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Setting up DNS without a domain

    Question

  • I have done a lot of searching - especially within the TechNet forums and I'm just confused at this point. Currently we are using host file entries so that all the servers can communicate with one another. This has become cumbersome and we would like to setup DNS without having active directory or anything to do with a domain. I have tried taking several shots at this, but have failed each time. I read KB324259 but that didnt do much good for me.

    Help :(

    Wednesday, February 22, 2012 5:03 PM

Answers

  • DNS does not require Active Directory.  You can set up a stand alone DNS server hosting standard primary zone(s).  You would configure your clients to point to your DNS server(s) in their TCP/IP configuration.  You would also need to remove the entries in the HOSTS file as these entries have a higher priority in the name resolution process.  What part of the instructions in KB324259 did not help?

    Install the Windows Server 2008 DNS Service
    http://www.itgeared.com/articles/1073-how-to-install-microsoft-windows-server/
    Video: http://youtu.be/9LWdAtt97Ug

    Guides and tutorials, visit ITGeared.com.

    itgeared.com facebook twitter youtube

    • Proposed as answer by Ace Fekay [MCT]MVP Thursday, February 23, 2012 4:03 AM
    • Marked as answer by Tiger Li Thursday, February 23, 2012 10:20 AM
    Wednesday, February 22, 2012 6:19 PM
  • Hello,

    there is NO need to have a domain to install a DNS server.

    But you MUST have a DNS server if you like to built a domain.


    Best regards

    Meinolf Weber
    MVP, MCP, MCTS
    Microsoft MVP - Directory Services
    My Blog: http://msmvps.com/blogs/mweber/

    Disclaimer: This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties or guarantees , and confers no rights.

    • Proposed as answer by Ace Fekay [MCT]MVP Thursday, February 23, 2012 4:03 AM
    • Marked as answer by Tiger Li Thursday, February 23, 2012 10:20 AM
    Wednesday, February 22, 2012 6:47 PM
  • I second Jorge's question. What part of KB324259 are you having a problem with?

    You really haven't posted what you've tried and where you've got stuck.

    • What operating system version and service pack level will you use for DNS?
    • What else is installed on the server, suxh as apps, services, RRAS, etc.
    • Does it have more than one NIC? If so, why?

    .

    Basically:

    1. You need a static address. This is extremely important.
    2. Choose an IP that's not being used on your network for your server. I will use 192.168.10.10 as an example in these steps.
    3. Configure 192.168.10.10 in your NIC as a static IP address, along with the subnet mask (such as  255.255.255.1), and gateway address (such as 192.168.10.1).
    4. In the DNS settings in the NIC, only configure itself as the only DNS server. THis is EXTREMELY important.
    5. If there is your ISP's, the router as a DNS address, or whatever else is in there in the DNS entries, they all must be removed. You must ONLY use itself. For example, if your server is 192.168.1.10, then put that in for DNS. Leave the bottom DNS entry blank. 
    6. Install DNS on the server.
    7. Optionally, configure a Forwarder (DNS console, servername properties, Forwarders tab). You can use your ISP's. Don't use the router as a DNS address. The router is not a DNS server. Forwarders offload external internet name resolution.
    8. Configure all of your internal clients machines to ONLY USE the IP you've confifgured the server with, such as 192.168.1.10. THis is EXTREMELY important, too!
    9. Create the zone you want to use, such as domain.com. If for a website, create a www record, with the IP of the website. If you want to access the website without www, create a blank hostname (leave the name field blank), and give it the same IP.
    10. Done

    .

    I hope I made my point with the bold entries above. It's important that it has a static IP configuration, the server only use itself and nothing else, as well as all the client machines in your network. If there are any other DNS addresses on the client (confirm with ipconfig /all), then you'll get mixed and unexpected results, and in reality, you'll translate it as "it doesn't work."

    If your DHCP server is your router, then make sure the DHCP service on the router is only providing the DNS address of your DNS server. If you can't get it to do that, which some router DHCP service may have a problem with, then your only choice is to disable the router's DHCP service, and use your server as a DHCP service. This way you have better control over DHCP anyway.

    Ace


    Ace Fekay
    MVP, MCT, MCITP Enterprise Administrator, MCTS Windows 2008 & Exchange 2007 & Exchange 2010, Exchange 2010 Enterprise Administrator, MCSE & MCSA 2003/2000, MCSA Messaging 2003
    Microsoft Certified Trainer
    Microsoft MVP - Directory Services
    Complete List of Technical Blogs: http://www.delawarecountycomputerconsulting.com/technicalblogs.php

    This posting is provided AS-IS with no warranties or guarantees and confers no rights.

    FaceBook Twitter LinkedIn

    • Marked as answer by Tiger Li Thursday, February 23, 2012 10:20 AM
    Thursday, February 23, 2012 4:02 AM

All replies

  • DNS does not require Active Directory.  You can set up a stand alone DNS server hosting standard primary zone(s).  You would configure your clients to point to your DNS server(s) in their TCP/IP configuration.  You would also need to remove the entries in the HOSTS file as these entries have a higher priority in the name resolution process.  What part of the instructions in KB324259 did not help?

    Install the Windows Server 2008 DNS Service
    http://www.itgeared.com/articles/1073-how-to-install-microsoft-windows-server/
    Video: http://youtu.be/9LWdAtt97Ug

    Guides and tutorials, visit ITGeared.com.

    itgeared.com facebook twitter youtube

    • Proposed as answer by Ace Fekay [MCT]MVP Thursday, February 23, 2012 4:03 AM
    • Marked as answer by Tiger Li Thursday, February 23, 2012 10:20 AM
    Wednesday, February 22, 2012 6:19 PM
  • Hello,

    there is NO need to have a domain to install a DNS server.

    But you MUST have a DNS server if you like to built a domain.


    Best regards

    Meinolf Weber
    MVP, MCP, MCTS
    Microsoft MVP - Directory Services
    My Blog: http://msmvps.com/blogs/mweber/

    Disclaimer: This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties or guarantees , and confers no rights.

    • Proposed as answer by Ace Fekay [MCT]MVP Thursday, February 23, 2012 4:03 AM
    • Marked as answer by Tiger Li Thursday, February 23, 2012 10:20 AM
    Wednesday, February 22, 2012 6:47 PM
  • I second Jorge's question. What part of KB324259 are you having a problem with?

    You really haven't posted what you've tried and where you've got stuck.

    • What operating system version and service pack level will you use for DNS?
    • What else is installed on the server, suxh as apps, services, RRAS, etc.
    • Does it have more than one NIC? If so, why?

    .

    Basically:

    1. You need a static address. This is extremely important.
    2. Choose an IP that's not being used on your network for your server. I will use 192.168.10.10 as an example in these steps.
    3. Configure 192.168.10.10 in your NIC as a static IP address, along with the subnet mask (such as  255.255.255.1), and gateway address (such as 192.168.10.1).
    4. In the DNS settings in the NIC, only configure itself as the only DNS server. THis is EXTREMELY important.
    5. If there is your ISP's, the router as a DNS address, or whatever else is in there in the DNS entries, they all must be removed. You must ONLY use itself. For example, if your server is 192.168.1.10, then put that in for DNS. Leave the bottom DNS entry blank. 
    6. Install DNS on the server.
    7. Optionally, configure a Forwarder (DNS console, servername properties, Forwarders tab). You can use your ISP's. Don't use the router as a DNS address. The router is not a DNS server. Forwarders offload external internet name resolution.
    8. Configure all of your internal clients machines to ONLY USE the IP you've confifgured the server with, such as 192.168.1.10. THis is EXTREMELY important, too!
    9. Create the zone you want to use, such as domain.com. If for a website, create a www record, with the IP of the website. If you want to access the website without www, create a blank hostname (leave the name field blank), and give it the same IP.
    10. Done

    .

    I hope I made my point with the bold entries above. It's important that it has a static IP configuration, the server only use itself and nothing else, as well as all the client machines in your network. If there are any other DNS addresses on the client (confirm with ipconfig /all), then you'll get mixed and unexpected results, and in reality, you'll translate it as "it doesn't work."

    If your DHCP server is your router, then make sure the DHCP service on the router is only providing the DNS address of your DNS server. If you can't get it to do that, which some router DHCP service may have a problem with, then your only choice is to disable the router's DHCP service, and use your server as a DHCP service. This way you have better control over DHCP anyway.

    Ace


    Ace Fekay
    MVP, MCT, MCITP Enterprise Administrator, MCTS Windows 2008 & Exchange 2007 & Exchange 2010, Exchange 2010 Enterprise Administrator, MCSE & MCSA 2003/2000, MCSA Messaging 2003
    Microsoft Certified Trainer
    Microsoft MVP - Directory Services
    Complete List of Technical Blogs: http://www.delawarecountycomputerconsulting.com/technicalblogs.php

    This posting is provided AS-IS with no warranties or guarantees and confers no rights.

    FaceBook Twitter LinkedIn

    • Marked as answer by Tiger Li Thursday, February 23, 2012 10:20 AM
    Thursday, February 23, 2012 4:02 AM