none
One physical network adapter lost and virtual network switch

    Question

  • Hi all,

    I have two network adapters and one is for private heartbeat and another one is for public access.  After installing hyperv, I saw another local Area Connection with only "Microsoft Virtual Network Switch Protocol' created.  If I need to create the virtual network switch for  VMs, how many network switch I need to create?  I just tried several virtual network switch settings, now I LOST THE one nework adapter with public access>  hOW DO I get the one with public access back in the networking center without reinstall hyper-V?

    Tuesday, March 09, 2010 3:24 PM

Answers

  • Hyper-V R2 behaves a bit different than v1 - but once Hyper-V is involved only the server revision matters, the behavior is the same (R2 Hyper-V Server behaves like Server 2008 R2 with Hyper-V, and so on.)

    And, your management interface does not move - the behavior that you are seeing is becuase you have a NIC 0 - you called NIC 0 the management interface and you can see that in the Network Connections.
    If you Create an External Virtual Network and associate that with NIC 0 - then NIC 0 becomes the physical extension of teh External Virtual Network (you see that in the protocol bindings).
    Your Host had an interface on NIC 0 and in return is given a new interface on a new virtual nic that is attached to the External Virtual Network that now owns NIC 0 (the management os is not dedicated to this NIC)
    http://itproctology.blogspot.com/2008/04/networking-under-hyper-v-my-network.html

    There are many documents that walk through the basics of clustering Hyper-V.
    http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc732181(WS.10).aspx

    At the minimum you have a management interface that is shared with the clustering interface (they can be separated) - the clustering interface is a NLB interface that is shared by all nodes.

    So, each node has an IP, plus the cluster also has an IP - and the master node responds on the cluster IP.
    Then there is a heartbeat network (this is clustering specific - this doe snto need to be dedicated unless you are scaling to large clusters).

    There is also the Live Migration network - you can guess hwat type of traffic flows over that.

    Then there are host NICs that you hold back specific for External Virtual Networks for VM network traffic (one virtual network can host many VMs).

    I think you would be well served by spending some quality reading time with the Hyper-V and Clustering documentation.  And no, you don't need umpteen NICs as the documents lead you to believe. 
    Dedicate on NIC to the host OS
    Dedicate another NIC to Clustering
    Then you can dedicate a NIC to iSCSI / Storage
    Then you can take your remaning two for VMs.

    (even this might not be necessary, depending on your situation)

    Brian Ehlert (hopefully you have found this useful)
    Tuesday, March 09, 2010 11:22 PM
  • Hi,

     

    Add to Brian’s.

     

    I recommend that you have a read of the following guides about Hyper-V networking first.

     

    Understanding Networking with Hyper-V

    http://blogs.msdn.com/virtual_pc_guy/archive/2008/01/08/understanding-networking-with-hyper-v.aspx

     

    How does basic networking work in Hyper-V?

    http://blogs.technet.com/jhoward/archive/2008/06/16/how-does-basic-networking-work-in-hyper-v.aspx

     

    Configuring Virtual Networks

    http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc816585.aspx

     

    You can also have a read of the following guides about Hyper-V and Failover Cluster.

     

    Step-by-Step Guide for Testing Hyper-V and Failover Clustering

    http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?FamilyId=CD828712-8D1E-45D1-A290-7EDADF1E4E9C&displaylang=en

     

    Deploying Cluster Shared Volumes (CSV) in Windows Server 2008 R2 Failover Clustering

    http://blogs.msdn.com/clustering/archive/2009/02/19/9433146.aspx

     

    http://h20341.www2.hp.com/ERC/downloads/4AA2-2983ENW.pdf

     

    Important Note: This response contains a reference to a third party World Wide Web site. Microsoft is providing this information as a convenience to you. Microsoft does not control these sites and has not tested any software or information found on these sites; therefore, Microsoft cannot make any representations regarding the quality, safety, or suitability of any software or information found there. There are inherent dangers in the use of any software found on the Internet, and Microsoft cautions you to make sure that you completely understand the risk before retrieving any software from the Internet.

     

     

    Best Regards,

    Vincent Hu

     

    Wednesday, March 10, 2010 6:59 AM

All replies

  • Before I remove and install hyper-v, can anyone help me how to get the network adapter with public access back ?  urgent help.
    Tuesday, March 09, 2010 4:09 PM
  • Since you had a new "Network Connection" appear that was only bound to the Virtual Switch Protocol...

    this tells me that when you added the Hyper-V role, you selected the check box to create a default virtual network using a particular physical NIC.

    The best way to get back to square one is to open the Hyper-V manager, then open the Virtual Network Manager and delete all virtual networks (this should reset your networking to the way it looked prior to adding the Hyper-V role).

    From here, just start again - and be sure to be careful in selecting your physical interfaces when you create an External Virtual Network.

    The changes that you notice in "Network Connections" that you describe - are as expected.  And this NIC that had the virtual switch protocol bound to it - you need to not mess with that one.
    In reality - that one is your physical NIC and it is now bound to an External Network - and there is actaully a differnet 'virtual' nic that has been created and given to the management OS for network communication that is sharing the same physcial NIC (through a virtaul network).

    Brian Ehlert (hopefully you have found this useful)
    Tuesday, March 09, 2010 4:15 PM
  • Brian,

    Thanks for your quick reply.

    Sorry.  I did not mention that this is windows 2008 R2 enterprise server.
    I guess that R2 does different way than windows 2008 hyper-V server. Thank you.

    BTW, I am going to configure live migration and CSV.  I do have 5 physical network adapters.  one private nework for LM, one prvate network for clustering, one private network for CSV, one public for managemnet, one public nework for VM; If I configure the VM for public use (external use, our physical netwrok), how many virtual network switches do I need? only one linked to the one adapter which has public IP address? any private network switch?

    Thank you.


     
    Tuesday, March 09, 2010 5:30 PM
  • Hi Brian,

    After removed the netwrok switch, reboot the server and server has assign the public address 10.1.10.2, the network public interface becomes "Microsoft Virtual Network Switch Protocol" only.
    Is thi supposed to be?  Since I have management netork, I have no problem to access the host.
    But, I am assigned 10.1.10.4 for cluster name IP.  since I have no 10.1.10.2 interface shows up, the cluster nework does not include 10.1.10.0/24 network.  What do we recommend for us to assign the cluster name IP?

    Thank you.
    Tuesday, March 09, 2010 7:07 PM
  • Hyper-V R2 behaves a bit different than v1 - but once Hyper-V is involved only the server revision matters, the behavior is the same (R2 Hyper-V Server behaves like Server 2008 R2 with Hyper-V, and so on.)

    And, your management interface does not move - the behavior that you are seeing is becuase you have a NIC 0 - you called NIC 0 the management interface and you can see that in the Network Connections.
    If you Create an External Virtual Network and associate that with NIC 0 - then NIC 0 becomes the physical extension of teh External Virtual Network (you see that in the protocol bindings).
    Your Host had an interface on NIC 0 and in return is given a new interface on a new virtual nic that is attached to the External Virtual Network that now owns NIC 0 (the management os is not dedicated to this NIC)
    http://itproctology.blogspot.com/2008/04/networking-under-hyper-v-my-network.html

    There are many documents that walk through the basics of clustering Hyper-V.
    http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc732181(WS.10).aspx

    At the minimum you have a management interface that is shared with the clustering interface (they can be separated) - the clustering interface is a NLB interface that is shared by all nodes.

    So, each node has an IP, plus the cluster also has an IP - and the master node responds on the cluster IP.
    Then there is a heartbeat network (this is clustering specific - this doe snto need to be dedicated unless you are scaling to large clusters).

    There is also the Live Migration network - you can guess hwat type of traffic flows over that.

    Then there are host NICs that you hold back specific for External Virtual Networks for VM network traffic (one virtual network can host many VMs).

    I think you would be well served by spending some quality reading time with the Hyper-V and Clustering documentation.  And no, you don't need umpteen NICs as the documents lead you to believe. 
    Dedicate on NIC to the host OS
    Dedicate another NIC to Clustering
    Then you can dedicate a NIC to iSCSI / Storage
    Then you can take your remaning two for VMs.

    (even this might not be necessary, depending on your situation)

    Brian Ehlert (hopefully you have found this useful)
    Tuesday, March 09, 2010 11:22 PM
  • Hi,

     

    Add to Brian’s.

     

    I recommend that you have a read of the following guides about Hyper-V networking first.

     

    Understanding Networking with Hyper-V

    http://blogs.msdn.com/virtual_pc_guy/archive/2008/01/08/understanding-networking-with-hyper-v.aspx

     

    How does basic networking work in Hyper-V?

    http://blogs.technet.com/jhoward/archive/2008/06/16/how-does-basic-networking-work-in-hyper-v.aspx

     

    Configuring Virtual Networks

    http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc816585.aspx

     

    You can also have a read of the following guides about Hyper-V and Failover Cluster.

     

    Step-by-Step Guide for Testing Hyper-V and Failover Clustering

    http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?FamilyId=CD828712-8D1E-45D1-A290-7EDADF1E4E9C&displaylang=en

     

    Deploying Cluster Shared Volumes (CSV) in Windows Server 2008 R2 Failover Clustering

    http://blogs.msdn.com/clustering/archive/2009/02/19/9433146.aspx

     

    http://h20341.www2.hp.com/ERC/downloads/4AA2-2983ENW.pdf

     

    Important Note: This response contains a reference to a third party World Wide Web site. Microsoft is providing this information as a convenience to you. Microsoft does not control these sites and has not tested any software or information found on these sites; therefore, Microsoft cannot make any representations regarding the quality, safety, or suitability of any software or information found there. There are inherent dangers in the use of any software found on the Internet, and Microsoft cautions you to make sure that you completely understand the risk before retrieving any software from the Internet.

     

     

    Best Regards,

    Vincent Hu

     

    Wednesday, March 10, 2010 6:59 AM