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Replace Win2k3 Domain Controller to Win2k8

    Question

  • Hi There..

    I have an ailing -windows 2003 server that i want to replace with windows 2008.

    The Windows 2003 server is the Operations Master & god like machine within the network. I have another 5 branch domain controller's, ranging from Win2k through to Win2k8 servers.

    Now, I want to build my new machine up as a Win2k8 controller, rename it to the existing DC's name, and seize all roles from it.

    Can anyone advise on the processes to succesfully implement the change?

    I know within win2k3 how to seize roles etc, but the name change, (with the existing DC being active) troubles me.

    Many Thanks
    Pete
    Tuesday, June 30, 2009 1:18 PM

Answers

  • Hello Pete,

           The best way is to perform a transition.

    Before performing the steps below please take the system stae backups, DHCP database backups and all the other services running on the server.

    Please see the following link for Transition.

    http://blogs.dirteam.com/blogs/sanderberkouwer/archive/2008/03/02/transitioning-your-active-directory-to-windows-server-2008.aspx



    Now, I want to build my new machine up as a Win2k8 controller, rename it to the existing DC's name, ??

    In the above line you have mentioned that you would like to have the same name for the DC, may i know the any specific reason you would like to so that and Also do you have exchange server in your infrastructure ?


    Thanks

    http://technetfaqs.wordpress.com
    Tuesday, June 30, 2009 2:02 PM
  • hi ther,e

    here are some more info on migrating from windows 2003 to windows 2008

    some info based on migration from windwos 2003 to windows 2008

    In-place upgrading
    Windows Server 2003 and Windows Server 2003 R2 can both be upgraded in-place to Windows Server 2008, as long as you keep the following in mind: 

    • The Windows Server 2003 patchlevel should be at least Service Pack 1
    • You can't upgrade across architectures (x86, x64 & Itanium)
    • Standard Edition can be upgraded to both Standard and Enterprise Edition
    • Enterprise Edition can be upgraded to Enterprise Edition only
    • Datacenter Edition can be upgraded to Datacenter Edition only

    This might be your preferred option when:

    • Your Active Directory Domain Controllers can still last three to five years (economically and technically)
    • You worked hard to get your Active Directory in the shape it's in.
    • Your servers are in tip-top shape. 

    Transitioning
    Migrating this way means adding Windows Server 2008 Domain Controllers to your existing Active Directory environment. After successfully moving the Flexible Single Master Operations (FSMO) roles you can simply demote the previous Domain Controllers, remove them from the domain and throw them out of the window. Transitioning is possible for Active Directory environments which domain functional level is at least Windows 2000 Native.

     

    I feel transitioning is the middle road between the two other ways to migrate to Windows Server 2008:

    • Restructuring means filling a new Active Directory from scratch
    • In-place upgrading means you're stuck with the same hardware and limited to certain upgrade paths
    • Transitioning means you get to keep your current Active Directory lay-out, contents, group policies and schema. Transitioning also means moving to new machines, which can be dimensioned to last another three to five years without trouble.

    Transitioning is good when:

    • You worked hard to get your Active Directory in the shape it's in.
    • Your servers are faced with aging.
    • In-place upgrading leaves you with an undesired outcome (for instance 32bit DC's)
    • You need a chance to place your Active Directory files on different partitions/volumes.

    When done right your colleagues might not even suspect a thing! The downside is you need to know exactly what you're doing, because things can go wrong pretty fast. that's why I wrote this useful piece of information
      

    Restructuring
    A third way to go from Windows Server 2003 Domain Controllers to Windows Server 2008 Domain Controllers is restructuring your Active Directory environment. This involves moving all your resources from one (Windows Server 2003) domain to a new and fresh (Windows Server 2008) domain. Tools like the Active Directory Migration Tool (ADMT) are priceless in these kind of migrations.

     

    Restructuring is good when:

    • Your current Active Directory environment is a mess or is uncontrolable
    • You want to build a new Active Directory environment and import (pieces of) your existing Active Directory environment.
    • You need to merge (information from)(domains from) two Active Directory forests together
    • You need to split (information from)(domains from) two Active Directory forest




      =================================================================



      After installation, join the new machine to the existing domain as a member server. This procedure is exactly the same as joining a workstation to the domain.

      Since you are upgrading the Operating System on the new Domain Controller, you will need to add some values to the existing Active Directory schema, in order for the new server to become a Domain Controller. Windows Server 2008 supports more functionality than before, so a schema upgrade for the domain and forest is required to facilitate this and make this new feature set fully functional on the domain. To make the necessary changes, you must be logged on as the built-in Administrator user account, or a user with Domain, Schema and Enterprise Admin privileges.

      Insert the Windows Server 2008 media into your current server . Open a command prompt and browse to sources\adprep folder within the Windows Server 2008 DVD media. Execute the command adprep /forestprep.

      Next, execute adprep /domainprep . You must be logged on as a Domain Admin user for these steps to work correctly. Once these commands have run your Active Directory schema will have been extended to support Windows Server 2008 as a Domain Controller.

      Promote the new server as a Domain Controller for the domain. Enter dcpromo at a command prompt and follow the wizard. When prompted, select the option for an additional domain controller in an existing domain. After the wizard completes, the new server will be acting as a Domain Controller for your domain. It is necessary at this point to restart the server for these changes to be applied.

      In a single-domain Active Directory forest, all servers should also be Global Catalog servers. The Global Catalog is a required component of Active Directory which is used during logins to establish universal group membership for a user account. To promote the new server as a Global Catalog, open Active Directory Sites and Services from the Administrative Tools container within Control Panel or on the Start Menu. Double-click Sites, then Servers, followed by the name of the new server. Next, right-click "NTDS Settings" and select Properties. On the General tab, check the Global Catalog checkbox. Restart the new Domain Controller for changes to take effect.

      Since you intend on removing the old Domain Controller from the domain, you need to transfer all the Operations (FSMO) roles to the new Domain Controller.

      The current FSMO role configuration for your network can be found by running the command "netdom query fsmo" at a command prompt on a Domain Controller.

      To transfer these FSMO roles to the new domain controller, follow the information detailed in the following Microsoft Support article: http://support.microsoft.com/kb/324801. Please ensure any other information you follow is information regarding the TRANSFER of FSMO roles. Seizing FSMO roles is an emergency operation which should not be performed during this procedure.

      DNS is a critical component of your Active Directory network. The easiest way to install the DNS role onto the new server is to follow the instructions outlined at http://technet2.microsoft.com/WindowsServer2008/en/library/3cf4d1b1-7a6e-4438-bf4f-22d9468c17321033.mspx You should be already using Active Directory-integrated DNS zones, which is the easiest method of allowing DNS replication to occur - DNS information is stored in Active Directory and replicates with Domain Controller replication traffic. To check if your DNS zones are AD-integrated (and convert them if not), please follow http://support.microsoft.com/kb/227844.

      You probably want to enable DNS forwarding in the DNS console on the server, too. This forwards lookups for external domains to a DNS server at your ISP, which allows the server to effectively resolve DNS for external domains. More information on forwarders can be found at http://technet2.microsoft.com/WindowsServer/en/Library/ee992253-235e-4fd4-b4da-7e57e70ad3821033.mspx.

      To move DHCP to the new server, you will need to first install the role. To install the role in Windows Server 2008, check the DHCP Server role option within the Add Roles wizard in the Server Manager. To correctly configure DHCP after the role is installed on your new server, you will need to ensure you configure it to distribute IP addresses which are in a different range to the IP scope defined on the other DHCP server. You should also ensure the correct DNS and WINS servers are entered into the scope options. Remember that the only DNS servers which should be configured on workstations are the Domain Controllers which are also acting as DNS servers - no ISP DNS server should ever be set through DHCP.

      Once all of these steps have been completed, you should have successfully transferred all of the Active Directory roles to the new domain controller. At this stage, I would suggest you shut down the old domain controller and check to ensure all services on workstations and servers are working correctly - including logins. If they are, you should be safe to switch the old DC back on, run dcpromo and demote it from its Domain Controller role. This will remove the DC as a Domain Controller, leaving it as a member server on the network.

      To completely remove the DC from the network, you will need to remember that any other data - including folder redirection folders and user profiles - should be replicated or otherwise transferred to either the new server or another location on the network. ROBOCOPY can be used to do this, and it can copy the NTFS ACLs with the files which is a bonus as much as a requirement in most cases.

      Once the old DC is fully removed through dcpromo and then disconnected, the new DC can have its name and/or IP address changed to that of the old one.


    sainath !analyze
    Tuesday, June 30, 2009 6:10 PM

All replies

  • Hello Pete,

           The best way is to perform a transition.

    Before performing the steps below please take the system stae backups, DHCP database backups and all the other services running on the server.

    Please see the following link for Transition.

    http://blogs.dirteam.com/blogs/sanderberkouwer/archive/2008/03/02/transitioning-your-active-directory-to-windows-server-2008.aspx



    Now, I want to build my new machine up as a Win2k8 controller, rename it to the existing DC's name, ??

    In the above line you have mentioned that you would like to have the same name for the DC, may i know the any specific reason you would like to so that and Also do you have exchange server in your infrastructure ?


    Thanks

    http://technetfaqs.wordpress.com
    Tuesday, June 30, 2009 2:02 PM
  • Great - thank you
    I have one Win2k8 machine that has replaced one of my Win2k3 machines in a branch office, would it be just as easy to seize the roles to this machine, then build my primary replacement?

    P
    Tuesday, June 30, 2009 3:35 PM
  • hi ther,e

    here are some more info on migrating from windows 2003 to windows 2008

    some info based on migration from windwos 2003 to windows 2008

    In-place upgrading
    Windows Server 2003 and Windows Server 2003 R2 can both be upgraded in-place to Windows Server 2008, as long as you keep the following in mind: 

    • The Windows Server 2003 patchlevel should be at least Service Pack 1
    • You can't upgrade across architectures (x86, x64 & Itanium)
    • Standard Edition can be upgraded to both Standard and Enterprise Edition
    • Enterprise Edition can be upgraded to Enterprise Edition only
    • Datacenter Edition can be upgraded to Datacenter Edition only

    This might be your preferred option when:

    • Your Active Directory Domain Controllers can still last three to five years (economically and technically)
    • You worked hard to get your Active Directory in the shape it's in.
    • Your servers are in tip-top shape. 

    Transitioning
    Migrating this way means adding Windows Server 2008 Domain Controllers to your existing Active Directory environment. After successfully moving the Flexible Single Master Operations (FSMO) roles you can simply demote the previous Domain Controllers, remove them from the domain and throw them out of the window. Transitioning is possible for Active Directory environments which domain functional level is at least Windows 2000 Native.

     

    I feel transitioning is the middle road between the two other ways to migrate to Windows Server 2008:

    • Restructuring means filling a new Active Directory from scratch
    • In-place upgrading means you're stuck with the same hardware and limited to certain upgrade paths
    • Transitioning means you get to keep your current Active Directory lay-out, contents, group policies and schema. Transitioning also means moving to new machines, which can be dimensioned to last another three to five years without trouble.

    Transitioning is good when:

    • You worked hard to get your Active Directory in the shape it's in.
    • Your servers are faced with aging.
    • In-place upgrading leaves you with an undesired outcome (for instance 32bit DC's)
    • You need a chance to place your Active Directory files on different partitions/volumes.

    When done right your colleagues might not even suspect a thing! The downside is you need to know exactly what you're doing, because things can go wrong pretty fast. that's why I wrote this useful piece of information
      

    Restructuring
    A third way to go from Windows Server 2003 Domain Controllers to Windows Server 2008 Domain Controllers is restructuring your Active Directory environment. This involves moving all your resources from one (Windows Server 2003) domain to a new and fresh (Windows Server 2008) domain. Tools like the Active Directory Migration Tool (ADMT) are priceless in these kind of migrations.

     

    Restructuring is good when:

    • Your current Active Directory environment is a mess or is uncontrolable
    • You want to build a new Active Directory environment and import (pieces of) your existing Active Directory environment.
    • You need to merge (information from)(domains from) two Active Directory forests together
    • You need to split (information from)(domains from) two Active Directory forest




      =================================================================



      After installation, join the new machine to the existing domain as a member server. This procedure is exactly the same as joining a workstation to the domain.

      Since you are upgrading the Operating System on the new Domain Controller, you will need to add some values to the existing Active Directory schema, in order for the new server to become a Domain Controller. Windows Server 2008 supports more functionality than before, so a schema upgrade for the domain and forest is required to facilitate this and make this new feature set fully functional on the domain. To make the necessary changes, you must be logged on as the built-in Administrator user account, or a user with Domain, Schema and Enterprise Admin privileges.

      Insert the Windows Server 2008 media into your current server . Open a command prompt and browse to sources\adprep folder within the Windows Server 2008 DVD media. Execute the command adprep /forestprep.

      Next, execute adprep /domainprep . You must be logged on as a Domain Admin user for these steps to work correctly. Once these commands have run your Active Directory schema will have been extended to support Windows Server 2008 as a Domain Controller.

      Promote the new server as a Domain Controller for the domain. Enter dcpromo at a command prompt and follow the wizard. When prompted, select the option for an additional domain controller in an existing domain. After the wizard completes, the new server will be acting as a Domain Controller for your domain. It is necessary at this point to restart the server for these changes to be applied.

      In a single-domain Active Directory forest, all servers should also be Global Catalog servers. The Global Catalog is a required component of Active Directory which is used during logins to establish universal group membership for a user account. To promote the new server as a Global Catalog, open Active Directory Sites and Services from the Administrative Tools container within Control Panel or on the Start Menu. Double-click Sites, then Servers, followed by the name of the new server. Next, right-click "NTDS Settings" and select Properties. On the General tab, check the Global Catalog checkbox. Restart the new Domain Controller for changes to take effect.

      Since you intend on removing the old Domain Controller from the domain, you need to transfer all the Operations (FSMO) roles to the new Domain Controller.

      The current FSMO role configuration for your network can be found by running the command "netdom query fsmo" at a command prompt on a Domain Controller.

      To transfer these FSMO roles to the new domain controller, follow the information detailed in the following Microsoft Support article: http://support.microsoft.com/kb/324801. Please ensure any other information you follow is information regarding the TRANSFER of FSMO roles. Seizing FSMO roles is an emergency operation which should not be performed during this procedure.

      DNS is a critical component of your Active Directory network. The easiest way to install the DNS role onto the new server is to follow the instructions outlined at http://technet2.microsoft.com/WindowsServer2008/en/library/3cf4d1b1-7a6e-4438-bf4f-22d9468c17321033.mspx You should be already using Active Directory-integrated DNS zones, which is the easiest method of allowing DNS replication to occur - DNS information is stored in Active Directory and replicates with Domain Controller replication traffic. To check if your DNS zones are AD-integrated (and convert them if not), please follow http://support.microsoft.com/kb/227844.

      You probably want to enable DNS forwarding in the DNS console on the server, too. This forwards lookups for external domains to a DNS server at your ISP, which allows the server to effectively resolve DNS for external domains. More information on forwarders can be found at http://technet2.microsoft.com/WindowsServer/en/Library/ee992253-235e-4fd4-b4da-7e57e70ad3821033.mspx.

      To move DHCP to the new server, you will need to first install the role. To install the role in Windows Server 2008, check the DHCP Server role option within the Add Roles wizard in the Server Manager. To correctly configure DHCP after the role is installed on your new server, you will need to ensure you configure it to distribute IP addresses which are in a different range to the IP scope defined on the other DHCP server. You should also ensure the correct DNS and WINS servers are entered into the scope options. Remember that the only DNS servers which should be configured on workstations are the Domain Controllers which are also acting as DNS servers - no ISP DNS server should ever be set through DHCP.

      Once all of these steps have been completed, you should have successfully transferred all of the Active Directory roles to the new domain controller. At this stage, I would suggest you shut down the old domain controller and check to ensure all services on workstations and servers are working correctly - including logins. If they are, you should be safe to switch the old DC back on, run dcpromo and demote it from its Domain Controller role. This will remove the DC as a Domain Controller, leaving it as a member server on the network.

      To completely remove the DC from the network, you will need to remember that any other data - including folder redirection folders and user profiles - should be replicated or otherwise transferred to either the new server or another location on the network. ROBOCOPY can be used to do this, and it can copy the NTFS ACLs with the files which is a bonus as much as a requirement in most cases.

      Once the old DC is fully removed through dcpromo and then disconnected, the new DC can have its name and/or IP address changed to that of the old one.


    sainath !analyze
    Tuesday, June 30, 2009 6:10 PM