none
Why am I being charged 24 hours / day compute for my web role?

    Question

  • So I have a single Web role in my subscription, and I know it's not being hit very hard at all (10 visits a day if I'm lucky) running .NET MVC 3.

    My billing last month was £68, which seemed excessive. I've taken a look and I'm being charged for 24 / 7 use of COMPUTE on my subscription, which can't be right. Surely compute is based on the CPU usage of my process? And unless IIS is murdering the CPU it shouldn't be 24 hours per day compute.

    My instance isn't running anything other than this web role. Is this normal? If it is, I'll have to reconsider hosting on Azure, which I'd prefer not to have to do.

    Sunday, August 12, 2012 10:08 AM

Answers

  • To elaborate on jrboddie's answer, Windows Azure billing model is consumption based and by consumption, it is between you (as a client) and Windows Azure and not between you (as a provider) and your clients. Since you have deployed an application, Windows Azure has allocated some resources (Virtual Machines) for you which your application is consuming.

    There're a few alternatives:

    1. If you're using Windows Azure Cloud Services, you can delete your deployments when you know your application will not be used. Once an application is deleted, your application is no longer consuming any resources thus you will not be charged.

    2. Take a look at Windows Azure Websites (http://www.windowsazure.com/en-us/home/scenarios/web-sites/). This is a low cost alternative to hosting Cloud Services and is somewhat similar to shared hosting provided commonly. You may find this blog post useful to get a better understanding of the differences between different hosting options in Windows Azure: http://davidpallmann.blogspot.in/2012/07/windows-azure-is-3-lane-highway-how-to.html

    • Proposed as answer by Carlos Sardo Sunday, August 12, 2012 2:17 PM
    • Marked as answer by Tim Genge Sunday, August 12, 2012 10:59 PM
    Sunday, August 12, 2012 1:35 PM

All replies

  • You are billed by the time that the role is deployed--not execution (CPU) cycles.
    Sunday, August 12, 2012 12:27 PM
  • To elaborate on jrboddie's answer, Windows Azure billing model is consumption based and by consumption, it is between you (as a client) and Windows Azure and not between you (as a provider) and your clients. Since you have deployed an application, Windows Azure has allocated some resources (Virtual Machines) for you which your application is consuming.

    There're a few alternatives:

    1. If you're using Windows Azure Cloud Services, you can delete your deployments when you know your application will not be used. Once an application is deleted, your application is no longer consuming any resources thus you will not be charged.

    2. Take a look at Windows Azure Websites (http://www.windowsazure.com/en-us/home/scenarios/web-sites/). This is a low cost alternative to hosting Cloud Services and is somewhat similar to shared hosting provided commonly. You may find this blog post useful to get a better understanding of the differences between different hosting options in Windows Azure: http://davidpallmann.blogspot.in/2012/07/windows-azure-is-3-lane-highway-how-to.html

    • Proposed as answer by Carlos Sardo Sunday, August 12, 2012 2:17 PM
    • Marked as answer by Tim Genge Sunday, August 12, 2012 10:59 PM
    Sunday, August 12, 2012 1:35 PM
  • Thanks Gaurav. I've taken a look at WAWS, which appears the same are Cloud Services... that is, you need to use the "Reserved" model to have a DNS published site (the free won't do), which works out the same cost as a Cloud Web role (probably the same thing!).

    I have instead dropped my instance down to an XS instance - that should significantly drop my bill.

    Sunday, August 12, 2012 11:01 PM