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File transfer speeds drop by 75% after joining Domain

    Question

  • Hello everyone,

    I installed 2012 Essentials and setup/ran all installation tasks (server backup, client backup, etc).  The server itself runs well.  CPU utilization is typically around 10% and RAM about 40%.  I have a Gigabit ethernet network at home, running through an HP Procurve Switch.  The server has a single Gigabit connection to the switch and is connected at 1GB/s.

    Server Specs:

    Asus P5Q Pro/Q9550(no OC)/4GB RAM/128GB SSD for OS/3Ware9650SE RAID card/onboard Gigabit NIC.

    I had a pre-existing RAID5 array on a HW RAID card that I migrated into the OS.  Drivers are loaded for the RAID card, no issues in Device Mangler.  I shared some folders on the array.  No issues there.

    I joined my W7x64 Ultimate workstation to the Domain. No issues there.

    PROBLEM:  When I transfer files from the server to the workstation via Windows Exlporer I get 10MB/s if I'm lucky.  Previously I was running W2K3 on the server and consistently saw 60MB/s minimum.  There is nothing wrong with the RAID array or card.

    Any ideas what is causing these painfully slow transfer speeds?  Thank you.





    • Edited by mistermiked Thursday, October 25, 2012 4:24 PM Added server HW detail.
    Thursday, October 25, 2012 3:54 PM

Answers

  • Workgroup before?
     
    If so disable SMB signing as it's enabled on a DC and can indeed cause
    file transfer slowdowns.
     
     
    • Marked as answer by mistermiked Friday, October 26, 2012 2:06 AM
    Friday, October 26, 2012 12:22 AM

All replies

  • Not sure if it will help you but try disabling some things on your Network Adapter's Properties:

    Large Send Offload v2 (IPv4) - Disable
    Large Send Offload v2 (IPv6) - Disable

    Thursday, October 25, 2012 5:18 PM
  • Thank you, NewExchangeAdmin.  I will try that when I get home tonight.  To your knowledge, does Server 2012 handle file transfers differently than W2K3?  I'm not a programmer-type so don't know specifics about Kernels and things like that.  The array is formatted NTFS and nothing about it changed b/t running W2K3 as the host OS and running 2012.  Thanks again.
    Thursday, October 25, 2012 5:42 PM
  • My guess is rather that this is a feature which came up with Windows 7 and Server 2008 but might not work as efficiently as intended.

    It's really a shot into the blue but maybe it helps, otherwise running a dedicated NIC all Ends in the Network  usually brings in lower CPU load and thus less power consumption and ontop of it you can see an increase in transfer speed aswell. if everything works well you can get up to 125 MB/s through your network in ideal conditions but I think you get my point.

    Let me know if it worked for you or not.

    Thursday, October 25, 2012 5:53 PM
  • Hmm.  I do have an Intel Pro dual-gigabit PCI-E NIC not doing anything right now...and my switch supports Link Ag.  I'll try your fix first though and report back.  I prefer to keep my boxes at home as mechanically simple as possible.  I'm going to check the NIC settings on the workstation as well.  Possibly Server 2012 changed them when the box got joined to the domain.  Aside from checking that both the server and the workstation were still connected at 1GB/s, I didn't check any other NIC-related settings.
    Thursday, October 25, 2012 6:05 PM
  • I totally forgot that you can team NICs from different vendors on 2012, too. I'd first try the DP adapter at least with 1 connection, then 2 and afterwards if you fancy even with teaming the onboard nic ontop. I agree with you on the simplistic approach but normally with good NIC Adapters you won't have issues in years after plugging them in once. After all your decision, just passing on some thoughts on easy achievable performance improvements.

    Thursday, October 25, 2012 6:12 PM
  • Not sure if it will help you but try disabling some things on your Network Adapter's Properties:

    Large Send Offload v2 (IPv4) - Disable
    Large Send Offload v2 (IPv6) - Disable


    Unfortunately, the on-board NIC does not have these features (for v2).  It does have "TCP Checksum Offload (IPv4)" and "TCP Checksum Offload (IPv6)" though.  Disabling these got me 17MB/s, almost double what I had before but nowhere near what I was getting.  I'm going to load the Intel Pro Dual-port adapter and see what a single connection gets me.
    Thursday, October 25, 2012 10:55 PM
  • Workgroup before?
     
    If so disable SMB signing as it's enabled on a DC and can indeed cause
    file transfer slowdowns.
     
     
    • Marked as answer by mistermiked Friday, October 26, 2012 2:06 AM
    Friday, October 26, 2012 12:22 AM
  • No workgroup.  Just client PCs attached to shares on a W2K3 box.  I will try disabling SMB.
    Friday, October 26, 2012 1:34 AM
  • Madam,  you are a genius.  I know a little bit about GPOs, but would've never in a million years disabled SMB Signing.  I'll admit, I didn't know what it was, so i Googled it and found this guide. It's for Server 2008 but the basic locations apply:  http: //mctexpert.blogspot.com/2011/02/disable-smb-signing.html

    My transfer speeds are outrageous now:  Transferring the 4.01GB .iso of Server 2012 Essentials from server to client (see the irony? :D ) I got 82.1MB/s.   I've never seen my network do more than very low 70MB/s range.  Thank you so much!

    Living in this networking world, I know that nothing is without risk.  So what have I done, essentially?  There is no risk of me downloading anything dangerous from the server, but being that I also changed the CLIENT policy and disabled SMB signing (per the above guide) have I put myself at risk when downloading things from the internet?  Does this affect Certificates at all?  I know it's a lot of questions...thanks again for your help!!!

    I have to wonder what speeds I'd get if installed the Intel Pro 1000 dual NIC I have...but I cannot b/c the motherboard in the server only has two PCI-E slots and they are full. :(


    • Edited by mistermiked Friday, October 26, 2012 2:15 AM
    Friday, October 26, 2012 2:13 AM
  • Another thing:  According to what I've read, SMB Signing has been in place since WinNT. So my W2K3 server definitely had it.  How come it was never a problem before?  I didn't monkey around with GPOs on my home network b/c I didn't need them.
    Friday, October 26, 2012 2:30 AM
  • Well for one thing a server running 2003/member server/workgroup would never enforce smb signing.  Only domain controllers do.  And SBS who has been a DC since 2003 has suffered from file transfer slowdowns since then.

    In a small server, you have little risk to a man in the middle attack that this deflects.  You have more risk that your coworkers and family members are going to beat you over the head waiting for their files to transfer.

    Exceptions to the rule - When you may WANT to turn off SMB message signing - Jesper's Blog - Site Home - TechNet Blogs:
    http://blogs.technet.com/b/jesper_johansson/archive/2005/11/22/414976.aspx

    Friday, October 26, 2012 3:40 AM
  • Thank you for the detailed explanation, Susan.  I learned quite a bit today.

    That article on SMB signing by Jesper Johansson is very informative.  I'm starting to understand the whole SBS thing/concept.

    • Edited by mistermiked Friday, October 26, 2012 1:31 PM
    Friday, October 26, 2012 3:59 AM
  • If you only had TOE only once before that means your onboard nic does not have any internal TOE, when you install your ET Adapter you will definitely see that entry twice, just disable v2 since the first one is actually the NICs own TOE which actually does help with file transfers.
    Friday, October 26, 2012 5:34 AM