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Tutorial to Gain Permissions to C drive in Windows 7

    Question

  • Hi guys,

                 It has taken me all day yesterday, all night and until now to work out how to remove this bloody inconvenience, i tried to the whole putting the 'copy to' and 'move to' which didn't work with 7, also i found another registry that puts a 'gain full access' as well which also gave no luck. I was realy sure you could do it with the permissions so i spent the whole night working it out.

    This is what you have to do:

    Right Click on your 'C drive' and go to 'Properties'. (here we are going to remove any permissions that were installed by the windows install)

    Click the 'Security' tab at the top and then 'Advanced' at the bottom of that tab

    Then go to the 'Owner' tab, at the bottom of the tab click on the 'Edit' button.

    In the new window that appears click on the user name you have created for your login, however make sure it isn't the one that has administrator after it.

    Once you have selected the user at the bottom there should be a select option to 'Replace owner on subcontainers and objects.'  You want to SELECT this option.

    Once selected click apply and wait for the box to finish loading.

     

    Ok now click ok, and come out of all the windows that have been opened. (to save confusion)

     

    Once again right click on your C drive and go to 'Properties'

    Then go to the 'Security' tab.

    At the bottom click on 'Advanced'

    Now you should automatically be on the 'Permissions' page, if so click 'Change Permissions'

    Then in this new window what you want to do is to 'Remove' all things here APART FROM the one that says 'Administrators/yourusernamehere'

    Once this is the only profile left click on it and then click on the 'Edit' button below.

    'Permissions entry for local disk (C:)' should appear, ok now click on 'Full Control' and then click 'OK'

    Then it will take you back to the permissions page where you deleted the other profiles, select the profile you just gave 'Full Access' too, tick the box underneath that says 'Replace all child object permissions with inheritable permissions from this object'

    Then click 'Apply' and wait for it to load through your C drive if your like me and have only just installed 7 it shouldn't take too long.

     

    Now what you need to do with some of the folder you may see a lock that appears, for some reason they have used the 'Sharing' feature like it is someone on a network in an office, so you can only access certain things, well if its your pc then you should be able to do what you likek with it.

    With some of the folders you can just right click and then select homeusers etc, with others you will need to go into 'Advanced Sharing' and then give full access to people you share with to be able to move/delete/edit the folder and things within it.

    Another thing you will want to do is type UAC in the start bar search and then pull the bar to the bottom and apply.

     

    Now you should be able to do what you like with your C drive. Hope this helps other people!!  If anyone has any questions or i wasn't clear please let me know :)

     

    Cheers

    Jem

     

    Wednesday, April 21, 2010 1:02 PM

Answers

  • True...however i tried this and does not work....and this was the only way...once again windows is rubbish and im glad i got a mac 5 years ago which converted me but my partner likes having a pc...

     

    This would change the owner of the files/folders to the account you specify (which may have adverse effects on some applications/programs/services).

    A simpler, faster and much safer way (without changing the ownership of the files/folders), would be to use the ICACLS tool:

    icacls C:\ /grant:r JohnDoe:(OI)(CI)M /T /C

    JohnDoe will be able to modify files and folders on the C: root. Permissioins are inheretid (through the OI and CI parameters) which means JohnDoe will have the same permission for all newly created files/folders under C:.

    Regards,

    Salvador Manaois III
    MCSE MCSA MCTS MCITP:EA/SA C|EH CIWA
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Bytes & Badz : http://badzmanaois.blogspot.com
    My Passion : http://flickr.com/photos/badzmanaois
    My Scripting Blog : http://sgwindowsgroup.org/blogs/badz


    • Marked as answer by macimaster86 Wednesday, April 21, 2010 3:00 PM
    Wednesday, April 21, 2010 2:50 PM

All replies

  • This would change the owner of the files/folders to the account you specify (which may have adverse effects on some applications/programs/services).

    A simpler, faster and much safer way (without changing the ownership of the files/folders), would be to use the ICACLS tool:

    icacls C:\ /grant:r JohnDoe:(OI)(CI)M /T /C

    JohnDoe will be able to modify files and folders on the C: root. Permissioins are inheretid (through the OI and CI parameters) which means JohnDoe will have the same permission for all newly created files/folders under C:.

    Regards,

    Salvador Manaois III
    MCSE MCSA MCTS MCITP:EA/SA C|EH CIWA
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Bytes & Badz: http://badzmanaois.blogspot.com
    My Passion: http://flickr.com/photos/badzmanaois
    My Scripting Blog: http://sgwindowsgroup.org/blogs/badz

    Wednesday, April 21, 2010 2:30 PM
  • True...however i tried this and does not work....and this was the only way...once again windows is rubbish and im glad i got a mac 5 years ago which converted me but my partner likes having a pc...

     

    This would change the owner of the files/folders to the account you specify (which may have adverse effects on some applications/programs/services).

    A simpler, faster and much safer way (without changing the ownership of the files/folders), would be to use the ICACLS tool:

    icacls C:\ /grant:r JohnDoe:(OI)(CI)M /T /C

    JohnDoe will be able to modify files and folders on the C: root. Permissioins are inheretid (through the OI and CI parameters) which means JohnDoe will have the same permission for all newly created files/folders under C:.

    Regards,

    Salvador Manaois III
    MCSE MCSA MCTS MCITP:EA/SA C|EH CIWA
    ----------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Bytes & Badz : http://badzmanaois.blogspot.com
    My Passion : http://flickr.com/photos/badzmanaois
    My Scripting Blog : http://sgwindowsgroup.org/blogs/badz


    • Marked as answer by macimaster86 Wednesday, April 21, 2010 3:00 PM
    Wednesday, April 21, 2010 2:50 PM
  • Strange, but I've used that same command on, easily, 50 machines and it worked like a charm ALL the time. =)

    Did you get any error when you ran the command?

    Regards,
    Salvador

    Wednesday, April 21, 2010 3:15 PM
  • no it just doesn't work, if you have read any of the other posts for some reason Windows 7 is rubbish (no suprise)...and won't let anyone do anything with their c drives
    Wednesday, April 21, 2010 5:49 PM
  • i did what macimaster 86 said in the first thread and now it really screwed my machine up can't access the c drive at all doesnt show up when i click on my computer how do i reverse this??? help
    Sunday, May 16, 2010 2:44 PM
  • I am having problems with my laptop, I have it for the purpose of saving embroidery files for a embroidery machine.. I just had to replace the hard drive in it, now it won't allow me to save my files to my drive c so that I can send them to my thumb drive or to the machine itself.. it tells me that I am not allowed to make changes yada yada... I am the sole owner and user of this lap top which I purchased in november of 2009.... what a total waste of money for a DELL product!! Thank you for any help that you can offer, I can't use it like it is... Dell wants $200.+ for software support to fix the problem they caused with a new hard drive..... I am so upset with DELL!!!!!!
    Tuesday, May 25, 2010 4:57 AM
  • The Tutorial was a success !!! I opened [dbl clicked] drive C and it opened to all my folders. I tried to access most all directories and also the files and all those directories/files opened just fine. Kinda funny:  ALL the directory folders have those little locks on them. I open all the directories and all the files in those directories look normal [ no locks on them]

    OK, I have full control of all the directories and the files.

    (QUESTION)? Will I have all rights for saving files and making changes without worrying that when I restart my computer the changes and work and even registry changes will be erased, gone and back to the state it was before I made all the changes, etc?. The Drive C: says not shared.

    Thank You for major relief JEM. :-)

    atruckerich@msn.com

    Sunday, June 20, 2010 7:34 PM
  • guys, i followed this word for word unfortunately i seem to have lost the admin profile, i can log in but am unable to access any of the program, they are not there any more, HELP.  Please email to ga4304@yahoo.com
    Friday, April 29, 2011 1:31 AM
  • Same thing here, this is ridiculous! How do we get access back without resetting?

     

    Answer: Add ownership to every account on the computer, some things may not work but in general its fixed

    Friday, April 29, 2011 5:26 AM
  • how to do that...?

     

    Saturday, May 07, 2011 5:16 AM
  • I'm trying to give a user access to a file on  the "C" drive on a Windows 7 machine.  I have given them "full" access by going to the file, right clicking on the file going to properties, advanced, adding the User name and giving them "Full Access", but I keep getting access denied.  The User need to be able to replace & save this file everytime they run a process that updates the data in this file on the "C" drive.  I don't want the User to have "Full" access to the entire "C" drive,  only on this 1 file.

    Any suggestions?

    Thank you.


    • Edited by Dora Lane Tuesday, July 17, 2012 3:43 PM
    Tuesday, July 17, 2012 3:40 PM
  • Hi I have tried the icacls command but gettinginvalid parameter "logonname:(OI) /T /C"
    Thursday, September 27, 2012 9:11 AM
  • Wow, thank you for posting this.

    From the looks of your article here it looks like this problem happens to people after installing or something else. To make my story brief...

    One evening in an attempt to gain access to areas of my C:\ that i did not have access to. I ended up manipulateing my own permissions and locked myself out.

    I am a college student going for a BS in Networking, so i know what I am doing in there. I spent 7+ hours trying to figure out how to undo, what i had done. I tryed everything from commands in powershell to recovery images. (I did not want to format!)

    And finally after changeing my search wording i stumbled on your article here and it made me able to access my C:\ again. Thank you

    It was quite a learning experience to learn from and taught me to be more careful when messing with permissions. Because (And i know this from my
    college courses, a single deny overrides any allow) I had done this it was very educational.

    Tuesday, October 16, 2012 3:17 PM