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Windows 7 Ultimate Installed memory (RAM) 4 GB (3.25 GB usable) what does this mean?

    Question

  • Windows 7 Ultimate Installed memory (RAM) 4 GB (3.25 GB usable) what does this mean?
    Monday, September 21, 2009 12:29 AM

Answers

  • Hi,

     

    On any 32-bit Operating System (not only Windows), we only have access to 4GB (232) of physical address space by default. 
     

    The issue is the way in which the hardware allocates memory for its own resources. The hardware needs to allocate memory space to use for things like the PCI bus, BIOS, the video card and others. Thus 4GB memory will not be fully displayed if a part of physical address space is used by other things. Generally it will display 2.75GB to 3.5GB.

     

    We can also refer to the following article. Here is the detailed explanation of the issue:

       

    http://blogs.technet.com/markrussinovich/archive/2008/07/21/3092070.aspx

    Monday, September 21, 2009 8:34 AM

All replies

  • Where or how you got to know that 3.25GB is usable? Btw what is the make and model of the ram, are you running similar piece of ram?
    Monday, September 21, 2009 12:35 AM
  • The 4 GB RAM is Factory RAM. I got this in the control panel under system.
    Monday, September 21, 2009 12:45 AM
  • Are you running win7 32-bit? I f so, that is the most amount of RAM 32-bit systems will recognize.

    Did you see how much hardware reserved memory there is? There is usually enough shared/hardware reserved memory to match the graphics card's memory.

    Hello! Please reply back, promptly if possible with the results to solutions to your problem!
    - JoelbX
    JoelbX's favorite threads
    Monday, September 21, 2009 1:15 AM
  • Windows 7 32 bit can only adress 3.3 GB. Install the 64 bit version, but becarfull your data will be lost. there is no upgrade option at this time (Ithink) a fresh clean slate Install

    Good Luck
    Monday, September 21, 2009 1:23 AM
  • Hi,

     

    On any 32-bit Operating System (not only Windows), we only have access to 4GB (232) of physical address space by default. 
     

    The issue is the way in which the hardware allocates memory for its own resources. The hardware needs to allocate memory space to use for things like the PCI bus, BIOS, the video card and others. Thus 4GB memory will not be fully displayed if a part of physical address space is used by other things. Generally it will display 2.75GB to 3.5GB.

     

    We can also refer to the following article. Here is the detailed explanation of the issue:

       

    http://blogs.technet.com/markrussinovich/archive/2008/07/21/3092070.aspx

    Monday, September 21, 2009 8:34 AM
  • Hi,

     

    On any 32-bit Operating System (not only Windows), we only have access to 4GB (232) of physical address space by default. 
     

    The issue is the way in which the hardware allocates memory for its own resources. The hardware needs to allocate memory space to use for things like the PCI bus, BIOS, the video card and others. Thus 4GB memory will not be fully displayed if a part of physical address space is used by other things. Generally it will display 2.75GB to 3.5GB.

     

    We can also refer to the following article. Here is the detailed explanation of the issue:

       

    http://blogs.technet.com/markrussinovich/archive/2008/07/21/3092070.aspx

    I have the same exact issue. It is the 64 bit OS not the 32 bit. RC 7100. any other ideas to why this may be happening to people? Its on a Fujitsu Lifebook N6420
    Tuesday, September 22, 2009 12:43 PM
  • One thing Jay is that your board may not support more than 4 GB ram.

    So Everyone in this thread, make sure that your board also supports the RAM amount you have/want.

    Hello! Please reply back, promptly if possible with the results to solutions to your problem!
    - JoelbX
    JoelbX's favorite threads | Skydrive | Cool 'gadget' programs
    Tuesday, September 22, 2009 3:29 PM

  • "So Everyone in this thread, make sure that your board also supports the RAM amount you have/want."

     

    How do you figure that out?

    Wednesday, December 01, 2010 9:45 PM