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Prefer IPv4 over IPv6

Answers

  • Please, tell me, WHY man, who create IPv6 began use this fe80::6c02:573b:178c:dd8f naming.

    Blame that on the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) standards committee that came up with this naming convention back in 1998 (http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc2460).  <grin> 

    Not sure what you mean by "reliable source with describe 'native IPv6 for 8\12'".  Microsoft has lots of documentation on IPv6 - I think the majority of it came out with Windows Server 2008 because that was the first release with the dual-stack as a default.  IpV6 was available for Windows Server 2003, but it was an add-on.  Go to Barnesandnoble.com or amazon.com to find a good reference book on IPv6 if you want to learn more - they are not small books.  It is the way the industry is moving because it offers many advantages over IPv4 (which, by the way, has officially run out of addresses which can be handed out).  Microsoft is simply helping customers move into future by providing a dual-stack that can automatically switch back and forth between IPv4 applications and IPv6 applications without the end-user even knowing it goes on.  Some things, like Direct Access, would be almost impossible to implement on IPv4, but becomes (relatively) easy when using IPv6.


    tim


    Tuesday, October 23, 2012 4:18 PM

All replies

  • Rather than address a 'how', let's ask a 'why'.  That is not a 'prefer' option - that is a disable option.  Why do you want to do this?  More and more things are moving to IPv6.  Unless you have really old switches, you should not have any problems with your networking gear.  Windows implements some functions only in IPv6 for capabilities that only communicate to another Windows server where it is known it will have IPv6.  The difference in amount of network traffic between having both IPv4 and IPv6 enabled and only having IPv4 enabled is basically negligible.

    tim

    Thursday, October 18, 2012 6:57 PM
  • So, i do not want disable, i just want replace order, as it possible in 2008 R2. Now, i want know it for my experience, if it is possible.

    Thursday, October 18, 2012 10:18 PM
  • I don't think you can change the order.  (The reference you gave gives instructions on disabling - nothing about reordering.)  I guess you have one on me - I never heard of anyone reordering it in 2008.  Maybe someone else has.


    tim

    Thursday, October 18, 2012 11:29 PM
  • I reorder on Windows 7.

    If you read the article posted, it does refer to "Prefer IPv4 over IPv6"

    I use this option because our remote sites were showing 1 hop from client to server over WAN.
    This had something to do with the ISATAP stuff that Direct Access put in. (Why couldn't they just use real IPV6 on internel network instead of ISATAP?)

    Troubleshooting was a pain when not being able to see the real path of traceroutes and such.

    Prefer IPV4 showed the real path and actually sped things up, since my data was no longer going over VPN, to the DA server and then to real server. With IPV4, it just goes over VPN and to real server.

    Another use is that many WAN accelerators do not support IPV6.  So, preferring IPV4 speeds up your WAN when using these Accelerators.


    Friday, October 19, 2012 3:21 PM
  • I reorder on Windows 7.

    but how it possible for Windows 8\2012 ?
    Friday, October 19, 2012 4:11 PM
  • Hi,

    Thank you for the post.

    As far as I know, Windows 8/2012 platform to offer support for using only IPv6, while keeping support for IPv4 as well. What you want to do is dual-stack networks that devices will be configured with both IPv4 and IPv6 addresses. It shouldn’t matter whether your connection is over IPv4 or IPv6, however Windows prefers native IPv6 connectivity over IPv4 connectivity, if both connection modes are available.

    Regards,


    Nick Gu - MSFT

    Tuesday, October 23, 2012 2:19 AM
  • Why? Please, tell me, WHY man, who create IPv6 began use this fe80::6c02:573b:178c:dd8f naming. WHY not simply extend from 192.168.0.0.0.0/40 ? I can't remeber this fe80::6c02:573b:178c:dd8f......... ((

    Have you reliable source with describe "native IPv6 for 8\12" ?

    Tuesday, October 23, 2012 9:14 AM
  • Please, tell me, WHY man, who create IPv6 began use this fe80::6c02:573b:178c:dd8f naming.

    Blame that on the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) standards committee that came up with this naming convention back in 1998 (http://tools.ietf.org/html/rfc2460).  <grin> 

    Not sure what you mean by "reliable source with describe 'native IPv6 for 8\12'".  Microsoft has lots of documentation on IPv6 - I think the majority of it came out with Windows Server 2008 because that was the first release with the dual-stack as a default.  IpV6 was available for Windows Server 2003, but it was an add-on.  Go to Barnesandnoble.com or amazon.com to find a good reference book on IPv6 if you want to learn more - they are not small books.  It is the way the industry is moving because it offers many advantages over IPv4 (which, by the way, has officially run out of addresses which can be handed out).  Microsoft is simply helping customers move into future by providing a dual-stack that can automatically switch back and forth between IPv4 applications and IPv6 applications without the end-user even knowing it goes on.  Some things, like Direct Access, would be almost impossible to implement on IPv4, but becomes (relatively) easy when using IPv6.


    tim


    Tuesday, October 23, 2012 4:18 PM
  • Tim Cerling is asking the right question.

    The answer to the specific question of how to prefer IPv6 over Ipv4 is documented in MSKB 929852: How to disable IP version 6 or its specific components in Windows by setting disabledcomponents to 0x20

    Wednesday, November 14, 2012 2:52 PM
  • Original poster referred to MSKB 929852 in his question, So I assume he read that.

    His issue is that MSKB 929852 is not valid on Windows 8 , nor Server 2012.

    Wednesday, November 14, 2012 3:28 PM
  • Setting the value to 0x20 causes IPv4 to be preferred over IPv6.
    Tuesday, October 15, 2013 9:09 PM
  • We reorder which protocol is preferred. There are a few websites which fail to support IPv6 in such a way that IPv4 never get's a chance. For these websites we've configured a few computers with the preference order between IPv4 and IPv6 swapped.
    Tuesday, October 15, 2013 9:12 PM
  • (Why couldn't they just use real IPV6 on internel network instead of ISATAP?)

    This is the situation we have as well. Our hardware's site-to-site VPN feature supports IPv4 or IPv6, but not both at the same time. ISATAP is one way to get past this limitation.

    Tuesday, October 15, 2013 9:17 PM
  • Is it possible to have IPv4 preferred over IPv6 in Windows 8/2012 as it is in Windows 7/2012 R2?
    Tuesday, October 15, 2013 9:18 PM
  • Is it possible to have IPv4 preferred over IPv6 in Windows 8/2012 as it is in Windows 7/2012 R2?
    it isn't possible. IPv6 is main TCP\IP protocol.
    Wednesday, October 16, 2013 6:44 AM
  • Actually, I was able to get this working yesterday. Change "HKLM\System\CurrentControlSet\services\Tcpip6\Parameters\DisabledComponents", a DWORD value, to 0x20 and restart the computer.

    • Proposed as answer by fclage Sunday, July 13, 2014 11:49 AM
    Wednesday, October 16, 2013 3:16 PM
  • If you did it, why you ask ?
    Wednesday, October 16, 2013 3:31 PM
  • I asked beforehand.
    Wednesday, October 16, 2013 3:33 PM
  • Actually, I was able to get this working yesterday. Change "HKLM\System\CurrentControlSet\services\Tcpip6\Parameters\DisabledComponents", a DWORD value, to 0x20 and restart the computer.

    Was that tested in 8/2012?  That did not work for us in 2012.  Only 7/2008R2 and before.

    Monday, July 14, 2014 12:02 PM
  • I'm using this setting in a Windows 8.1 computer.
    Monday, July 14, 2014 5:03 PM