none
Why wouldn't ReadyBoost be enabled in Server 2008 R2?

    Question

  • If Windows 7 and Server 2008 R2 are from a common code base, why wouldn't ReadyBoost be enabled in Windows Server 2008 R2? 

    Is it because MS believes we all have our servers are overloaded with memory?  I was able to build my server with 4gb of memory, but now it has 12gb, which is more than it's currently using.  Still, when the server starts paging memory, wouldn't ReadyBoost help performance?


    - Michael Faklis
    Thursday, March 17, 2011 4:10 PM

Answers

  • Hello,

    Readyboost is made for workstations to have a temporary fix for RAM problems. On a server this is not builtin exact for that reason. Use real RAM instead.


    Best regards Meinolf Weber Disclaimer: This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties or guarantees , and confers no rights.
    • Proposed as answer by Mr XMVP Thursday, March 17, 2011 5:52 PM
    • Marked as answer by Tim QuanModerator Monday, March 21, 2011 3:25 AM
    Thursday, March 17, 2011 5:44 PM

All replies

  • Hello,

    Readyboost is made for workstations to have a temporary fix for RAM problems. On a server this is not builtin exact for that reason. Use real RAM instead.


    Best regards Meinolf Weber Disclaimer: This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties or guarantees , and confers no rights.
    • Proposed as answer by Mr XMVP Thursday, March 17, 2011 5:52 PM
    • Marked as answer by Tim QuanModerator Monday, March 21, 2011 3:25 AM
    Thursday, March 17, 2011 5:44 PM
  • Mr x

    Readyboost is NOT an alternative to RAM. The purpose of readyboost is to speed up boot times by storing small OS files in flash memory which has an insignificant seek time being solid state, unlike mechanical hard disks. RAM is faster but as it's volatile you can't boot from it. The swap file is an alternative to RAM but significantly slower.

    Carl Thompson

    Saturday, March 01, 2014 1:19 PM