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windows 7 DNS updates

    Question

  • Hi :

    I am trying to understand how windows 7 will act regarding DNS automatic registration and DNS record refresh , when it take an IP from Win 2008 DHCP with default setting .

    I dont see any clear article about when and how frequent windows 7 will perform updates to its DNS record.

    i.e : if the winodws 7 has static IP , how frequently will it refresh its record.

    i.e : if the windows 7 takes a DHCP lease ( 8 days) , then it will ask the DHCP to refresh its PTR by default , while it will refresh its A record by itself ... so how frequent ?

     

    i.e : what is it with option 81 in DHCP , and updates on windows 7 behavior ?


    ammarhasayen
    Wednesday, December 29, 2010 1:20 PM

Answers

  • Hi,

    Thanks for the post.

    By default, Windows XP and Windows Server 2003 reregister their A and PTR resource records every 24 hours regardless of the computer's role. And I don't see there is any change for this setting in Windows 7.

    To change this time, add the DefaultRegistrationRefreshInterval registry entry under the following registry subkey:

    HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\TcpIp\Parameters

    Note: The interval is set in seconds.

    Thanks,

    Miles


    Please remember to click “Mark as Answer” on the post that helps you, and to click “Unmark as Answer” if a marked post does not actually answer your question. This can be beneficial to other community members reading the thread.
    Thursday, December 30, 2010 9:44 AM
  • That is correct. You can alter that behavior and allow DHCP to update it in lieu of the machine updating it. This will prevent duplicate IP addresses in DNS. For more information on how this all works, and options to configure DHCP for this purpose, as well as configuring scavenging on all DNS zones, please read the following link. I hope you find it helpful.

    DHCP, Dynamic DNS Updates, Scavenging, static entries & timestamps, and the DnsProxyUpdate Group (How to remove and prevent future duplicate DNS host records)
    http://msmvps.com/blogs/acefekay/archive/2009/08/20/dhcp-dynamic-dns-updates-scavenging-static-entries-amp-timestamps-and-the-dnsproxyupdate-group.aspx

    Ace


    Ace Fekay
    MVP, MCT, MCITP EA, MCTS Windows 2008 & Exchange 2007, MCSE & MCSA 2003/2000, MCSA Messaging 2003
    Microsoft Certified Trainer
    Microsoft MVP - Directory Services

    This posting is provided AS-IS with no warranties or guarantees and confers no rights.

    Friday, December 31, 2010 5:44 AM

All replies

  • Hi,

    Thanks for the post.

    By default, Windows XP and Windows Server 2003 reregister their A and PTR resource records every 24 hours regardless of the computer's role. And I don't see there is any change for this setting in Windows 7.

    To change this time, add the DefaultRegistrationRefreshInterval registry entry under the following registry subkey:

    HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\TcpIp\Parameters

    Note: The interval is set in seconds.

    Thanks,

    Miles


    Please remember to click “Mark as Answer” on the post that helps you, and to click “Unmark as Answer” if a marked post does not actually answer your question. This can be beneficial to other community members reading the thread.
    Thursday, December 30, 2010 9:44 AM
  •  So if a windows 7 machine , gets an IP from windows 2008 DHCP with default settings , it will refresh its A record every day ?!


    ammarhasayen
    Thursday, December 30, 2010 7:38 PM
  • That is correct. You can alter that behavior and allow DHCP to update it in lieu of the machine updating it. This will prevent duplicate IP addresses in DNS. For more information on how this all works, and options to configure DHCP for this purpose, as well as configuring scavenging on all DNS zones, please read the following link. I hope you find it helpful.

    DHCP, Dynamic DNS Updates, Scavenging, static entries & timestamps, and the DnsProxyUpdate Group (How to remove and prevent future duplicate DNS host records)
    http://msmvps.com/blogs/acefekay/archive/2009/08/20/dhcp-dynamic-dns-updates-scavenging-static-entries-amp-timestamps-and-the-dnsproxyupdate-group.aspx

    Ace


    Ace Fekay
    MVP, MCT, MCITP EA, MCTS Windows 2008 & Exchange 2007, MCSE & MCSA 2003/2000, MCSA Messaging 2003
    Microsoft Certified Trainer
    Microsoft MVP - Directory Services

    This posting is provided AS-IS with no warranties or guarantees and confers no rights.

    Friday, December 31, 2010 5:44 AM
  • Hi all,

    Did anyone find a solution to this issue.

    When I perform a PING -A on a windows 2003 server against an IP address of a Windows 7 64bit PC, the machine name returned is just the domain portion.

    So for example:

    • If the machines FQDN is PC1.DOMAIN.LOCAL, the PING -A returns just the DOMAIN portion.
    • If I perform the same ping from another windows 7 machine it will return PC1
    • PC2.DOMAIN.LOCAL may be resolve correctly today form a Windows 2003 server, but tomorrow only the DOMAIN may be resolved.

    This effects different machines every day and the forward lookup DNS records are correct, so I doubt it is a DNS issue. 

    Thursday, August 29, 2013 1:15 PM
  • Hi all,

    Did anyone find a solution to this issue.

    When I perform a PING -A on a windows 2003 server against an IP address of a Windows 7 64bit PC, the machine name returned is just the domain portion.

    So for example:

    • If the machines FQDN is PC1.DOMAIN.LOCAL, the PING -A returns just the DOMAIN portion.
    • If I perform the same ping from another windows 7 machine it will return PC1
    • PC2.DOMAIN.LOCAL may be resolve correctly today form a Windows 2003 server, but tomorrow only the DOMAIN may be resolved.

    This effects different machines every day and the forward lookup DNS records are correct, so I doubt it is a DNS issue. 

    A "ping -a" resolved the name for that IP from the PTR in the Reverse zone. So I suggest to look at your reverse zone to make sure there are no duplicate, multiples (which is what it sounds like you have), and/or incorrect PTRs.

    If there are multiples, then it will Round Robin between them, which appears is what's going on. You can test this with NSLOOKUP.

    PING is not the greatest tool to use. Running nslookup, type in the IP, then hit enter. Now hit the arrow UP button on the keyboard to bring up the previous entry, and run it again. Do it again and again. If it shows different results, then that means there are multiple entries in the Reverse zone.


    Ace Fekay
    MVP, MCT, MCITP/EA, MCTS Windows 2008/R2 & Exchange 2007, Exchange 2010 EA, MCSE & MCSA 2003/2000, MCSA Messaging 2003
    Microsoft Certified Trainer
    Microsoft MVP - Directory Services
    Technical Blogs & Videos: http://www.delawarecountycomputerconsulting.com/

    This post is provided AS-IS with no warranties or guarantees and confers no rights.

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    Thursday, August 29, 2013 3:51 PM