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Windows 7 Primary Partition

    Question

  • Hey guys, i wanted to know that if i make 2 primary partitions of 100gb each. In one i install windows 7, and in another i install windows xp. Then i want to know what is the difference between making 2 primary partitions and installing operating systems in each, if i want to dual boot i can have one primary partition and logical drives and i can install another OS in a logical drive. As far as i know in windows xp we used to make 2 primary partitions not to dual boot but primary partition keeps the booting files of the operating systems in it. So if i have windows 7 in C: and windows xp in D drive and both are primary so even if i delete the C: drive and active the D drive my windows xp will still run regardless if C is deleted which had windows 7. Do we use primary partition more than one for this same reason. Another thing i wanna know is that if i make 3 primary partitions only then i get extended partitions. How can i get one primary partition only and then extended partition

    Waiting for a reply


    Fahad Javed

    Wednesday, May 30, 2012 11:51 AM

Answers

  • Hi,

    Primary Partitions

    A primary partition may contain an operating system along with any number of data files (for example, program files, user files, and so forth). Before an OS is installed, the primary partition must be logically formatted with a file system compatible to the OS.

    If you have multiple primary partitions on your hard disk, only one primary partition may be visible and active at a time. The active partition is the partition from which an OS is booted at computer startup. Primary partitions other than the active partition are hidden, preventing their data from being accessed. Thus, the data in a primary partition can be accessed (for all practical purposes) only by the OS installed on that partition.

    If you plan to install more than one operating system on your hard disk, you probably need to create multiple primary partitions; most operating systems can be booted only from a primary partition.

    Extended Partitions

    The extended partition was invented as a way of getting around the arbitrary four-partition limit. An extended partition is essentially a container in which you can further physically divide your disk space by creating an unlimited number of logical partitions.

    An extended partition does not directly hold data. You must create logical partitions within the extended partition in order to store data. Once created, logical partitions must be logically formatted, but each can use a different file system.

    Logical Partitions

    Logical partitions may exist only within an extended partition and are meant to contain only data files and OSs that can be booted from a logical partition (for example, Linux, Windows NT, and so forth).


    Also see Understanding Disk Partitions and Disk partitioning

    Regards


    Vincent Wang

    TechNet Community Support

    Monday, June 04, 2012 7:33 AM
    Moderator

All replies

  • First of all you should have at least one more partition that sits at the beginning of disk. It is so called system partition. Look into documentation of WAIK for more detailes.

    Second I would recommend easier way how to configure multiboot, namely the use of EasyBCD instead of confoguring bcdedit file. (It is enough to use free version of EasyBCD http://neosmart.net/EasyBCD/ )

    Third I recommend to use another data partition at the end of disk.

    Fourth, there is possibility to hide disks in every operating system, namely in registry (NoDrive parameter)

    Regards

    Milos

    Wednesday, May 30, 2012 6:24 PM
  • 

    Hi,


    If you want to install Windows XP and Windows 7 to get dual boot, it is recommend you install Windows XP first and then install Windows 7 on another partition. Windows XP will not be affect even if you format Windows 7. The primary partitions or other kind of partitions is not the problem.


    More reference,


    Dual Boot Between Windows XP and Windows 7

    http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/video/dual-boot-between-windows-xp-and-windows-7.aspx


    Windows 7 - Dual Boot Installation with Windows 7 and XP

    http://www.sevenforums.com/tutorials/8057-dual-boot-installation-windows-7-xp.html


    Hope this helps


    Vincent Wang

    TechNet Community Support

    Friday, June 01, 2012 1:44 AM
    Moderator
  • Well i think i was unable to make you guys understand what i want to ask. Sorry about it. But i want to know for what reason do we make 2 or 3 primary partitions in windows 7. What is the difference between primary and extended and logical partitions. And also that what are the benefits of making 2 or more primary partitions. Thank You.


    Fahad Javed

    Friday, June 01, 2012 7:02 AM
  • Hi,

    Primary Partitions

    A primary partition may contain an operating system along with any number of data files (for example, program files, user files, and so forth). Before an OS is installed, the primary partition must be logically formatted with a file system compatible to the OS.

    If you have multiple primary partitions on your hard disk, only one primary partition may be visible and active at a time. The active partition is the partition from which an OS is booted at computer startup. Primary partitions other than the active partition are hidden, preventing their data from being accessed. Thus, the data in a primary partition can be accessed (for all practical purposes) only by the OS installed on that partition.

    If you plan to install more than one operating system on your hard disk, you probably need to create multiple primary partitions; most operating systems can be booted only from a primary partition.

    Extended Partitions

    The extended partition was invented as a way of getting around the arbitrary four-partition limit. An extended partition is essentially a container in which you can further physically divide your disk space by creating an unlimited number of logical partitions.

    An extended partition does not directly hold data. You must create logical partitions within the extended partition in order to store data. Once created, logical partitions must be logically formatted, but each can use a different file system.

    Logical Partitions

    Logical partitions may exist only within an extended partition and are meant to contain only data files and OSs that can be booted from a logical partition (for example, Linux, Windows NT, and so forth).


    Also see Understanding Disk Partitions and Disk partitioning

    Regards


    Vincent Wang

    TechNet Community Support

    Monday, June 04, 2012 7:33 AM
    Moderator