 4:06 PM
  • In addition to what Mr. ColtWanger said,

    in my case after taking ownership of the folder I still couldn't push permissions down to the files in the folder since I didn't haver permission or ownership of those files.

    To get ownership of all those files I just added a \*.* to the TAKEOWN command

    TAKEOWN /F <some drive>\< some path>\< some folder>\*.*

    ex. C:\> TAKEOWN /F "E:\Users\user1\AppData\Temp\*.*"

    Once I had ownership of all the files in the directory I could run the ICACLS command just fine

    ICACLS <some drive>\< some path>\< some folder> /grant %USERNAME%:F /T

    ex. C:\> ICACLS E:\Users\user1\AppData\Temp /grant %USERNAME%:f /T

     

    Tuesday, October 18, 2011 11:57 PM
  • I just don’t know if the question is still the same who generated this topic. There’s a long time that I don’t come to this topic.

    But, if it is, my intention is to live here what I have learned about this question

    In NTFS there is an attribute called  $FILE_NAME that configures in one of its fields if the file is or is not a reparse point.

    When system finds a file which is defined as a reparse point, he searches for the adequate filter defined in that field and executes what is indicated by that filter.

    For instance, a shortcut for a file, which is a file (everything in NTFS are files) is defined as a reparse point and executes a filter which sends the system to the real file.

    The same way, because Windows 7 changed the names of the locations of several kind of files, to keep compatibility with older systems and programs that referred to those files in the older positions, Microsoft created the ancient files (a folder is a file- Index file – for NTFS) as reparse points which redirect to the newest locations of those files.

    So, those folders you are trying to access are reparse points. They don´t have anything with them. They just redirect the system to the appropriated local.

    Friday, December 09, 2011 6:37 PM
  • I just had the same issue of not being able to take ownership of a directory with hundreds of subfolders and files. No matter what combination of permissions or ownership I tried, nothing would work. I did fix my issue, and I would like to post the solution. This solution is barely mentioned in this thread (I believe it is included in the post with the registry key to add Take Ownership to context menu). Do the following:

    Run an elevated command prompt (Start --> type command in the search box --> Right click command prompt and Run as Administrator (or control+shift+enter)

    Navigate to the partition containing the folder in question (C:, D:, E:, etc). If the folder in question is on the C: drive, type CD\ to get to the root (assuming C is your OS drive).

    Type the following command:

    TAKEOWN /F *directory name or path*

    Example: 

    C:\Windows\system32>D:
    
    D:\>TAKEOWN /F Music
    
    SUCCESS: The file (or folder): "D:\Music" now owned by user "Coltwanger-PC\Coltwanger".
    

    Or if you had a path outside of the root of that drive, you would type TAKEOWN /F Music\Blues\Artists... etc.

    Next, use the following command:

    ICACLS *Directory name or path* /grant %USERNAME%:F /T

    Insert your directory (in this case, Music) and remove the asterisks. You can leave the %USERNAME%, since it is just an environment variable for your current login. Change this if you need to assign permissions to a different user. Note that "F" is for Full Control, and /T is to traverse subfolders and files.

    Example:

    D:\>ICACLS Music /grant %USERNAME%:F /T
    ...
    processed file: music\Zune\Podcasts\Windows Weekly\Folder.jpg
    processed file: music\Zune\Podcasts\Windows Weekly\Windows Weekly 102 Now With U
    nicorn Tears.mp3
    Successfully processed 18809 files; Failed processing 0 files
    

    The screen will scroll through all of the subfolders and files within that directory until it's finished.

    Hope this helps someone else; I couldn't get it to work through the Security interface!

    I've amended this slightly for my needs... similar to others I have thousands of files across hundreds of folders that Win7 simply won't allow me to access since I moved the drive from another machine. I have SP1 installed and although I haven't wasted any more time messing with permissions and audit rights I'm still getting the same issues with being denied access when I try to open the files. So I followed Coltwanger's advice above and amended slightly for my needs:

    CMD (Command Prompt) as Administrator

    cd to the relevant drive root (in my case D:\)

    TAKEOWN /F *.* /A /R /D Y
    /F processes all files
    /R recurs for all subfolders and files
    /A takes permission for the Administrators group (I could easily have specified my own username but shouldn't be necessary as I'm running CMD as Administrator anyway and so it might have failed in the next step)
    /D Y suppresses the confirmation prompt

    Then when running ICACLS I amended with /grant:R to replace all existing permissions. Not necessary as I'm using the :F switch after my name. Using Everyone:F will make the whole structure wide open to anyone on the network. Fine if you trust your firewall ;-)

    ICACLS D:\* /grant:R baldmosher:F /T

    Successfully processed 31380 files, 0 failures. YAAAAAY!!!!

    • Edited by baldmosher Saturday, December 31, 2011 3:50 PM
    Wednesday, December 28, 2011 6:15 PM
  • I radically disagree. I am a systems developer for VMS. We had good security but also privelages to bypasses file security. I NEVER ran without it. Windows file security is awful bacause theirs no way to turn it off even with the UAC off.

    Renee


    "MODERN PROGRAMMING is deficient in elementary ways BECAUSE of problems INTRODUCED by MODERN PROGRAMMING." Me

    Sunday, February 19, 2012 8:36 AM
  • For one, lets agree that (especially males and I'm a male) are jealous of people more successful than us.  Bill Gates for example. 

    Lets agree many of these people refuse to use Windows and use Linux for that very reason - jealousy.

    Lets agree that people constantly complain that Windows is so LESS secure than Linux.  These same people troll these forums complaining under one name that Windows is so insecure, and then under another name that Windows security is too tight.  Duhhhhhh.

    This tread is all over the place, with so much wrong information, I pity the original poster.

    Linux users are told "don't run as "Root".  They don't.  Increases security.  So MS follows suit, because it is a good idea.  Boom, everyone is confused and lost.  Is it that Linux users are that much smarter than Windows users?

    Here are the issues as I see them:

    1) How many people think that if they are logged on as a user who is a member of the Administrators group that the program they are using (e.g. Explorer or the Command Prompt) is running with Administrator privilleges?  By default programs start w/o admin even if you are a member of the admin group; you must explicitly start the program as admin, otherwise that program (file manager, explorer, cmd) runs as YOU (i.e. your userid), and not admin; this is good; police only use a gun when necessary - same concept

    2) File/folder ownership - ownership ONLY conveys that the owner can change the security access; it does NOT itself GIVE YOU ANY ACCESS to the file/folder (like reading or writing or deleting)

    3) Once taking control, you can then change security

    4) These actions can be performed either in the Security tab GUI, or using the TAKEOWN and ICACLS commands "DOS" commands

    5) Please mis-poster - if you want to use DOS commands, please do so and post it in the MS-DOS forum (sorry I don't have the URL); DOS and DOS prompts haven't existed since I reached puberty; the Command Prompt is NOT DOS; it is a full 64 bit prompt asking you want do you want to do (many of these people are actually Linux people out trolling trying to convince people that Windows is really a DOS GUI built on top of DOS (ha ha); you know, Linux has a DOS prompt as well, using your definition - how about that - Linux is really a DOS and a  GUI!!!!!

    6) I believe that everyone could be happy if MS came out with windows No Security for those that want to be Alpha Males - you know, I CAN DO EVERYTHING CUZ I'm BIG AND TOUGH; please don't post if your using such a system and someone else, including hackers delete or modify your files; that and a Secure Windows for the rest of us who want Windows with security.

    7) MS should come out with the equivalent of NTFS and Windows Security for Dummies blurb - basic easy to understand info for the non IT professional, that makes it easy to understand and with examples of what to do, because the info I've read on this post is more wrong than right.  Pity the poor person that tries this then tries that.  Lucky medical doctors don't work like "us" professionals do, huh?  Because I agree, for the home user, most of this security stuff - may as well be written in Sanskript.

    8) No I don't believe that an Admin user should have access to everyone's data.  In a business world (to us professionals, we know, but others posting here might not realize): if you as an Admin can view my password ("hi, I forgot my password, can you tell me what it is?") - is completely stupid; when you sign up at a company, you sign a document saying that you MUST NOT share your password WITH ANYONE ELSE.  If admins know my password, this is sharing my password.  In court, if it is found that my USERID did something bad, I can simply say "not me, one of the admins logged on with my userid since they know my password your honor, and I had no say because I didn't give them my password  - they just gave themselves access to my password" - end of trial.  If you want to see someone else's data, GET THEIR PERMISSION; they can provide YOU access if they want to.  Sharing data requires BOTH to say yes.  As they being regular users can't modify common shared data (e.g. compromise system files etc) - they can't affect you.  Admin access where I can do anything I want - these are the same people that would say "NEVER" if you wanted full access to their data  ("do as I say, not as I do").  I can't see your data? You can't see mine.  End of story.  And for parents who are curious about their children's data collection?  Your children's USER folder can be modified so you can see it and they can be prevented from storing files elsewhere.  Tell them "your data is viewable by us - forewarned" (until they encrypt it).

    The problem with Free Support is often, you get what you pay for.

    Friday, March 09, 2012 1:32 AM
  • Hold on....

    For me, MS does horribly with security. I was a developement engineer for Digtal Equipment Corp and we had (when I was there) about twenty eight different privilges NOT ONE. We have to remember that Windows and VMS had different missions and audiences. Digital had 64 bit systems about 20 years before MS did. VMS was intended for the serious user or devolper whereas Windows is designed for People who are about as intelligent as bricks which is why windows is so security conscoius.

    Renee


    "MODERN PROGRAMMING is deficient in elementary ways BECAUSE of problems INTRODUCED by MODERN PROGRAMMING." Me


    Friday, March 09, 2012 3:24 AM
  • Fish Monger is right!

    Renee


    "MODERN PROGRAMMING is deficient in elementary ways BECAUSE of problems INTRODUCED by MODERN PROGRAMMING." Me

    Friday, March 09, 2012 3:25 AM
  • "they are separated from the machine-levels of priveledges,"

    I started to say that privilges are an operating system phenominon but that's not true. There is K,E,S and U. I dont think S is well developed in the Windows world. Bur K and U definately are.

    Renee


    "MODERN PROGRAMMING is deficient in elementary ways BECAUSE of problems INTRODUCED by MODERN PROGRAMMING." Me

    Friday, March 09, 2012 3:34 AM
  • OK..... Since this seems to be missing.

    IF ALL ELSE FAILS:

    boot into a linux livecd and copy/rename the file

    At the least it will do this, no questions asked.

    It MIGHT let you/automatically reset the permissions on the file. No questions asked.

    Sunday, July 01, 2012 3:04 AM
  • yes, i am currently experiencing somewhat of the same dilemma as I have upgraded to windows7 professional.  Thus, i was boggled by the repeated and countless times i opened up my back up files and could not restore them.  I came to a solution which is in general If.. you saved your files on back up to a different drive and system protection was ON then you CAN restore its files to its original settings.  In fact, the files never left your local partition just hidden from u for the safety of the dual processors and system crash or failure.  so, if you or anyone is asking how do i? well, it's simple, just right click on the back up location and restore to its original version.... cheers

    • Proposed as answer by Malaymammi Wednesday, October 31, 2012 7:22 AM
    Wednesday, October 31, 2012 7:22 AM
  • My issue is similar (related to permissions) but am unable to take ownership and Win7 has stopped booting:

    I recently came accross this and it appears it has invalidated the permissions on the Win7 disk.  I can no longer directly access the drive in Win8 - permissions denied.  I also can not boot to Win7 - it gets to where it should show the logon screen and gives me black screen on both monitors and a mouse cursor but that is it.

    I first attempted to repair the startup but as far as Windows knows it "booted sucessfully" for the same reason the last good configuration is also no good.  I then attempted a restore and it can't read the disk - but booting into normal repair mode (Win7) I can navigate the disk and was even able to browse the files on the drive.  I attempted to use ICACLS from Win7 recovery, granting (no :r) Administrators group as the owner.  It goes through all the files, says successful but it's unable to write the log at the end.

    I then booted to Win8 and attempted properties => security on the whole (G drive) - I am also unable to grant the Win8 administrator access to the drive, it shows the shield and I approve but it is unable to enumerate the files within in order to adjust permissions for each file / subfolder within.  I also attempted an ICACLS from Win8 with seemingly positive results - it completes and says successful but it does not change anything. The drive and subdirectories are listed as read only, I also receive the enumerating error when attempting to clear the read only box int he properties for the entire drive.  I have also attempted this with subdirectories only.

    I can not browse g:\ but I can go right to g:\subfolder - I can see the files, but I do not have permission.

    To reproduce this issue:
    -   existing 128g SSD for Win7 system, data folders moved to separate data drive (my documents, etc)
    -   new 128g SSD for Win8
    - changed boot order to Optical Win8 Win7
    - installed Win8 from DVD
    - after initial configuration rebooted and pressed F8 for BIOS boot menu - selected Win7 drive
    - Win7 booted successfully
    - rebooted to Win8, installed an application which already existed on the Win7 drive - installed to G(Win7)\program files (x86)\application overwriting the (same version, same install) application installed on Win7 to align the Win8 registry with the program files
    - application referenced G(Win7)\subfolder\data files
    - shutdown
    - started Win8, used application successfully
    - booted to Win7 (same method as above), used application successfully
    - booted to Win8, performed hibernate
    - turn on computer, Win8 resumed
    - could no longer get to G(Win7) drive due to permission errors
    - restarted Win8 - same results
    - attempted to start Win7 - received blank screen w/ mouse
    - attempted to startup repair via Win7 F8 menu - nothing to fix (appears OS booted successfully)
    - attempted permissions refresh with ICACLS
    - attempted booting to safe mode - bluescreen
    - attempted restore - no Win7 system disk found
    - Win8 still boots, still unable to get to G(Win7) drive from Win8 due to permissions errors - any low level tools with administrator permissions get an access denied when attempting to access the drive, open files, or make any modifications to permissions or properties

    How can the filesystem be recovered if Win7 will not boot and Win8 is denied access?  (Bitlocker is NOT enabled on either drive)

    Joshua Wilcox

    Friday, November 02, 2012 5:05 PM
  • Try the command prompt and access the root diretory (c:); in my case, I couldn't open the diretory of the example.

    1) c:\Windows\system32>cd ..

    2)c:\Windows>cd ..

    3)c:\>dir

    It will show all the directories, like Program Files, Program Files (x86) and so on. Access the directory you want.

    4) c:\> cd Program Files (x86)

    5) c:\Program Files (x86)>dir

    Again you'll see the directories under it. Access successively the directories  you want with -cd- untill you see the one you want. To delete it,  just type - rmdir "Directory" /s - and follow the options. You can also  access that directory and delete the files one-by-one, if you know which ones, or after the command dir. When finished, just close the window.

    • Proposed as answer by koitijunior Tuesday, November 27, 2012 11:19 PM
    Tuesday, November 27, 2012 11:17 PM
  • I have a probelem.  I have windows 7 xp and I lost things like print shop templates from from old hard drive but in my documents the red labels template is still there but I'm a visual learner and I've done everything it says to restore them but still no help.  Please can someone out there help me.  Is there any hope!   thanks
    • Proposed as answer by Katsrodeo Sunday, February 03, 2013 7:32 AM
    Friday, February 01, 2013 12:03 AM
  • okay guys, I have fought with this issue over 100's of hours and tried every available possible remedy that could, may or might work.  yup, they call it obsessive and way too analytical.  This is a better fix for those of us not real good at command prompts, the hyper-v, powershell etc.

    NOW, this is a fix, BUT, it may be because of the software installed on my computer..... you see, admins, generally, of businesses, ARN"T ACTUALLY AT THE TERMINAL.,  They log in from their domain (URL/domain/company cloud/exchange/enterprise/site, etc.)  So lets see if you all can do this without much fuss or muss, IF THIS DOES NOT WORK FOR YOU, EMAIL ME, BY THEN I WILL KNOW MORE CONCERNING SOFTWARE THAT DETERMINES IF YOU ARE ACTUALLY AN ADMIN  BY AUTHORITY OR AN ADMIN BY NAME, THERE IS A DIFFERENCE.

    okay, first be complete, do your permissions, anybody that needs more intensive abc's let me know on this part, I'm assuming most of you have gotten as far as getting rid of system, creative owner, etc.  So, permissions:

    disable inheritance

    remove all you don't want on there, (sometimes 'system' has to have rights or the software cannot be launched by the 'system', so you will be screwed).

    hit apply, then hit enable inheritance

    back out totally of property box, then reopen

    now, everyone and anyone that the computer could possibly identify you as ADD in the auditing / permissions/ and sharing/ areas of the property boxes and give each full control, this is time consuming, so do the whole drive or all docs or whatever. 

    S-1-5-21-2309458656-1074451275-2062301383-1001   1003,  500

    THIS GUY IS A MAJOR PROBLEM!  AND he's not listed under the advanced/find now section.

    so this is the loophole:  (just love loopholes)  WHEN YOU DENY ANYONE ACCESS, IT TAKES PRECEDENCE OVER ANY ALLOWED ACCESS.

    It seems this guy 'SID', is actually a hidden encrypted name on that list of names for you to add.  So I take 'access control assistance operators', 'authenticated users", and 'winrmremotewmiusers_" and DENY ALL OF THEM ACCESS, just go to 'Permission Entry Program Files' within this property boxes tabs.  they will be on there, in your permissions and other tabs within the property box,  but denied, and deny takes precedence over 'allow'.  Make sure you have already done Permissions, Auditing, Sharing, and applied and enabled your inheritances, and change ownership 'generally to a group', one I changed to me and that worked, but sometimes a 'group', as in 'Users" or 'administrators, should have ownership.  don't forget to do 'applies' as you go, and back out of the boxes and reopen. And you should have an extra 'user account', one for regular, one for admin, not just you for the logon, the computer differentiates between one user, and a user and an admin, just always sign on as admin.

    so far, this, although immensely time consuming and aggravating, is the only way on some of these things that I have been able to have full and total access to certain files. 

    try this, my email is mustangkatm, on gmaildotcom and I will either answer you when I can, or jump back on the board.  If I don't answer you then re EMAIL, I stay busy, have 50 domains, emails, websites etc to keep up with and get behind easily, PUT IN SUBJECT: HELP WITH WINDOWS PERMISSIONS ON TECH NET.  Hope this helps some of you with this problem.  I will keep working on it as I go,  kathy

    dog-book.com

    pettransporters.com

    hallmarkfonts.com

    multiscalegraphicsdevelopment.com

    Vote As Helpful

    I just had the same issue of not being able to take ownership of a directory with hundreds of subfolders and files. No matter what combination of permissions or ownership I tried, nothing would work. I did fix my issue, and I would like to post the solution. This solution is barely mentioned in this thread (I believe it is included in the post with the registry key to add Take Ownership to context menu). Do the following:

    Run an elevated command prompt (Start --> type command in the search box --> Right click command prompt and Run as Administrator (or control+shift+enter)

    Navigate to the partition containing the folder in question (C:, D:, E:, etc). If the folder in question is on the C: drive, type CD\ to get to the root (assuming C is your OS drive).

    Type the following command:

    TAKEOWN /F *directory name or path*

    Example: 

    C:\Windows\system32>D:
    
    D:\>TAKEOWN /F Music
    
    SUCCESS: The file (or folder): "D:\Music" now owned by user "Coltwanger-PC\Coltwanger".
    

    Or if you had a path outside of the root of that drive, you would type TAKEOWN /F Music\Blues\Artists... etc.

    Next, use the following command:

    ICACLS *Directory name or path* /grant %USERNAME%:F /T

    Insert your directory (in this case, Music) and remove the asterisks. You can leave the %USERNAME%, since it is just an environment variable for your current login. Change this if you need to assign permissions to a different user. Note that "F" is for Full Control, and /T is to traverse subfolders and files.

    Example:

    D:\>ICACLS Music /grant %USERNAME%:F /T
    ...
    processed file: music\Zune\Podcasts\Windows Weekly\Folder.jpg
    processed file: music\Zune\Podcasts\Windows Weekly\Windows Weekly 102 Now With U
    nicorn Tears.mp3
    Successfully processed 18809 files; Failed processing 0 files
    

    The screen will scroll through all of the subfolders and files within that directory until it's finished.

    Hope this helps someone else; I couldn't get it to work through the Security interface!

    I've amended this slightly for my needs... similar to others I have thousands of files across hundreds of folders that Win7 simply won't allow me to access since I moved the drive from another machine. I have SP1 installed and although I haven't wasted any more time messing with permissions and audit rights I'm still getting the same issues with being denied access when I try to open the files. So I followed Coltwanger's advice above and amended slightly for my needs:

    CMD (Command Prompt) as Administrator

    cd to the relevant drive root (in my case D:\)

    TAKEOWN /F *.* /A /R /D Y
    /F processes all files
    /R recurs for all subfolders and files
    /A takes permission for the Administrators group (I could easily have specified my own username but shouldn't be necessary as I'm running CMD as Administrator anyway and so it might have failed in the next step)
    /D Y suppresses the confirmation prompt

    Then when running ICACLS I amended with /grant:R to replace all existing permissions. Not necessary as I'm using the :F switch after my name. Using Everyone:F will make the whole structure wide open to anyone on the network. Fine if you trust your firewall ;-)

    ICACLS D:\* /grant:R baldmosher:F /T

    Successfully processed 31380 files, 0 failures. YAAAAAY!!!!

    Sunday, February 03, 2013 8:14 AM
  • I am experiencing difficulty getting at my files.

    I have used the "Take Ownership" registry hacks (which open a command window) on files and/or folders, and I get a "SUCCESS" message each time; however, I still cannot access the files.

    I can copy the files, and the proper permissions get set on the copies ... but I have several hundred gigs of files and not enough disk space left to do that, to say nothing of having to rename the files.  Strange thing is, after I copy a file, I can delete the original file ... but still not "execute" it (double-click; the app that owns that type of file opens, but reports that it can't get access to the file).

    I set UAC to "off" (lowest setting) and am trying the "Take Ownership" thing again to see if that makes a difference; in the meantime, has anyone else experienced this problem?

    Yes, I have it right now. I didn't do this to my computer though, and I wouldn't have known how to if I wanted to experiment. I simply don't know much at that level about computing. But let me take up company, since I have the same issues, but for different reasons, and with a little more variety thrown in.

    I had a break-in recently where I lost most of my belongings. My computer, for some reason, remained. I was in distress having an open smashed door and being unable to get contact to the police. All I could do was stay quiet, and so I left my computer running for company and light.

    The following night one of the burglars came back to see if there was some hidden goodies in my house, There was nothing I could do, so I stayed at my computer. When he came into the room where I was sitting and sat staring without saying anything I felt it was time to leave, an I Left without closing down my computer.

    When I returned I found I couldn't access any web page on the web, Every time I tried to access a website a pop-up with a warning that the certificate wasn't in order came up, with the appropriate boxes asking if I wanted to continue or leave, only, they both did the same thing: They took me back to where I had been. 

    I didn't give up but kept trying to access something, and finally I found a website with false virus information report program. I stayed there for a while, trying to communicate with them, but it was no use.

    Another change he had made was making it seem as if I had no audio of any kind, so I was in silence and could apparently do nothing about it. - I looked through the files going via Start and Control Panel to Sound and Audio hardware Installations. To my surprise there weren't any! It said there were no audio hooked up with the computer, while I was looking at the wires and ear phones and speakers and the plugs, all of it being the way it had been for a long time. I knew he had removed the files/documents, but I didn't know how he did it or how to find them.

    I Made of course a number of searches, but to no avail. Nothing was found.

    Finally I decided to make a system repair and resetting, and went to find the according folder. But he'd anticipated  this too and removed System Restore as well! This I hadn't expected to be possible, but it's been done and is probably even very easy to do.

    I can't get into most of my files, and several of my more personal files have been either masked as having no content or have been deleted.

    I certainly hope somebody knows how to deal with this, since the parenting, and inheritng, Auditiing and so on are unavailable to me so I can't even do what I did before: Research and learn as I went along.

    .....

    Good luck Brant, and thanks in advance for possible advice.


    Tuesday, April 16, 2013 11:56 PM