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Quick conversion - Dynamic VHD to Fixed

    Question

  • Is there a way to quickly convert a dynamic VHD to fixed without having to wait hours. I need to convert a 600GB and expand it to 1TB.

     


    Regards, Boon Tee - PowerBiz Solutions, Australia - www.powerbiz.net.au
    • Changed type Boon TeeMVP Saturday, January 08, 2011 12:28 AM Mistaken thread type selection - by default, it was set to comment
    Friday, January 07, 2011 11:02 PM

Answers

  • You can convert a dynamic VHD to a static VHD using the Edit Disk action in Hyper-V Manager. You'll have the option to convert the VHD to static and you can specify a new VHD name and location to hold the static VHD. During the conversion process, all content is copied from the dynamic VHD into the new static VHD. Once conversion is complete, you update the VM to use the static VHD instead of the dynamic VHD. Once you've powered on the VM and confirmed that all data has been maintained, you can delete the dynamic VHD—It's not automatically deleted.

    The amount of time it takes to convert will depend on the size of the dynamic VHD, the size of the static VHD being created, the IOPS of the disk subsystem, if you're creating the new static VHD on the same spindles as where the current dynamic VHD resides, and other I/O that's affecting the disk subsystem, such as other VMs. There's no simple answer and you'll need to try a conversion to get a rough estimate of expected conversion times.

    Probably the quickest method is going to be to create a fixed disk and ghost that drive to the other some way, which is still not going to be very fast. but sometime solution like rue Image ISO could save you

    You can check this link

    http://community.spiceworks.com/topic/31250

     


    Mohamed Fawzi | http://fawzi.wordpress.com
    • Marked as answer by Boon TeeMVP Monday, January 10, 2011 10:30 AM
    Sunday, January 09, 2011 10:52 PM
  • Thanks for that. In the end, I tried VHD Resizer (http://vmtoolkit.com/files/folders/converters/entry87.aspx). This tool worked very well for my other smaller VHDs, but it wasn't the fastest. After about 3 hours, it completed the task. However, when I went mounted the VHD to expand the volume, it showed me a RAW volume with no data! So, I created a new partition and formatted the logical drive, and restored the data to this volume. That took another 6 hours.

    I was hoping that there was an easy way to "just pad up the remaining size and expand the VHD". Something like how VHDtool (http://code.msdn.microsoft.com/vhdtool) can create fixed sized VHDs quickly.

    Are there any tools out there that can do this? BTW. This was a data drive, not OS, so I didn't have to worry about the drive not booting afterwards.

     


    Regards, Boon Tee - PowerBiz Solutions, Australia - www.powerbiz.net.au
    • Marked as answer by Boon TeeMVP Monday, January 10, 2011 10:30 AM
    Sunday, January 09, 2011 10:28 PM

All replies

  • you can try using Backup and restore, this would save time since it will be online process ..anyway have you tried

    http://code.msdn.microsoft.com/VHDShellExt

     

    you have to do the basic steps (defrag the VHD, remove unneeded files) before starting the migration

     


    Mohamed Fawzi | http://fawzi.wordpress.com
    Sunday, January 09, 2011 9:24 PM
  • Thanks for that. In the end, I tried VHD Resizer (http://vmtoolkit.com/files/folders/converters/entry87.aspx). This tool worked very well for my other smaller VHDs, but it wasn't the fastest. After about 3 hours, it completed the task. However, when I went mounted the VHD to expand the volume, it showed me a RAW volume with no data! So, I created a new partition and formatted the logical drive, and restored the data to this volume. That took another 6 hours.

    I was hoping that there was an easy way to "just pad up the remaining size and expand the VHD". Something like how VHDtool (http://code.msdn.microsoft.com/vhdtool) can create fixed sized VHDs quickly.

    Are there any tools out there that can do this? BTW. This was a data drive, not OS, so I didn't have to worry about the drive not booting afterwards.

     


    Regards, Boon Tee - PowerBiz Solutions, Australia - www.powerbiz.net.au
    • Marked as answer by Boon TeeMVP Monday, January 10, 2011 10:30 AM
    Sunday, January 09, 2011 10:28 PM
  • You can convert a dynamic VHD to a static VHD using the Edit Disk action in Hyper-V Manager. You'll have the option to convert the VHD to static and you can specify a new VHD name and location to hold the static VHD. During the conversion process, all content is copied from the dynamic VHD into the new static VHD. Once conversion is complete, you update the VM to use the static VHD instead of the dynamic VHD. Once you've powered on the VM and confirmed that all data has been maintained, you can delete the dynamic VHD—It's not automatically deleted.

    The amount of time it takes to convert will depend on the size of the dynamic VHD, the size of the static VHD being created, the IOPS of the disk subsystem, if you're creating the new static VHD on the same spindles as where the current dynamic VHD resides, and other I/O that's affecting the disk subsystem, such as other VMs. There's no simple answer and you'll need to try a conversion to get a rough estimate of expected conversion times.

    Probably the quickest method is going to be to create a fixed disk and ghost that drive to the other some way, which is still not going to be very fast. but sometime solution like rue Image ISO could save you

    You can check this link

    http://community.spiceworks.com/topic/31250

     


    Mohamed Fawzi | http://fawzi.wordpress.com
    • Marked as answer by Boon TeeMVP Monday, January 10, 2011 10:30 AM
    Sunday, January 09, 2011 10:52 PM
  • Thanks, I will try this method as well. I suspect there is not going to be much more speed improvements than what I already have.

     


    Regards, Boon Tee - PowerBiz Solutions, Australia - www.powerbiz.net.au
    Monday, January 10, 2011 10:31 AM