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Migration Novell Netware 6.5 to Windows Server 2008

    Question

  • Our company wants to migrate from Novell Netware 6.5 to Microsoft Windows server 2008.

    This will be done by taking a full copy of all files and folders and copy them over to the new Windows
    environment. All folder rights will be migrated from Novell nts to Microsoft ntfs.

    The problem is the fact that in Novell you see the full path to a shared folder,
    however in Windows you don't.

    For example you have the following path to a folder:

    U:\ROOT\FOLDER1\FOLDER2\FOLDER3

    The FOLDER1 and FOLDER2 contains several files and folders.

    In Novell when you give read/write access to FOLDER3 only, you will see the full path but

    not the folders and files were the user has no rights to.

     In Windows you will see only FOLDER3, not the full path.

    When you set read permission on the ROOT you will see all folders inside the tree below ROOT

    which of course should not be possible.

    Any idea how to setup this structure on Windows ?

    Monday, October 01, 2012 3:33 PM

Answers

  • Actually a question I have to ask is why are you migrating from NetWare 6.5 to Windows 2008?  Wouldn't it make more sense to migrate to Open Enterprise Server 11?  You'd continue to manage your environment with the same tools you use now, users' workstations wouldn't have to be reconfigured, etc.  You also wouldn't have the issue you asked about with the difference in representing folders since you'd still be using NSS.

    Joe

    Tuesday, October 09, 2012 1:16 AM
  • I have to ask the same question. Why would you migrate to a platform that does have the same interoperability as what you are using now. Not only will you be able to use the same tools you have always used, but you will get to take advantage of open source. You will still get to maintain your eDirectory structure, use the same tools you have always managed it from as well as run it on Linux in a much more advanced, stable and adaptable environment. You could maintain NSS, as well as take advantage of all the Linux file system support. You can mount a Linux File system as your sys volume and maintain the exact same file structure that you have in place now.
    Tuesday, October 09, 2012 2:29 PM
  • The feature you want to enable is called access based enumeration.

    here is a guide for it.


    David Hood www.consilium-uk.com

    Tuesday, October 09, 2012 9:18 PM

All replies

  • Actually a question I have to ask is why are you migrating from NetWare 6.5 to Windows 2008?  Wouldn't it make more sense to migrate to Open Enterprise Server 11?  You'd continue to manage your environment with the same tools you use now, users' workstations wouldn't have to be reconfigured, etc.  You also wouldn't have the issue you asked about with the difference in representing folders since you'd still be using NSS.

    Joe

    Tuesday, October 09, 2012 1:16 AM
  • I have to ask the same question. Why would you migrate to a platform that does have the same interoperability as what you are using now. Not only will you be able to use the same tools you have always used, but you will get to take advantage of open source. You will still get to maintain your eDirectory structure, use the same tools you have always managed it from as well as run it on Linux in a much more advanced, stable and adaptable environment. You could maintain NSS, as well as take advantage of all the Linux file system support. You can mount a Linux File system as your sys volume and maintain the exact same file structure that you have in place now.
    Tuesday, October 09, 2012 2:29 PM
  • The feature you want to enable is called access based enumeration.

    here is a guide for it.


    David Hood www.consilium-uk.com

    Tuesday, October 09, 2012 9:18 PM
  • Hi YouriBouri,

    My company is in the process of doing the excact same migration. Can you tell me how and what tools did you use to accomplish this migration.

    Any info and/or advise would be much apperciated.

    Thank You in Advance

    The Microsoft Newbie

    Tuesday, June 11, 2013 10:24 PM
  • Veteran of many such migrations here in secure environments.  What you need to know:

    NDS Migrator does some things well.  Copying files and file rights is not one of them. You will need to do this MANUALLY.

    This is the "long way" for sure.  Planning for such a task is daunting, but it will indeed reward you in the end.  And yeah, I know, you weren't planning to do this, but... you gotta do it this way.  Let's think about it:

    1.  This is when you need to examine your file structures for security, ease of administration, long file name/path issues, remediate storage issues, etc.  And yes, Windows doesn't like to do stuff that we've done with Novell for 20 years or so.  In other words, it would probably be malpractice to simply copy over file structure. 

    2.  Although effectively on both sides you've either got RO or RW rights to almost everything, you cannot easily translate those rights.  I've made thousands of dollars when tools to translate those rights proved to have even 1 mistake that was discovered by someone important, which then lead to a job of checking-every-last-folder-for-rights in the entire thing.  Cause once you lose faith in the tool or scrip, you're gonna check everything. 

    Use Trustee.nlm and DSReports to document your current rights, ownership, etc.  Then create your target file structure, and give them rights manually.  After that, use Robocopy to keep em sync'd. 

    KEEP A COPY OF THOSE TRUSTEE REPORTS IN CASE YOU ARE LATER QUESTIONED!!!!!  The job you save might in fact be your own!


    - Tim Wohlford

    Tuesday, June 18, 2013 5:17 PM
  • I think what you want to have is a tool like migRaven? You want to give rw rights to a folder and you want the user to go to the folder.

    For having this scenario, you have to give "list folder" rights to the folders above. You can do that manually or use a Tool like migRaven.

    The advantage with migRaven would be, you can read the old folderstrukture, give the rights in a graphical interface like you want and write the strukture on the new server and also write the acls on the new filesystem including the list rights.


    • Edited by Aikux Monday, June 24, 2013 12:35 PM unterstreichen
    Monday, June 24, 2013 12:34 PM
  • As odd as this may sound, Novell has the tool to do this if you absolutely must migrate instead of going the easy route and simply moving to Novell Open Enterprise Server 11.  If you're still dead set on moving to Windows, you can do this using Novell Storage Manager.  It will migrate your files preserving the existing metadata such as time stamps and security.  In addition, unlike other tools which you simply "throw away" after the migration you can continue using Novell Storage Manager to manage your Windows-based storage environment.  In fact Storage Manager allows you to manage quotas much more easily than any native Microsoft tools.  You'll also find Storage Manager much more cost effective than many of the other migration tools out there.

    Here's a link to more info.

    http://www.novell.com/products/storage-manager/

    Joe

    Monday, June 24, 2013 4:20 PM
  • Joe -- didn't immediately think of NSM.  That is not a bad idea at all.

    The problems that one runs into during migration, however, far exceed simple file copy and rights transfer.  Normally, you need to fix "dirty" directory right structure:

    -Kill IRF's
    -Flatten structure to, among other things, fix long path names
    -Kill rights given to user objects (group membership only)
    -Kill rights give via OU
    -Kill security equivelences
    -Identify data owners
    -And fix flat out wrong security settings

    In this process, you'll also end up renaming a few user objects and a few group object 'cause you can't have the same object name for 2 objects in AD (you can in eDir obviously). 

    So, the data modeling thing is gonna happen, and yeah, it would be nice to have a graphical tool to assist with this.  However, by the time you fix all of the Novell-AD issues, you'll at least see it isn't a simple data copy.


    - Tim Wohlford

    Monday, June 24, 2013 5:41 PM
  • You are correct in saying that it's not a simple data copy.  It never is.  That's precisely why Novell Storage Manager is a great solution to this as it includes a mapping feature to map users and groups so that rights are assigned properly.  It won't clean up any rights issues that exist in the source, but then again nothing will do that as it's simply not possible to automate something like that.  However the rest of the process can easily be handled by NSM.

    Joe

    Tuesday, June 25, 2013 10:13 PM