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32 Bit Windows 7 and 4 gigabytes of RAm

    Question

  • is there a way to force the 32 bit versions of windows 7 to use more than 3 gigabytes of RAM.
    Thursday, March 18, 2010 6:14 PM

Answers

  • First, you can see how much RAM Windows has accessible to it in the System Properties dialog, or Task Manager's Performance page. Limits on memory and address space vary by platform, operating system, and by whether the IMAGE_FILE_LARGE_ADDRESS_AWARE value of the LOADED_IMAGE structure and 4-gigabyte tuning (4GT) are in use. IMAGE_FILE_LARGE_ADDRESS_AWARE is set or cleared by using the /LARGEADDRESSAWARE linker option. In addition, Limits on physical memory for 32-bit platforms also depend on the Physical Address Extension (PAE), which allows 32-bit Windows systems to use more than 4 GB of physical memory. 

    For more details, you can refer to this link: 

    http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa366778(VS.85).aspx 

    I hope this can help you.

     


    John
    Friday, March 19, 2010 3:02 AM
  • "dcdrac" wrote in message news:86705976-a99c-4e97-8403-0b04b7305d4c...

    > is there a way to force the 32 bit versions of windows 7 to use more
    > than 3 gigabytes of RAM.


    No, but 3GB of RAM is not an accurate number. Here's the story:

    All 32-bit client versions of Windows (not just Vista/XP/7) have a 4GB
    address space (64-bit versions can use much more). That's the
    theoretical upper limit beyond which you can not go.

    But you can't use the entire 4GB of address space. Even though you
    have a 4GB address space, you can only use *around* 3.1GB of RAM.
    That's because some of that space is used by hardware and is not
    available to the operating system and applications. The amount you can
    use varies, depending on what hardware you have installed, but can
    range from as little as 2GB to as much as 3.5GB. It's usually around
    3.1GB.

    Note that the hardware is using the address *space*, not the actual
    RAM itself. If you have a greater amount of RAM, the rest of the RAM
    goes unused because there is no address space to map it to.




    --
    Ken Blake, Microsoft MVP (Windows Desktop Experience) since 2003


    Ken Blake
    • Marked as answer by Linda Yan Wednesday, March 24, 2010 8:34 AM
    Friday, March 19, 2010 11:39 PM

All replies

  • No... the only way to fully use more than 3Gb is use the x64 version.  X64 version is so stable and compatible (i run it on 2 gaming systems), there really isnt a reason to run the 32bit version anymore.
    • Proposed as answer by DrX69 Thursday, March 18, 2010 6:39 PM
    Thursday, March 18, 2010 6:39 PM
  • wasn't there a command you could use im XP to make it use more than 3 gigabytes?
    Thursday, March 18, 2010 10:39 PM
  • First, you can see how much RAM Windows has accessible to it in the System Properties dialog, or Task Manager's Performance page. Limits on memory and address space vary by platform, operating system, and by whether the IMAGE_FILE_LARGE_ADDRESS_AWARE value of the LOADED_IMAGE structure and 4-gigabyte tuning (4GT) are in use. IMAGE_FILE_LARGE_ADDRESS_AWARE is set or cleared by using the /LARGEADDRESSAWARE linker option. In addition, Limits on physical memory for 32-bit platforms also depend on the Physical Address Extension (PAE), which allows 32-bit Windows systems to use more than 4 GB of physical memory. 

    For more details, you can refer to this link: 

    http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa366778(VS.85).aspx 

    I hope this can help you.

     


    John
    Friday, March 19, 2010 3:02 AM
  • Thank i have Windows 7 Ultimate so onice i have understood the PAE instructions I will give it a go
    Friday, March 19, 2010 5:01 PM
  • Ok do edit boot.ini for this?

     

    Enabling PAE

    Windows automatically enables PAE if DEP is enabled on a computer that supports hardware-enabled DEP, or if the computer is configured for hot-add memory devices in memory ranges beyond 4 GB. If the computer does not support hardware-enabled DEP or is not configured for hot-add memory devices in memory ranges beyond 4 GB, PAE must be explicitly enabled.

    To explicitly enable PAE, use the following BCDEdit /set command to set the pae boot entry option:

    bcdedit /set [{ID}] pae ForceEnable
    Friday, March 19, 2010 5:02 PM
  • "dcdrac" wrote in message news:86705976-a99c-4e97-8403-0b04b7305d4c...

    > is there a way to force the 32 bit versions of windows 7 to use more
    > than 3 gigabytes of RAM.


    No, but 3GB of RAM is not an accurate number. Here's the story:

    All 32-bit client versions of Windows (not just Vista/XP/7) have a 4GB
    address space (64-bit versions can use much more). That's the
    theoretical upper limit beyond which you can not go.

    But you can't use the entire 4GB of address space. Even though you
    have a 4GB address space, you can only use *around* 3.1GB of RAM.
    That's because some of that space is used by hardware and is not
    available to the operating system and applications. The amount you can
    use varies, depending on what hardware you have installed, but can
    range from as little as 2GB to as much as 3.5GB. It's usually around
    3.1GB.

    Note that the hardware is using the address *space*, not the actual
    RAM itself. If you have a greater amount of RAM, the rest of the RAM
    goes unused because there is no address space to map it to.




    --
    Ken Blake, Microsoft MVP (Windows Desktop Experience) since 2003


    Ken Blake
    • Marked as answer by Linda Yan Wednesday, March 24, 2010 8:34 AM
    Friday, March 19, 2010 11:39 PM