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Readyboost max's out at 4gb?

    Question

  • I put a 4gb sd card in and dedicated it to readyboost.. but it will only allow me to dedicate 4gb.. my machine has 4gb.. but I think its running an x86 copy of consumer preview so only 3 and change are available..  should I do anything else.. does it make sense to setting my swap file to the sdcard as well?  Second thought I don't think that's possible through the gui.

    Saturday, March 24, 2012 4:48 AM

Answers

  • By a low amount of RAM I meant 1 or 2GB. You can still use Ready Boost and see if it helps.

     

    If the SD card is FAT32, to format it to NTFS:

    In Windows Explorer, right click the flash drive, click Format, choose NTFS, and format it. Then try Ready Boost again.

     

    • Marked as answer by illafam Wednesday, March 28, 2012 1:23 AM
    Saturday, March 24, 2012 5:12 PM

All replies

  • I put a 4gb sd card in and dedicated it to readyboost.. but it will only allow me to dedicate 4gb.

    That would be expected - you can not use over 4GB with a 4GB card.

    If a larger SD card can only use 4GB, it's probably formatted as FAT32. Drives formatted as FAT32 can't store more than 4GB with Ready Boost. Try formatting it to NTFS (this will delete everything on the card - backup data first).

     

     

    my machine has 4gb.

    Ready Boost is meant for computers will low amounts of RAM, you won't notice much difference unless you're using programs that use huge amounts of memory.

     

     

    but I think its running an x86 copy of consumer preview so only 3 and change are available.

    The usable memory may be less than the installed memory on Windows 7 based computers:
    http://support.microsoft.com/kb/978610

     

    Saturday, March 24, 2012 5:04 AM
  • I made a mistake with my original post.. it's an 8GB SD Card.. not a 4GB one..Whats the best way to tell if its worth doing..  I mean in theory if you have 4GB of ram.. and looked in task manager.. and if I never breach 3gb of ram.. then nothing should ever swap or use readyboost as it is all contained in ram?  But with the older versions of windows my understanding was that even if you had unlimited amounts of ram some swapping still took place?
    Saturday, March 24, 2012 5:29 AM
  • By a low amount of RAM I meant 1 or 2GB. You can still use Ready Boost and see if it helps.

     

    If the SD card is FAT32, to format it to NTFS:

    In Windows Explorer, right click the flash drive, click Format, choose NTFS, and format it. Then try Ready Boost again.

     

    • Marked as answer by illafam Wednesday, March 28, 2012 1:23 AM
    Saturday, March 24, 2012 5:12 PM
  • Thanks Trek, that was my issue.
    Wednesday, March 28, 2012 1:23 AM
  • just a suggestion.. if i insert a sdcard and say dedicate it to readyboost the os should prompt and say you are using fat32.. would youlike to reformat with ntfs
    Saturday, March 31, 2012 5:23 AM
  • I find it makes a big difference on netbooks.. applications seems to snap open instead of load.
    Thursday, April 26, 2012 6:54 AM
  • It will only allow you to allocate 4GB from the SD card because the SD card is only 4GB! Ready Boost doesnt register your internal RAM, its used as a service to allocate solid state memory for use as a page file "virtual memory" so to speak. It works by caching frequently used files and programs for faster retrieval. So if you have a 4GB SD card and you format it for ready boost, then you will have a 4GB ready boost cache! If you want to use a larger SD card (say 8GB, etc), then you will need to buy a larger card and format the card as either exfat (extended file allocation table) or NTFS, otherwise you wont be able to use any more than 4GB! fat32 is 2 to the 32nd power (thats about roughly 4 billion bytes or 4GB). You max out with FAT32 at 4GB period, this is why 32 bit operating systems cannot utilize more than 4GB of RAM natively. OK, so heres what you do, and yes this works! Buy an 8GB SD card (SD ultra, dont be cheap. Should be atleast 20MB/sec read and 15MB/sec write, otherwise you are wasting your time). Now, insert the SD card, wait for the auto play prompt to show the system has recognized the device, then click start, computer and take note of the drive Letter assigned to the SD card. Open a command prompt. Click start, run, type CMD, now type: format e:\fs:exfat  this will format the drive with the extended FAT file system making it possible to use the entire drive (8GB for ready boost cache). Or you can type e:\fs:ntfs to format the drive as NTFS file system. Formatting with exfat will make ready boost run much faster as this file system has lower overhead than NTFS. NOTE: When I specified the drive letter E, I was referring to the drive letter that was assigned to my SD by the operating system. You need to make sure you followed the directions exactly as I stated or you could screw something up! your system could assign any drive letter depending what devices you already have installed. Just make sure you use the drive letter assigned to that device. If your SD card is assigned the G: drive letter then: format g:\fs:ntfs  GOT IT? very simple.  Figured I would provide an actual answer, being as no one else here knows how to read a question properly!  

    Djdaniel, CIO Epic IT Solutions


    • Edited by djdaniel150 Wednesday, June 20, 2012 6:44 PM
    Wednesday, June 20, 2012 6:41 PM
  • You're right, ReadyBoost is really just adding additional fast solid state cache to speed up accessing files that are being paged to disk due to low physical memory. Windows will attempt to use ReadyBoost first if it is available for paging, if not, it will write to the slower disk. 

    But you could be a little nicer about it.  :)


    Saturday, June 23, 2012 6:10 PM