none
Hyper-V and Display resolution

    Frage

  • Hi there,

     

    I am trying to increase the display resolution to 1600x1050 for my virual server (Hyper-v), but the max I can get is 1280x1024.

    I installed the Integration services and all the updates for the host os (win 2008 Enterprise) and guest os (win 2003 R2 Enterprise).

     

    any idea?

     

    Thanks,

    LOA

    Donnerstag, 17. April 2008 04:15

Antworten

  • 1600x1200 is the limit. RDP is your only option to exceed those dimensions. There are no other virtual display adapters.

     

    Freitag, 18. April 2008 06:06
    Moderator

Alle Antworten

  • We are assuming that your video card supports this resolution.

     

    If that is true, then it should be allowed.

     

    Have you tried accessing the VM by RDP from a workstation that supports this resoultion already?

     

     

    Donnerstag, 17. April 2008 14:55
    Moderator
  • Adding to what BrianEh correctly said, I'll expand your question and make a few comments.

     

    When you are using the native tools that come with Virtual PC, Virtual Server, and Hyper-V to connect to and interact with your virtual machine, the maximum suppoort resolution is 1600x1200. This limit does not apply to a Remote Desktop Connection (RDP), provided that the video driver supports a larger limit and as BrianEh pointed out, that the display supports a larger limit.

     

    Display problems are increasingly common for people who do demos. Many people use laptops that support 1680x1050. If Virtual PC is used for a demo and it is switched to fullscreen mode, it won't fill the screen because the laptop's 1680 horizontal resolution exceeds the 1600 resolution of Virtual PC.

     

    For Virtual PC and Virtual Server, always have the Virtual Machine Additions installed to maximize your video experience. And for Hyper-V, always have Integration Services installed. These components essentially do a virtual video driver update.

    Donnerstag, 17. April 2008 15:11
    Moderator
  • Using RDP I can reach the desirable resolution but not with the Hyper-V native tools. The thing is using RSP we have to compromise the speed.

     

    I have all the latest updates and integration services setup already so is there any other way to get to 1680x1050?

    Are there any other Hyper-V virtual display adapters available to be installed? The default display adapter has 4MB of ram only.

     

    Thanks

     

     

     

    Freitag, 18. April 2008 02:59
  • 1600x1200 is the limit. RDP is your only option to exceed those dimensions. There are no other virtual display adapters.

     

    Freitag, 18. April 2008 06:06
    Moderator
  • Are there any plans to ever support additional resolutions of 1680x1050 or 1920x1200 with HyperV client or with Virtual PC?

    Mittwoch, 23. April 2008 18:46
  • I just would like to know if there are any plans to address this any time soon too? RDP isn't a very good solution to this problem as it hampers performance. There are no wide-screen resolutions supported at all it seems? this is odd because try to buy a monitor that isn't wide screen now and its a real challenge... yes its possible but no machines ship without wide-screen.
    Mittwoch, 21. Mai 2008 13:39
  • I know this is an old thread now, but this is a bit of a hindrance for me.  Running at 1400x900 with the VMC toolbar, VMC status bar (which there's no option to hide??), the Windows taskbar, and the window decorations, my only really usable resolution on the console is 800x600.  I can squeeze into 1024x768 if I turn off the VMC toolbar, but the VMC status bar gets a bit clipped by the Windows taskbar and the right-hand quarter of my desktop is still unused.

    Not being able to pick a widescreen resolution like 1280x720 or my host's native 1400x900 to run in fullscreen is kind of disappointing.
    Freitag, 22. August 2008 10:43
  • Mikey Cooper said:
     but this is a bit of a hindrance for me.  Not being able to pick a widescreen resolution like 1280x720 or my host's native 1400x900 to run in fullscreen is kind of disappointing.

    I completely agree with you. I just can't understand why they can't offer more resolutions and colors. It's not like these resolutions just came out yesterday. Seems like remote desktop is going to be their "workaround".

    Montag, 25. August 2008 13:54
  • HappyFirst said:

    Seems like remote desktop is going to be their "workaround".


    Unfortunately this doesn't work for those of us who disable remote desktop on our VMs.
    Dienstag, 26. August 2008 20:22
  • Mikey Cooper said:

    HappyFirst said:

    Seems like remote desktop is going to be their "workaround".


    Unfortunately this doesn't work for those of us who disable remote desktop on our VMs.


    Too bad, and sad by microsoft

    They claim to have developed the best virtual machine enviroment ever with hyper-v...

    I also have a 1680x1050 monitor, and I need/want that resolution in full-screen, but not through RDP, cause some apps I run, DO NOT WORK under RDP...

    good 'workaround' once again...

    I didn't know what else to try .. but now I know I have to give up...

    Anyway, thanks for the info guys

    by the way, this forum is sharepoint, isn't it?

    MCSE 2003
    Montag, 29. Dezember 2008 21:32
  • Forget the complaints regarding RDP (as nice as a streaming HD session would be). The real issue is when using a VM for VPN access. Myself along with many others completely despise using the number of dreadful VPN clients out there. To this day they seem incompatible with Vista and the vendor websites offer only silly excuses for their prehistoric software. With that, I'm no security expert and have tried a number of things to continue using an RDP session after connected to the VPN. They seem to disconnect even if my network is listed as an allowed local network on the VPN server. The only other option is to run the Virtual Machine Connection software. I absolutely will not install any of these clients on my production physical machine (and I'm running a Windows 7 CTP).
    As everyone here knows, the Virtual Machine Connection software offers only a limited number of options when dealing with supported IC display adapter resolutions. This holds true when using the remote management tools for Vista, Windows 7, Server 2008 or System Center Virtual Machine Manager. I've tried so many things to change this; registry settings, unsupported drivers, application parameters, nvidia and ati tweak apps, etc. I'm here so as you might have guessed none have worked.
    I can't take hearing how it's designed for a server, etc, etc, etc. *HP offers widescreen flat panels for the server room now a days so were's the support. Where are some of the unofficial workarounds I've been so accustom to? I think a number of us would settle for anything just to fill up the screen a bit more.

    Thanks,
    Zac Boyles




    *I actually have no idea if HP or any other vendor for that matter offers widescreen flat panels for the server room. This statement is meant as a joke so lighten up.
    Freitag, 20. März 2009 00:23
  • This is a significant pain point for my team.  Please seriously consider adding support for 8MB video RAM, or some way to support up to 1600x1200 @ 32-bit color depth (widescreen isn't an issue for me, but support for higher 4:3, 16:9, 16:10 resolutions in general would be great).  RDP is not an acceptable solution.

    I realize the main goal with Hyper-V was WS08 deployments, but the versatility of having a virtualization environment that can cover the full capability of XP, WS03, Vista, WS08, and Win7 is invaluable for test teams.

    Freitag, 27. März 2009 19:56
  • The best solution I've come up with at the moment is using SCVMM's portal site to connect to the child machines. This allows you to bypass the RDP and connect through hyper-v directly. There are two benefits I've noticed so far; No need for the child machines to have active local/internet access (ie when using VPN) and a few additional resolutions (4:3 only though). The activex control works fine with IE 7 & 8 RTW under Vista & Server 2008. I have had issues connecting to a child through the SCVMM portal when using Win7 build 7000's * Server 2008 R2 beta's IE 8 beta. Also, Firefox and Opera don't seem to work either.

    Still though, it's worth checking out. I think MSDN or TechNet has a full SCVMM 2008 VHD for download. Check it out and be sure to use the portal to connect. It's like the Virtual Server's activex vpc web access but using Hyper-V's Virtual Machine Connection (or whatever it's called) but additional resolutions and ability to bypass the network access requirement of RDP.

    -Zac
    Freitag, 27. März 2009 20:24
  • We are currently using the SCVMM 2008 infrastructure, but it does not support 32-bit color at resolutions above 1152x864.

    If virtual guest services are installed, the color depth is limited to 16-bit at the console.
    Apparently there is a workaround by installing the default video driver, but I've yet to make this work.
    ..and avoiding guest services installation is impossible on some x64 OS editions, which require it for the network drivers.

    Can the Hyper-V team not see the versatility to test teams of having a huge VHD library of Windows flavors, in x86 and x64, in many different languages?  Where's the support for universal 32-bit color at 1280x1024 at a minimum?
    Are there plans to upgrade the guest services video driver with the acquisition of Kidaro & Calista?
    Freitag, 27. März 2009 20:58
  • Thanks for the link Mike, I'll check it out. In the mean time I wish I knew what all was involved with display drivers... well drivers period. Perhaps we could make a proposition to the people involved with the 'hacked' ATI and NVIDIA drivers as well as those involved in 'hacked' NVIDIA drivers for special Mac support. If they can altering the way cards handle 3d graphics, fan speeds, etc not to mention taking the 0% support for Mac (on unsupported PC's) all the way to 80-100% support they MUST be able to add a few extra resolutions/color depths. Just thinking out loud.
    Freitag, 27. März 2009 21:14
  • Why the mention of ATI/NVidia drivers?  The video hardware is virtual -- there is no access to the host's GPU at all.
    No amount of software tweaks will affect the underlying 4MB virtual video 'hardware' that is present on all Hyper-V VMs.
    As far as I understand it, this issue is directly in the hands of the Windows Virtualization team.
    Freitag, 27. März 2009 21:23
  • I mentioned them because of their talent which I lack. I'm saying that if MS is unable/unwilling to support this then there are people who do similar work in a similar area for *fun*. Figured that, as I'm no direct help, perhaps someone else could create a new virtual display adapter driver.

    FYI, I installed the standard vga driver and 32-bit is supported up to 1152x864, then I can bring it to 1600x1200 at 16-bit. I've only tested this under the SCVMM portal and 1600x1200 is not really that res, I'm not sure if the SCVMM portal is scaling it (though it doesn't have the normal granulation when it scaled it using the default vm bus display driver) or something else is happening. Regardless, it is a bit sluggish but not horrible. Then again I'm RDPing into a Virtual who then hits the portal page and connects to the other virtual through the portal... Then that virtual uses VPN and opens another RDP into other machines (one of those machines I actually have to use RDP again to another machine)....... take that Ben jk.

    Speaking of Ben, it must be really hard to constantly try to back Hyper-V to all of us though there are these tiny, yet horrible little issues for the people first exposed to it. The stance is that I'd expect from someone if I called support "I'm sorry Sir but this is not what the product was intended for"... No kidding. I'm a MSDN, TechNet and Connect member/participant. Why can't MS have some Geek membership where I'm not told that Zune isn't support on a server and instead they tell me how to go around the installer...? The EULA for membership could state a single sentence: "By agreeing to this EULA, you are on our own".
    Freitag, 27. März 2009 21:40
  • Same problems here... Any chance Microsoft to fix this on the new R2?
    Sonntag, 10. Mai 2009 19:56
  • Is there STILL really no way to use the host resolution of a laptop when running Server 2008 R2 without using RDP !  Laptop is 1366 x 768, can only select 1024 x 768 in VM! grr
    Mittwoch, 21. April 2010 10:47
  • Last year Microsoft produced a hotfix for Virtual PC 2007 SP1 that enabled screen resolutions of 2048x1920 (32bit). If they can do this for a legacy product, why doesn't Hyper-V in Windows 2008 R2 have this functionality? See http://support.microsoft.com/kb/958162. I expect it is only a few tweaks to the drivers & they obviously have the code since they have done this for Virtual PC.

    I am running VM that needs VPN activated to access other remote servers. Due to this I cannot use Remote Desktop since VPN disables local LAN (I have no control over this). So I am restricted to 1600x1200 instead of 1920x1200 on my 24" monitor.

     

    Donnerstag, 6. Mai 2010 08:27
  • Two years of complaints about Hyper-V screen resolution and not a **** thing has changed? Microsoft Virtualization team: Upgrade the Virtual Machine Bus Video Device please. The silly 1280x1024 resolution but no 1440x900 or 1650x1080 is ... silly.
    • Als Antwort vorgeschlagen CodeSlinger Montag, 6. Dezember 2010 22:31
    Montag, 7. Juni 2010 06:39
  • Two years?  Considering they had 5+ years of complaints with VPC.

    This does suck though, RDP is a solution, but I have to VPN in on my guest machine (it's a development image).  I'd also like to urge MS to do something with this ASAP, and I mean next day or two lol :)

    I left VPC to use VBox because they supported the resolution of the app I need to develop for, VPC and now Hyper-V doesn't.  Please do something MS.

    Montag, 30. August 2010 20:37
  •   What is so hard about RDP? If in the future you decide to use RemoteFX (currenly in beta as part of SP1) you must use RDP. Trying to use the other option gives you a black screen with an error message. RemoteFX is the implementation of the technology purchased from Calista mentioned above by Mike Barr.

     


    Bill
    Dienstag, 31. August 2010 00:35
  • Simply put, I work on an internal application that is designed for 1600x1050 monitors and my development is done through virtual machines.  Right now we're trying to use Hyper-V with R2, but since it requires us to connect to a VPN (since we're an offisite consulting company), we can't keep an RDP connection once we VPN in.

    We're using a CheckPoint VPN system which takes over the adapter.  If you can explain how to keep a RDP connection from the host while the guest isn't "visible" on the network then there isn't a major issue with using RDP.  But as it stands right now, with CheckPoint we can't RDP once the VPN connected and that's the problem.

    Donnerstag, 2. September 2010 17:29
  • I do not understand why is it impossible to make a good virtualization system?

    Virtual-PC will eventually break your guest system from time to time.

    VMWARE - if is running for long time (1-2 days) is starting to swallow a lot of your RAM and becomes very slow.

    VirtualBox - maybe it will become the best virtualization program, but right now it seems it has some huge performance issues for Win 7 x64 as host and Win 2008 (R2) x64 as guest. However the resize on the fly for the VM window is very very cool because it also changes the guest resolution to fit the host window. It seems VirtualBox even has 3d acceleration for guest OS (hint: you have to install the Vbox guest additions in safe mode if your guest OS is Windows).

    Hyper-V - probably the best virtualization system from performance perspective (at least if it has Windows OS as guests), but this resolution problem is really really annoying.

    1. Some of users cannot use RDP because of networking configurations and so on. 

    2. I'm a developer and I need to develop solutions for SharePoint 2007 and SharePoint 2010 at the same time. Of course I need at least 2 machines so I have one physical and one virtual. I have to switch all the time between the virtual one and physical. If virtual has a lower resolution then is like every 5-10 minutes you change your monitor from a bigger one to a smaller one and then from smaller to bigger and so on. Is really really annoying as developer to have different workspace areas all the time . RDP is also not acceptable since on my physical I have all my instant messaging systems and I have to discuss frequently with my colleagues.

    I have 1920x1080 on my physical so you can imagine how is to change to 1600x1200 (not even wide resolution) all the time.

    I guess this is Microsoft they never cared about feedbacks from developers they only care about normal end users...

    Donnerstag, 23. September 2010 20:50
  • My two new wide screen monitors on my Windows 7 box that I use to RDP to Server 2008 with are 1920x1080 native resolution and work with 2008 server just fine. From 2008 server I start another Windows 7 system as a VM using the Hyper-V connect feature so that the virutal console is effectively on my Windows 2008 server monitors even though those are via RDP. The Windows 7 system running in the VM sees 1280x1024 and 1600x1200 but not the native size of the 2008 server consoles even in advanced mode and list all formats. When I had two 1280x1024 consoles it all worked fine but I guess the Hyper-V integrated virtual console will not support wide screen formats. I would RDP directly into the virtual Win7 box but it is running a Cisco VPN client and shuts off all other network access including RDP into itself. If I could get the Cisco client to let RDP in then I would not have as much an issue with the virtual console not supporting the wide screen physical console. Any suggestions? Thanks, Dave
    Montag, 6. Dezember 2010 22:31
  • Cisco AnyConnect actually has the capability to allow RDP into the VM and then establish a VPN with split tunneling but it has to be configured by the network administrator.

    This document http://www.cisco.com/en/US/docs/security/vpn_client/anyconnect/anyconnect23/release/notes/anyconnect23rn.html talks about how to set the

    WindowsVPNEstablishment option to LocalUsersOnly or to AllowRemoteUsers but it has to be configured by the administrator else you get a dialog from the Cisco VPN AnyCOnnect client with the message "VPN Establishement capability from a remote desktop is disabled. A VPN Connection will not be established.".

    Montag, 6. Dezember 2010 23:48
  • Is there Any update here from Microsoft Team?

    Is there any plan for upgrading the VM Graphic driver by MS Team?

    As I'm using VMs with no Network Connectivity, The only solution is VMConnect and the users need to use Wide Screen systems.

     

    Mittwoch, 2. Februar 2011 10:58
  • The problem with RDP is having to have a valid network connection between the host VM and the guest VM.  sometimes this is not possible, or too difficult to manage - especially if you take into account that people giving demo's are typically sales executives, and are not skilled enough to go ip address hacking.

    It gets even more tricky with virtual machines that we get from Microsoft (Demo images), for example for SharePoint and Project Server 2010.  Because of the AD requirements of SharePoint, the VM must be configured as a Domain Controller, which complicates things somewhat when trying to connect to it using RDP.  Again, one can work around these issues, but why do we have too?  As posters have mentioned, Microsoft have made higher resolutions available for Virtual PC - why is this not possible for Hyper-V?  Also, if you need to run two MS Demo VMs at the same time its effectively almsot impossible to get the network configuration right to make both of them available via RDP at the same time.  (IP Address conflicts).

    As posters have pointed out, sometimes there is a security requirement to block RDP.  You personally might not be able to understand why its required, but that doesn't mean that someone out there has these requirements for whatever reason.

     


    http://blogs.umtsa.co.za/nicoo
    Dienstag, 22. Februar 2011 17:52
  • I rely on a virtual machine in order to make a VPN connection. The VPN connection prevents all incoming network trafic, which means that RDP is out of the question.

    This leaves me with 2 choices:

    1) Use Hyper-V client to connect to the virtual machine and accept a low screen resolution.
    2) Use VMWare instead of Hyper-V.

    I prefer to use Hyper-V because I don't have to buy an additional software license, but having a widescreen display and only being able to use a low resolution seems like a waste of money spent on the screen as well.

    Mittwoch, 23. März 2011 09:40
  • HI,

    We have the same problem as Mr. Anderson. We use a VM to connect to a remove office over VPN and the VPN is configured to not allow the VM to be accessed using RDP (the VPN doesn't allow split tunnel).

    In this situation we've not found a way to use display resolution 1680x1050 using the VM in Hyper-V without RDP.

    Microsoft guys, when do you plan to support 1680x1050 without RDP?

    Cheers,

    Daniel



    Mittwoch, 23. März 2011 18:46
  • Just to add another point for those who were asking "Why not just RDP?", one issue with RDP for those of us with visual impairment is that RDP doesn't support remote DPI.  I have to turn all my text sizes up to 125% in the Display settings to be able to effectively read anything on my screens.  When using RDP into another system, my remote session is forced back to 100% with no way to change it.  Logging into the Console via the Hyper-V Manager correctly used my 125% DPI but saddled me with a 4:3 resolution.

    To use Hyper-V, I had to log in via Hyper-V Manager to get 125%, disconnect, and then RDP into my disconnected session to get widescreen resolution.  This eventually became enough of a pain that I just switched to a competitor's product that supports any resolution at all that I want.  I miss the dynamic memory management of Hyper-V, but being able to see the servers is more important to me.  Hopefully this gets addressed (either the RDP DPI or the Hyper-V widescreen res) in a future revision.

    Dienstag, 10. Mai 2011 15:09
  • I hate to sound like an "also-ran" but I feel compelled to toss in my two centavos, kopeks, rupees, or whatever.

    What *I* do is Software QA, so like d.wagner and Calin Naghi, I am [fastened] to the wall by this.  I have apps to test in various environments that would be prohibitively expensive if I had to implement every stinkin' environment in physical hardware.  Since over 90% of the stuff I do is in Windows, (the other 10, plus or minus, is in Linux), I went with the "native" windows virtualization solution.

    Insofar as I can tell, there are major issues here with the Microsoft Hyper-V solutions. regardless of flavor (2k8 Server, Hyper-V, etc. etc.)

    • You (apparently) cannot run a desktop enabled VM on the same machine that Hyper-V Server 2008 is on, using the same physical display hardware, etc. . . .   In order to do this you need to run the VM's within a full-bore install of 2k8Server.
    • Running a VM within 2k8 - so you get the single-box capability - imposes an unacceptable performance hit.  Even on reasonably bad-[donkey] hardware.  IMHO, I should not have to go out and buy a cluster of NVIDIA desktop super-computers just to get acceptable guest performance.
    • Thew allowable video resolutions and color depths are just plain silly.
    • You cannot "monitor" and "use" the guest VM on the same screen, so to speak.  To "monitor" the guest, you need to use the tiny-screen offered within the HyperV manager - this allows you to see if there are any boot or configuration issues while the sytem is coming up.  Once the system is up, then - and only then - can you switch to the Remote Desktop connection to get a reasonable graphical resolution.  Likewise, you cannot have both the "monitor" (hyper-V manager connect window), and the RD window logged in at the same time.
    • I have not been able to migrate a virtual system created on Win2k8 Server (R2/SP1) to a Hyper-V Server (R2/SP1) system without rebuilding the VM.  (Maybe you can, but I'll be darned if *I* have been able to figure it out!)  I am assuming the converse is also true.
    • Etc.  I am sure that with a few more hours of "stick-time" on the Microsoft VM's I'll come up with more issues. . . .

    Now fair is fair, and I will freely admit that building a half-way decent virtual environment is a non-trivial task no matter what anyone says.  Heck!  Building a half-decent *PHYSICAL* system that doesn't crash every time you look at it cross-wise is a non-trivial task.

    I had the distinct pleasure of reading (parts of) the O'Reilly book Undersanding the Linux Kernel (Third edition by Bovet & Cassati), and boy was that an eye-opener!  It takes an entire THICK chapter, (and then some!), to describe the very first part of the boot process - getting the processor to actually boot and then go from "real" mode to "protected" mode.  They have to jump through hoops, juggle elephants, deal three-handed canasta, walk on water and pass miracles at will.  And that's with just ONE processor / core.  Jesus help you if there is more than one. . . . .

    Reading the chapter(s) about virtual memory management made my differential equations class in college look like simple addition.  For all you developers and QA people out there, I heartily recommend this as a read.  You will be soooo glad all you have to do is write/test apps.

    All of this notwithstanding, Microsoft obviously has some really smart people working there on this stuff, and they've had several generations of product to work with to get the kinks out.  Especially since other virtual solutions have been able to implement this so well.

    Microsoft has billed all this "virtualization" stuff as being The Next Big Thing.  It walks on water and talks to the angels.  Developers and sysadmin people will be liberated from the constraints of physical hardware.  And so on.

    @Microsoft:

    None of us are asking you to hang on the Cross.  All we would like to see is some transparency here.  Just tell us what's going on - what's currently planned, what's in the pipeline, what ideas are being experimented with for release in the next couple of major releases, etc.  This will go a long way toward managing our expectations so that we can also plan.  We also have bosses we answer to, and we need to be able to talk to them in a coherent way so that they can both plan and help manage the expectations of the folks higher up in the food-chain.

    We also know that things do change.  When they DO change, tell us.  Give us a brief explanation of what motivated the change and what efforts were made to mitigate it, if any.  We understand that your job is not easy.  Neither is ours.  And we are willing to do whatever we reasonably can to help you to help us.  What you folks need to do is help us help you.  Fair?

    Additionally, please, please, PLEASE listen to your user-base as the original assumptions you may have had about the "typical user" for your virtualization products may not be valid anymore.  It's a lot like Rogaine - it was originally developed as a blood-pressure medication, a job that it does fairly well.  Though a fairly effectrive blood-pressure medication, it had a very interesting side-effect:  It was *VERY* good at promoting hair growth!

    What say ye?

    Jim


    • Bearbeitet Jharris1993 Mittwoch, 1. Juni 2011 22:49 typograpical edits / edit for clairty
    Mittwoch, 1. Juni 2011 22:12
  • I am using the Hyper-V console to establish a VPN connection to test customer environments.

    I do this so I can work remotely and have access to a secure customer connection without losing access to corporate network resources.

    I use RDP to connect to the Hyper-V host and start the Hyper-V console for my VM and establish a VPN connection.

    Most of what I do in the console connection is analyzing log files or side-by-side comparisons of XML application .config files.

    The wider the display, the better this works for me.

    Being restricted to 4:3 resolutions instead of 16:9 resolutions limits my ability to compare wide lines quickly.

    I recommend adding the wide screen modes available in current video adapters,

    Is it so difficult to implement widescreen display resolutions in the Hyper-V console?

    RDP does it.

    -- Dave

     

    Samstag, 19. November 2011 02:35
  • Same story With Windows 8 'Consumer Preview'.. Makes the intended use of Client Hyper-V pointless for me.

    Montag, 5. März 2012 00:29
  • Several years have passed and Microsoft haven't done anything to correct this problem. I think it's time that we consider if using Hyper-V is really still worth it, when there are other virtual machine products on the market.

    Have anyone tried to use VMWare instead and know if widescreen resolutions are supported on that ?

    Dienstag, 6. März 2012 12:46
  • Has anyone tried with the latest beta release? Still no 1920 x 1080 ?
    Donnerstag, 24. Mai 2012 12:47
  • :) Should take the Host Resolution, for development it's not very good because most of people work with much higher resolutions in a extended screen, My laptop have 1920x1080 snif snif :), let's wait. 

    MVP Office Development, MCP, MCTS SharePoint 2010 Development




    • Bearbeitet Joao Livio Freitag, 31. August 2012 13:49
    Freitag, 31. August 2012 13:46
  • Might as well add myself to this list to receive alerts when/if this is ever addressed.  Let me first say that I love Hyper-V at the server side. Client side presents some challenges, namely what is described in this thread.  If this client side type 2 hypervisor is truly going to compete, Microsoft Win8 Hyper-V team should take a look at VMware Workstation 9, specifically the autoresize feature for VM-side resolutions. Would love to see this addressed in order to provide an XP-Mode like solution for backwards compatibility to Win7 during Win8 migrations.  Thanks!

    @youngtech

    Freitag, 14. September 2012 05:21
  • Might as well add myself to this list to receive alerts when/if this is ever addressed.  Let me first say that I love Hyper-V at the server side. Client side presents some challenges, namely what is described in this thread.  If this client side type 2 hypervisor is truly going to compete, Microsoft Win8 Hyper-V team should take a look at VMware Workstation 9, specifically the autoresize feature for VM-side resolutions. Would love to see this addressed in order to provide an XP-Mode like solution for backwards compatibility to Win7 during Win8 migrations.  Thanks!

    @youngtech

    Hah, don't hold your breath. If I had, I'd be dead for more than two years. This is not deemed worthy of their time, probably because those in charge of Hyper-V are being lead by marketing bullies who says "This is not an USP! Who cares!". And you know what giving too much power to Marketing does to any product based company.

    To Mr.Andersen: Im on VMWare Workstation 8 because of that particular issue. It means THAT much to me, yes, so I pay money to make the problem go away. Any resolution I want is supported on the host machien when using it locally as well as remotely. So If you cannot live with Hyper-Vs abysmal host resolution support, pay up and go with the alternative.


    • Bearbeitet sBirch Freitag, 14. September 2012 08:32 addressing mr.andersen's question
    Freitag, 14. September 2012 08:30
  • I Found a solution using http://remotedesktopmanager.com/, working now with 1920x1080 Extended

    MVP Office Development, MCP, MCTS SharePoint 2010 Development

    Freitag, 14. September 2012 09:00
  • I Found a solution using http://remotedesktopmanager.com/, working now with 1920x1080 Extended

    MVP Office Development, MCP, MCTS SharePoint 2010 Development

    Hm, this is called Remote Desktop Manager - so it still requires you to RDP? Or not? I believe that Hyper-V always supported higher resolutions if you RDP'ed. This software allows you to use the Hyper Visor to directly interact with the virtual machine from the host system in any resolution you like WITHOUT using RDP client or RDP protocols?

    Which version do you use for this? The Enterprise or the Standard edition? I couldn't find the price for the Standard Edition, might be it is free, but it didn't seem to support Hyper-V. The Enterprise version was about 70$!


    • Bearbeitet sBirch Freitag, 14. September 2012 09:08
    Freitag, 14. September 2012 09:04
  • Standard, it's free, just configure your options, in my case open RDP in secondary monitor as Full Screen, assume 1920x1080

    MVP Office Development, MCP, MCTS SharePoint 2010 Development

    Freitag, 14. September 2012 09:10
  • Hm, I worry that you still use "RDP" since the whole point of the thread was that the NATIVE interface wasn't working, RDP always worked fine. I can't see or understand if this software interfaces directly with the HyperV or still goes through RDP (and if it does, I've gone nowhere).

    Thanks for the tip. I guess I have to test, but I can't test it now as my setup runs VMWare and I dare not mess with it by enabling HyperV now. I have a Windows 8 box at home, I might try there to see for myself :)

    Still, MS, why not just Do It Properly instead of Half-Arsedly? Half-Arsedly is so old MS style.

    Freitag, 14. September 2012 09:44
  • Hm, I worry that you still use "RDP" since the whole point of the thread was that the NATIVE interface wasn't working, RDP always worked fine. I can't see or understand if this software interfaces directly with the HyperV or still goes through RDP (and if it does, I've gone nowhere).

    Thanks for the tip. I guess I have to test, but I can't test it now as my setup runs VMWare and I dare not mess with it by enabling HyperV now. I have a Windows 8 box at home, I might try there to see for myself :)

    Still, MS, why not just Do It Properly instead of Half-Arsedly? Half-Arsedly is so old MS style.

    I assume Joao Livio is not a native English speaker, otherwise they would  have read the rest of this thread and realised that RDP is not a solution for a number of us. I am having to study for the 70-659 exam and this limitation is making it quite frustrating, as my system has a 1280 x 800 display - it I could set 1280 x 720 as the resolution in the guest VM I would be able to make much better use of my display, as 1024 x 768 covers the task bar.

    Perhaps one day we will be liberated from these draconian, punitive measures.

    Dienstag, 6. November 2012 20:12
  • Add me to the list... why not have a "Full screen" option at least... look at Parallels on the Mac... for crying out loud you can dynamically size your desktop on the fly!  MS you really need to address this... maybe steal someone else's ideas?  Try to keep up with your competition... :)
    Mittwoch, 14. November 2012 19:48
  • Disappointing indeed.  With Client-Hyper-V being available on every windows 8 pro, I was thinking about switching to client-Hyper-V instead of using (and paying for) VMWare Workstation.

    But this screen resolution issue is forcing me to keep using VMWare.  RDP is not the solution, it's a workaround.

    (Hey MS : the 90ies called, they want their 4:3 display resolutions back :p )


    • Bearbeitet Kristof Vandervorst Mittwoch, 2. Januar 2013 08:08
    • Als Antwort vorgeschlagen TNator Donnerstag, 21. Februar 2013 11:35
    Mittwoch, 2. Januar 2013 08:07
  • Mikey Cooper said:
     but this is a bit of a hindrance for me.  Not being able to pick a widescreen resolution like 1280x720 or my host's native 1400x900 to run in fullscreen is kind of disappointing.

    I completely agree with you. I just can't understand why they can't offer more resolutions and colors. It's not like these resolutions just came out yesterday. Seems like remote desktop is going to be their "workaround".

    Completely agree with both of you. I am really disappointed that widescreen resolutions aren't at least updated in the VMbus driver. This is ridiculous. Microsoft, get your finger out.
    Donnerstag, 21. Februar 2013 11:24
  • <blockquote><p>Several years have passed and Microsoft haven't done anything to correct this problem. I think it's time that we consider if using Hyper-V is really still worth it, when there are other virtual machine products on the market.</p><p>Have anyone tried to use VMWare instead and know if widescreen resolutions are supported on that ?</p></blockquote><br /> VMware supports wide-screen resolutions once the tools-addin is installed. However, performance on VMwares is not so great.

    Donnerstag, 21. Februar 2013 11:33
  • So, basically, the answer and solution to the problem is VMware. Microsoft: 0. VMware 1.
    Donnerstag, 21. Februar 2013 11:40
  • What I dont understand is this:

    On a Windows Server 2012 Hyper-V environment I installed a Windows 7 client -and get only the mentioned screen resolutions. Beside that, I installed a Windows Server 2012 "client" and there I get ALL resolutions my screen supports. The device manager in W7 client says "Microsoft Virtual Machine Bus Video Device", while the 2012 client have a "Microsoft Hyper-V Video" device ...

    C'mon MS: Solve that issue!

    Christian 

    Mittwoch, 20. März 2013 20:39
  • If you create a virtual WIN8 machine in WIN8 using Hyper-V, can you get the "Microsoft Hyper-V Video" driver as an option?  It was my understanding that the Hyper-V code in Server 2012 and WIN8 is the same.

    Robert Brandenburg

    Freitag, 29. März 2013 16:48
  • So, basically, the answer and solution to the problem is VMware. Microsoft: 0. VMware 1.

    I can only agree to this. As long as Microsoft refuses to listen to what it's customers want, picking another product is the best solution.

    I can only recommend using VmWare instead of Hyper-V. VmWare is working flawlessly and doesn't have the resolution limitations imposed by Hyper-V.

    The Hyper-V display resolution problem has existed for many years now and it's obvious that Microsoft have no intention of correcting it. Until Hyper-V starts supporting the same resolutions as the flatpanel monitors that everybody use, it's simply not mature enough to be a serious alternative to VmWare.


    Donnerstag, 27. Juni 2013 05:25
  • Is there any way to change the 4MB video limit in regedit?
    Donnerstag, 4. Juli 2013 17:03
  • +1 to another that wants higher res
    Mittwoch, 11. September 2013 21:04
  • This now can be done easily with Hyper-V 4.0 in Server 2012 R2 and Windows 8.1!

    The parameter in Hyper-V is "Enhanced Session Mode".  You get all the support of an RDP connection, without the networking requirements.  You set the policy on the Hyper-V Server and the option to use Enhanced Session mode in the VM settings.  You can then copy/paste files directly from host to VM, use sound and USB redirection and size your VM window to the aspect ratio and resolution of your physical monitor.  Cool!

    The caveat:  The guest OS in the VM must be at least Server 2012 R2 or Windows 8.1.


    Mark Wheatley

    Samstag, 26. Oktober 2013 19:25
  • I know that this is heretical in this crowd, but I use a MacBook Pro and Parallels VMs.  None of these issues mentioned in this thread is a problem.  I can scale a VM to be any screen size or resolution that I want.  I can run 8 or more VMs at any one time without any noticeable loss of performance or stalling.  I have installed many different Mostly MS operating systems, and all work well, and much faster than on a real box owing to the fact that I use an SSD to house the VMs. 

    The largest machine I have ever run was initially configured in VMware by another engineer, took 4 processors and half my RAM (8 Gig) but was a (Wonderware) System Platform model of an entire Brewery, bottling, and production facility complete with virtual PLCs and an entire operational MES system operating in Real-Time. No issues on the MacBook or other VMs running concurrently, through it used half my resources.  I have tried VMware and it sucks.  Performance and stalling are major concerns.  I only tried recently Hyper-V (on my Win 8 Notebook)because our Director of Engineering wanted to store a VM of a model machine so others could access it.  I was not impressed.

    So I fiddled, and screwed and fiddled and screwed around and FINALLY got the network adapter to work (but I had to install a legacy).  According to a previous post, somehow MS got the idea through their thick heads that "Oh Yeah!" I guess that Copy-and-Paste and other such functionality that other VM Companies have had for the past 5 years should be added.  Then I ran into this resolution and aspect ration problem and I NEED THE MACHINE FOR A TRADE SHOW DEMO!  I have never been impressed with MS, not since NT 3.0, and all the issues with every single OS since then.  While the Mac quality may have suffered since S. Jobs passed, it is still better than ANY single Windows machine I can find, simply because I can have lots of them running on my MacBook at any one time.

    LISTEN AND LEARN MS! Wake up and smell the coffee.

    Donnerstag, 31. Oktober 2013 16:25
  • More than 5 years later and this issue apparently still doesn't warrant a resolution. Having better resolution support in the VM Console may not high priority for enterprise use, but many end-users are requesting it. 

    It's just embarrassing that the Windows Phone emulator has to scale the display because it can't support the resolutions of the latest windows phones.

    * update*

    Windows 8 and Server 2012 support more resolutions (up to native full screen), as well as audio and USB device redirection,  as long as you create a gen 2 vm see - http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dn282274.aspx

    If you using anything older than those OSs your out-of-luck. Linux support may arrive in the future...
    Samstag, 9. November 2013 13:31
  • The video resolution issue is killing me. Here is my setup:

    Host: Windows 8
    Virtual Machine: Windows 8.1

    I wanted to create a development environment for web application development. In doing so, one of the common tools I need is Photoshop. Unfortunately, when using RDP to login to my virtual machine, the video quality is atrocious. This makes it extremely difficult, if not down right impossible to use this for any kind of UI work.

    I have a similar setup at my house with the following setup:

    Host: Windows 7
    Virtual Machine: Windows 8

    The only difference is, I am using VirtualBox which allows me to use my graphics card. Is Microsoft going to address this issue?

    Montag, 6. Januar 2014 18:51
  • Poor video performance with VirtualBox is not something for Microsoft to fix.  That's related to VirtualBox.

    Have you contacted their support?

    Montag, 6. Januar 2014 19:52
  • I don't have the issue with VirtualBox, only Hyper-V. Hyper-V uses a virtual graphics card which produces crappy quality. VirtualBox utilizes the physical video card on your machine, and therefore works better.
    Montag, 6. Januar 2014 21:38
  • I remember over 20 years ago when I first started an emulator on my Amiga 1200, it was a windows emulator, cant remember the name but even that had better resolution support..

    We are about to scrap our old VMware cluster and replace it with a Hyper-V one, lack of resolutions is really going to create an issue for us, perhaps we made a mistake by choosing Hyper-V...

    Freitag, 24. Januar 2014 11:04
  • I have wide screen working without RDP in this scenerio.

    My "Server" is running Hyper-V Server 2012.  I am using the built in hyper-v MSC console on Windows 8.1 to control the server.  The virtual client hosted on the 2012 server is Windows 8.1 as well.  In this case, I can double click the VM in the hyper-v console and get any resolution I want, including 1920X1080 without using RDP.  

    I would like to point out that if the virtual machine is Windows 7, it still uses an old driver that does not support wide screen resolutions.  This should work on 2012 sp1 VM's as well as WIndows 8.1.  I'm not sure about 8.0.  I'm not sure if this holds true for sales folks who have to run Hyper-V as a service on the local machine they are presenting from rather than a dedicated server box.  

    It looks like the automatic driver download for Windows 7 "Microsoft Virtual Machine Virtual Bus Video Device" is the component that needs updating to support Wide screen on Windows 7.   MS says that this driver is optimized for performance with this environment and should not be swapped out.  But I'd be willing to try a third party one to fix this problem.  

    Montag, 27. Januar 2014 19:47
  • This is a serious issue for me also.  I am using Hyper-V on a surface pro 2 to run win 7 so I can VPN into my company.  Using a remote connection does not work because when you start the VPN up, it blocks all network traffic - including the remote connection.  Thus, you must use the Hyper-V console.  Since I have to run a Windows 7 client, I can not set up a gen-2 Hyper-V.

    This is another example of what I believe very bright but limited experienced engineers developing products.  AS YOUR CUSTOMER I NEED HIGHER RESOLUTION VIDEO IN THE HYPER-V CONSOLES - INCLUDING WINDOWS 7 GUESTS OPERATING SYSTEMS.  

    This really should not be a big deal, but the fact that this thread has been going on for so many years is very disconcerting.  Microsoft - do you read these forums?

    I am trying to dump VMware and go with HYPER-V but you are making it really, really tough.

    Donnerstag, 30. Januar 2014 07:12
  • My company wants to drop VMWare too, but exactly this "Feature" is preventing it.

    We use virtualization for either VPN connections and test- and development. VPN is a no go with Hyper-V since you can honestly not force People to use a low display resolution if their monitor supports full hd or greater.

    You could get around for test- and development using RDP but you can not for VPN connections. As it is, we prefer spending more money on VMWare for this purpose.

    Please add display drivers that support higher resolutions and maybe even hardware acceleration.
    Donnerstag, 27. Februar 2014 12:48