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How to check if you are an administrator

    Question

  • In XP, when you right-clicked on the Start button and saw "Open All Users" you knew that you were an administrator on that particular machine.

    Is there such a thing in Windows 7? I know I can go to control panel > User accounts, but I'm looking for something simple like in XP.

    Thanks

    Thursday, September 15, 2011 3:50 PM

Answers

  • I haven't found exactly what you're looking for, but a few quick, indirect methods I've used in the past include:

    • Running gpedit.msc > If you're not an admin it will tell you so
    • Entering "uac" (sans quotes) in Windows search > This starts up UAC if you have Admin rights and does nothing otherwise
    • Marked as answer by Robinson Zhang Thursday, October 06, 2011 4:34 PM
    Thursday, September 15, 2011 8:18 PM
  • As TrekDozer pointed out, you just have to click on the User picture. Refer screenshot (highlighted in red):

    After that you will see a screen which which will have something like this:

    If you see Administrator written in the place highlighted above, you are an Administrator. If you see Standard user written (as above), then you're not.

    Please revert back here if this does not address your question. Hope it helps!


    Kunal D Mehta - a Windows Server Enthusiast | My first TechNet Wiki Article
    • Marked as answer by Robinson Zhang Thursday, October 06, 2011 4:34 PM
    Friday, September 16, 2011 10:20 AM

All replies

  • This takes only two clicks, but it also brings up User Accounts, so you might not consider it more simple.

     

    1. Click Start.

    2. Click your user picture (not your user name). Your status will be displayed.

     

    • Proposed as answer by Nano Warp Friday, September 16, 2011 11:50 AM
    Thursday, September 15, 2011 5:08 PM
  • >> "Your status wil be displayed".

    I don't see anything that says if I'm admin or not. Does it matter if I'm in a domain environment?

    Thursday, September 15, 2011 5:38 PM
  • I haven't found exactly what you're looking for, but a few quick, indirect methods I've used in the past include:

    • Running gpedit.msc > If you're not an admin it will tell you so
    • Entering "uac" (sans quotes) in Windows search > This starts up UAC if you have Admin rights and does nothing otherwise
    • Marked as answer by Robinson Zhang Thursday, October 06, 2011 4:34 PM
    Thursday, September 15, 2011 8:18 PM
  • You can find the Windows 7 user control pane by launching the desktop control panel (Start - Control Panel - More settings).
    Thursday, September 15, 2011 8:24 PM
  • In XP, when you right-clicked on the Start button and saw "Open All Users" you knew that you were an administrator on that particular machine.

    Is there such a thing in Windows 7? I know I can go to control panel > User accounts, but I'm looking for something simple like in XP.

    Thanks

    Start --> Run --> Control UserpasswordS2
    MCP | MCTS | MCITP From Iraq
    Thursday, September 15, 2011 8:36 PM
  • Thank you all for the replies.

    Unfortunately, none are as easy as it was in XP. Guess I'll have to live with it.

    If anyone has any other suggestions, please chime in.

    Thank You again.

    Friday, September 16, 2011 12:39 AM
  • We need to wait for beta to see how difficult it will be. This preview is just for the Metro UI and for APIs.
    Friday, September 16, 2011 12:42 AM
  • We need to wait for beta to see how difficult it will be. This preview is just for the Metro UI and for APIs.
    I assume you are talking about windows 8, but the question was about windows 7.
    Friday, September 16, 2011 12:50 AM
  • Yes, you are right. I missed that, sorry :/
    Friday, September 16, 2011 12:53 AM
  • So another try but having Win7 in the context.

    I do not have a non-administrator account on hand, but try to right-click on the All programs text shown after clicking on the right menu. On an administrator account I see the Open All Users menu item there.

    Friday, September 16, 2011 12:56 AM
  • So another try but having Win7 in the context.

    I do not have a non-administrator account on hand, but try to right-click on the All programs text shown after clicking on the right menu. On an administrator account I see the Open All Users menu item there.

    That looked promising... but looks like it shows up (and opens up) regardless if you are admin or not.

    • Edited by bjohnrini Friday, September 16, 2011 1:38 AM
    Friday, September 16, 2011 1:37 AM
  • As TrekDozer pointed out, you just have to click on the User picture. Refer screenshot (highlighted in red):

    After that you will see a screen which which will have something like this:

    If you see Administrator written in the place highlighted above, you are an Administrator. If you see Standard user written (as above), then you're not.

    Please revert back here if this does not address your question. Hope it helps!


    Kunal D Mehta - a Windows Server Enthusiast | My first TechNet Wiki Article
    • Marked as answer by Robinson Zhang Thursday, October 06, 2011 4:34 PM
    Friday, September 16, 2011 10:20 AM
  • As TrekDozer pointed out, you just have to click on the User picture. Refer screenshot (highlighted in red):

    After that you will see a screen which which will have something like this:

    If you see Administrator written in the place highlighted above, you are an Administrator. If you see Standard user written (as above), then you're not.

    Please revert back here if this does not address your question. Hope it helps!


    Kunal D Mehta - a Windows Server Enthusiast | My first TechNet Wiki Article

    Sir , please go to 

     

    Start --> Run --> Control UserPasswordS2 --> Double click on User Name -->  Group Membership --> Change From Standard User to Administrator  --> Apply --> ok --> Log off --> log in   

     

    Regards,


    MCP | MCTS | MCITP
    Friday, September 16, 2011 11:55 AM
  • As TrekDozer pointed out, you just have to click on the User picture. Refer screenshot (highlighted in red):

    After that you will see a screen which which will have something like this:

    If you see Administrator written in the place highlighted above, you are an Administrator. If you see Standard user written (as above), then you're not.

    Please revert back here if this does not address your question. Hope it helps!


    Kunal D Mehta - a Windows Server Enthusiast | My first TechNet Wiki Article
    Only problem is that, on my machine it doesn't show "Standard user" or "Administator". Maybe this doesn't work on a domain?
    Friday, September 16, 2011 12:38 PM
  • If you are in a domain, you have a domain account. These accounts usually has more complex structure of user groups and their permission, so there is no easy way to define what "administrator" is. Sure, there is a Domain Admins group, but this has nothing to do with whether you can do something with your computer; this can be controlled not only per user but also per computer and in quite detailed level.

    Tuesday, September 20, 2011 3:21 PM
  • This is an example of a DOS bat/cmd method that will work on XP or Win7:

    @echo off
    "%systemroot%\system32\cacls.exe" "%systemroot%\system32\config\system" >NUL 2>&1
    if errorlevel 1 echo You do NOT have admin rights&& goto:END
    echo You DO have admin rights
    :END

    Wednesday, June 20, 2012 5:40 PM
    • Proposed as answer by disooqi55 Monday, July 02, 2012 11:36 AM
    • Unproposed as answer by bjohnrini Tuesday, November 13, 2012 12:54 AM
    Monday, July 02, 2012 11:36 AM
  • Best I could find was three clicks, and this works for computers in domain as well.  Click start, then click the user picture.  This brings up the user accounts app from the control panel.  Then select "Manage User Accounts".  If you have don't have admin rights, it will prompt you for a admin account and password.  If you do have admin rights, this will show you all the local and domain accounts that are in the local administrators group.
    Monday, November 12, 2012 10:35 PM
  • Hit the Windows key and run any utility that requires admin privileges and see if you are prompted for a username and password.

    e.g. regedit, winsat, msconfig, wusa

    Whatever is most memorable - I go for 'wusa' which I remember as 'Windows USer Admin' (though it is actually 'Windows Update Standalone Installer').

    Thursday, December 13, 2012 3:04 PM
  • open cmd prompt and type "net localgroup administrators". If you see your login in the list, you are an admin.
    Wednesday, July 24, 2013 2:49 PM
  • "net localgroup administrators"
    Just in case, the name of that group depends on the language, it's administratoren for me.  Another recipe discussed in this old thread also won't work for me; the Windows 7 Home editions have no gpedit.msc.   
    Wednesday, July 24, 2013 4:28 PM