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Windows 2008 R2 Paging File Best Practice

    Question

  • HI,

    I have a question about the paging file and recommended best practice to implemented the paging on Windows 2008 R2.

    I have a couple hardware where installed Windows 2008 R2 with Xenapp 6.5 with 16 GB memory on each server.
    On the server I have 300GB 6G SAS 10K with C and D drive. on Raid 1 level.

    What is the best way to create a page file for this server with Xenapp 6.5 Example: C:\??? and D:\??

    I have almost the same setup on Vmware installed with Windows 2008 R2 and Xenapp 6.5 C:\ drive of 40 GB and D:\ drive 40 GB

    And what is the best way for Vmware setup with Xenapp 6.5 with 16 GB memory.

    If I put more memory like 32 GB and what will the best solution.

    Maybe can advice me on this setup or recommended setup with page file.

    Kind regards,
    Hakan91


    Good luck everyone.

    Wednesday, April 04, 2012 6:01 PM

Answers

  • In 2008 I tend to let the OS deal with the paging's file, and both c: and d: are in your local storage so it's the same for me (no iSCSI oin exemple). In 2003 the bestpractice was 2x the memory installed if I remember correctly.

    I use Xenapp and like Milos tell, it's more to know what application you distribute and for how many users. Offline plugin used with Streamed app ? wich use the client memory, etc.. a lot of factor come in play 


    MCP | MCTS 70-236: Exchange Server 2007, Configuring

    Thursday, April 05, 2012 1:00 AM
    Moderator
  • Hi Hakan,

    Please see my recommendation (I follow that personally, be it VMware, Hyper-V VMs or Physical Servers)

    For WS 2003, C drive 40 GB irrespective of OS version and platform. C drive should have 4GB page file.

    For WS 2008/R2, C drive 66 GB irrespective of OS version and platform. C drive should have 6GB page file.

    Aforementioned are basic requirements. 

    As best practice, you need to set page file 1.5 Times the RAM available on any Windows Servers.

    For instance,

    Say, you have 16 GB RAM on a server, 1.5 times the RAM 16 GB = 24 GB;  you need to set 24 GB Page file on the Server. 

    Now, how would you ditribute the page file ?

    Here is the way, You need create a separate Drive and split the Page file (other than the preset page file on C drive)

    For WS 2003, C drive already has 4 GB, now on a newly created drive set 20GB page file (i.e. 24 -4=20 GB), make sure you have at least 25 GB Drive to accomodate 20GB page file.

    For WS 2008/2, C drive already has 6 GB, now on a newly created drive set 18 GB page file (i.e. 24 -6=18 GB), make sure you have at least 23 - 25 GB Drive to accomodate 18GB page file.  

    For more details, you might want to refer following discussion

    Gold Image Build setting question 

    http://social.technet.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/winservergen/thread/e70ec154-916c-427d-b208-79ce4b521be1  


    Thanks


    This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties or guarantees and confers no rights.

    Most of the downtime's are caused because of SysAdmin's curiosity ! - Santosh


    Thursday, April 05, 2012 1:56 AM
    Moderator

All replies

  • You have omitted important aspect, namely the applications that run in server environment. IMHO the best way to find optimum depends on your own research with Performance Monitor. (Do not hesitate to ask in Citrix and VMware forums.)

    Regards

    Milos

    Wednesday, April 04, 2012 6:25 PM
  • In 2008 I tend to let the OS deal with the paging's file, and both c: and d: are in your local storage so it's the same for me (no iSCSI oin exemple). In 2003 the bestpractice was 2x the memory installed if I remember correctly.

    I use Xenapp and like Milos tell, it's more to know what application you distribute and for how many users. Offline plugin used with Streamed app ? wich use the client memory, etc.. a lot of factor come in play 


    MCP | MCTS 70-236: Exchange Server 2007, Configuring

    Thursday, April 05, 2012 1:00 AM
    Moderator
  • Hi Hakan,

    Please see my recommendation (I follow that personally, be it VMware, Hyper-V VMs or Physical Servers)

    For WS 2003, C drive 40 GB irrespective of OS version and platform. C drive should have 4GB page file.

    For WS 2008/R2, C drive 66 GB irrespective of OS version and platform. C drive should have 6GB page file.

    Aforementioned are basic requirements. 

    As best practice, you need to set page file 1.5 Times the RAM available on any Windows Servers.

    For instance,

    Say, you have 16 GB RAM on a server, 1.5 times the RAM 16 GB = 24 GB;  you need to set 24 GB Page file on the Server. 

    Now, how would you ditribute the page file ?

    Here is the way, You need create a separate Drive and split the Page file (other than the preset page file on C drive)

    For WS 2003, C drive already has 4 GB, now on a newly created drive set 20GB page file (i.e. 24 -4=20 GB), make sure you have at least 25 GB Drive to accomodate 20GB page file.

    For WS 2008/2, C drive already has 6 GB, now on a newly created drive set 18 GB page file (i.e. 24 -6=18 GB), make sure you have at least 23 - 25 GB Drive to accomodate 18GB page file.  

    For more details, you might want to refer following discussion

    Gold Image Build setting question 

    http://social.technet.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/winservergen/thread/e70ec154-916c-427d-b208-79ce4b521be1  


    Thanks


    This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties or guarantees and confers no rights.

    Most of the downtime's are caused because of SysAdmin's curiosity ! - Santosh


    Thursday, April 05, 2012 1:56 AM
    Moderator
  • Paging on a server is not a productive thing to do - paging means dramatic loss in performance.

    The idea behind the so-called 'best-practice' of 1.5x RAM has its roots in the 1990's when RAM was very expensive. This was not a best-practice in those days, it was a necessity.

    If your server is paging, either you are running too many things on it, or your server is not correctly sized and needs more memory.

    • Proposed as answer by Ahmad Deeb Tuesday, November 27, 2012 4:08 PM
    Tuesday, November 27, 2012 2:04 PM
  • Totally agree with The real Gregski. paging file usage should be monitored carefully on servers and always consider adding memory first (if your server accepts).

    Tuesday, November 27, 2012 4:14 PM
  • Hi all,

    Keep in mind the copy on write process of application pages written to by multiple processes / users, the paging of less used pages which frees up physical memory for useful operations and kernel crash dumps (which are not possible without a Pagefile! That's also one of the reasons behind the 1.5 rule) and so on... Having a Pagefile serves a back-up against, for example blue screens and application hangs, and if physical memory is plentiful, and keeping in mind the above reasons, why not configure one?! Paging does not mean performance loss per see, it could even speed a thing or two :-) Perhaps, if you are really confident you have enough physical memory I guess you could test without, but in practice having a page file never hurt anyone, given its correctly configured along with the right amount of physical memory vs the application load you are trying to run.

    This one isn't mine:

    Configuring your pagefile size: To optimally size your paging file you should start all the applications you run at the same time, load typical data sets, and then note the commit charge peak (or look at this value after a period of time where you know maximum load was attained). Set the paging file minimum to be that value minus the amount of RAM in your system (if the value is negative, pick a minimum size to permit the kind of crash dump you are configured for). If you want to have some breathing room for potentially large commit demands, set the maximum to double that number. (Mark Russinovich).

    Gr.




    • Proposed as answer by bas12345 Tuesday, December 18, 2012 8:24 AM
    • Edited by bas12345 Tuesday, December 18, 2012 8:28 AM
    Tuesday, December 18, 2012 8:23 AM
  • RAM beats page file every day of the week. I've been running windows servers with anywhere from 4 to 32 GB ram and a 1 GB page file for months.  From MS:

    "The more RAM that you have available or is added to a computer,  it generally tends to decrease the size of the page file needed.  If you have enough RAM installed in your computer, you may not require a page file at all, unless one is required by a specific application. "

    http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2021748

    I've never done anything with a full memory dump, but maybe others have. Blue screens aren't as common as they used to be, but you have the option of setting a page file to get a full memory dump if you're crashing regularly (unless you're not even getting to the OS, in which case there's probably not much in memory anyway).

    Thursday, May 30, 2013 10:44 AM