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What is the purpose of the integration ?

    Question

  • I've used til now the old Virtual PC 2007 SP1. With Windows 98 SE on it. And I was very satisfied. I have used this machine on a network, under heavilly loading - having as host OS Windows XP and Vista.
    On this beta version of WVP I have created a new machine using my existing .vhd.
    First remark : you are not allowed to work with the settings if you are trying to point to an existing machine also, unless you are creating a new one.
    Second remark : the integration is on by definition and the process of analyze is extremely slow.

    After disabling the integration feature everything is working as before (on VPC 2007).

    So, I am reverting to the above question : why activate the integration (on Win98SE it is not possible, but on WinXP it is) if there are no reasons to do it ?

    And which could be such a reasons for Microsoft in order to impose thinks that appears not to be usefull for some users. I have applications that are working only on Windows 98SE and I am using them from inside the virtual machine. For the remaing applications I am using the host machine. Again, I do not understand the need of integration - which is in fact not an integration but only a way to use specific local resources in common. But if I need to use the local drives , or printers I may use the classical mapping mode of a network.
    And for the software - this will ever works better if launched directly from its host OS (host machine or virtual one).

    NB : I have tried to install the VMAdditions under this beta software. And it does work ! I have had only to change the assignment for the DVD : instead of the phisical drive I have changed it to point to the .iso file containing the VMAdditions.

    Please excuse my misunderstanding.
    Friday, May 15, 2009 8:04 AM

Answers

  • The Integration Services are not required. This is similar to Virtual PC 2007 which has Virtual Machine Additions, which are not required. Most people prefer using Integration Services when they are available. In addition to providing convenience, they also help improve performance of a virtual machine. They are not available to unsupported operating systems such as Windows 98. Just because an operating system is unsupported doesn't mean it won't work. Many unsupported operating systems work just fine.

    Classical mapping of drives is perfectly fine to do in a virtual machine. There's absolutely nothing wrong with that and depending on the circumstances and the requirements, it may be the most appropriate course of action.

    Speaking about virtual machines in general, some people prefer to access a running virtual machine via Remote Desktop Connection. It allows a virtual machine to displayed in full screen on any monitor resolution. It can also be used for sharing the physical machine's local resources such as printers and drives with the virtual machine.
    • Marked as answer by Florin Savu Monday, May 18, 2009 6:51 AM
    Monday, May 18, 2009 3:44 AM

All replies

  • Integration Components provide the following features:

    ·      Clipboard. You can cut, copy, and paste data between the host operating system and the guest operating system. For example, you can copy a URL from the browser in a guest operating system, and paste it to a browser in the host operating system.

    ·      Hard drives. This feature makes all the drives on the host available to the virtual machine. You can easily access all host data from within the virtual machine. 

    Note

    Host hard drives are listed in the guest by using the computer name of the host operating system. For example, on a host computer named WindowTest, the C drive would be listed in the guest operating system as ‘C on WindowsTest’.

    ·      Printers. This feature makes it possible to use the same printers in a virtual machine that you can use on the host. To share printers, when Windows XP is the guest operating system, you must also install the printer drivers. For more information, see “Scenario 3: Print from a virtual machine,” later in this guide.

    ·      USB devices. Printers, storage devices and smart card readers are automatically shared with virtual machines. Other types of supported USB devices are supported by redirecting them to the virtual machine. For more information, see “To use a USB device in a virtual machine,” later in this guide.

    Friday, May 15, 2009 9:46 AM
    Moderator
  • However Win98SE is not a supported operating system.
    Friday, May 15, 2009 9:49 AM
    Moderator
  • Thank you for your answer.

    Indeed, Win98SE is not a supported OS but it works as guest. However, the OS was installed using the VPC 2007, but I suppose it will be possible to install it even from this beta VPC.

    Considering the features of the integration - you said :

         Quote
        Hard drives. This feature makes all the drives on the host available to the virtual machine. You can easily access all host data from within the virtual machine. 

    Note

    Host hard drives are listed in the guest by using the computer name of the host operating system. For example, on a host computer named WindowTest, the C drive would be listed in the guest operating system as ‘C on WindowsTest’.

    ·      Printers. This feature makes it possible to use the same printers in a virtual machine that you can use on the host. To share printers, when Windows XP is the guest operating system, you must also install the printer drivers. For more information, see “Scenario 3: Print from a virtual machine,” later in this guide.

    ·      USB devices. Printers, storage devices and smart card readers are automatically shared with virtual machines. Other types of supported USB devices are supported by redirecting them to the virtual machine. For more information, see “To use a USB device in a virtual machine,” later in this guide.

    Unquote

    I am totally agree with you. However, excepting the clipboard, THESE FEATURES ARE NOT NEW. The hard drives, the printers and all external devices (not only USB) were shared with the virtual machine. The BIG DIFFERENCE is that now all of these are shared AUTOMATICALLY ?!? And not using a mapping command.

    So, my question is : Are these features of integration so important for reducing the performance (graphical and not only - as many people observed) of the Virtual machine ?

    As for mr. Devdeep Singh - MSFT , Moderator - which was marking YOUR answser to MY question as ANSWER - I am sorry , but repeating me the theory is not in fact an answer, according to my opinion. Maybe, in Microsoft opinion all it is said is good said and there is no place for more.

    I will still remain with the opinion that such features as integration are not necessary - at least with the degrade of the performance.

    Sunday, May 17, 2009 10:24 AM
  • The Integration Services are not required. This is similar to Virtual PC 2007 which has Virtual Machine Additions, which are not required. Most people prefer using Integration Services when they are available. In addition to providing convenience, they also help improve performance of a virtual machine. They are not available to unsupported operating systems such as Windows 98. Just because an operating system is unsupported doesn't mean it won't work. Many unsupported operating systems work just fine.

    Classical mapping of drives is perfectly fine to do in a virtual machine. There's absolutely nothing wrong with that and depending on the circumstances and the requirements, it may be the most appropriate course of action.

    Speaking about virtual machines in general, some people prefer to access a running virtual machine via Remote Desktop Connection. It allows a virtual machine to displayed in full screen on any monitor resolution. It can also be used for sharing the physical machine's local resources such as printers and drives with the virtual machine.
    • Marked as answer by Florin Savu Monday, May 18, 2009 6:51 AM
    Monday, May 18, 2009 3:44 AM
  • Thank you , John Paul.

    That is an answer and I marked it as it is.
    Monday, May 18, 2009 6:53 AM