none
Deploying printers in 2008 R2: GPO vs GPP. What's the difference?

    Question

  • Hi.  I started experimenting with deploying some network shared printers via Group Policy.  The printers are connected to a 2008 R2 with Print Server role and then shared out on the network.  The clients are Win 7 64bit. 

    I first started by deploying a GPO, setting the Computer\Policies\Admin Templates\Printers\Point and Print Restrictions to ENABLE, and then adding individual printers under Computer\Policies\Windows\Deployed Printers That seems to work OK and the printers get deployed to the clients (after gpudpate/force and/or restart).

    But I also noticed that you can deploy server shared printers under User\Preferences\Control Panel\Printersby adding a shared printer.  This is the only place where I found I can designate which printer is set as default, which made me wonder what happens if I deploy a printer through the GPO "Deployed Printer" above, and then combine it with GPP with "Update" action in order to designate it as default.  Do they overlap or complement each other?

    It also made me wonder what the difference might be in deploying printers via GPO "deployed printers" vs "GPP printers," especially when talking about the server SHARED printers.  Do they both produce the same result (simply connecting to a server\printer)?


    • Edited by Jiveman Monday, July 23, 2012 6:15 PM
    Monday, July 23, 2012 6:14 PM

Answers

  • Deployed printers was introduced before printers deployed via Group Policy Preferences. I would strongly recommend you to use only Group Policy Preferences do deploy printers as combining two mechanisms is not good from a troubleshooting perspective. Group Policy Preferences also gives you more features as you have already noticed and it also gives you improved logging and great possibilities to target what printer will be mapped to which users or machines.

    Blogging about Windows for IT pros at www.theexperienceblog.com

    • Marked as answer by Jiveman Tuesday, July 24, 2012 2:14 PM
    Monday, July 23, 2012 8:27 PM
  • Hi,

    > Do they both produce the same result (simply connecting to a server\printer)?

    Same result to deploy printer. However Group Policy Preference is new feature introduced in Windows Server 2008, it is new tech so it has more functions.

    New functions like central logging into the event log (built-in with preferences) and the option to set printer as the “Default Printer”. Even there you can use preference item-level targeting to filter the printer list down so that every user gets favorite printer shared.

    Also it’s easier than traditional Group Policy to deploy shared printer.

    For more information please refer to following articles:

    Configure a Shared Printer Item
    http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc732092.aspx
    GP Preferences: Add a new printer, set as default
    http://blogs.technet.com/b/grouppolicy/archive/2009/06/24/gp-preferences-set-a-default-printer.aspx
    10 things Group Policy Preferences can do better
    http://www.frickelsoft.net/blog/downloads/10%20things%20Group%20Policy%20Preferences%20does%20better.pdf


    Lawrence

    TechNet Community Support

    • Marked as answer by Jiveman Tuesday, July 24, 2012 2:14 PM
    Tuesday, July 24, 2012 2:48 AM
    Moderator

All replies

  • Deployed printers was introduced before printers deployed via Group Policy Preferences. I would strongly recommend you to use only Group Policy Preferences do deploy printers as combining two mechanisms is not good from a troubleshooting perspective. Group Policy Preferences also gives you more features as you have already noticed and it also gives you improved logging and great possibilities to target what printer will be mapped to which users or machines.

    Blogging about Windows for IT pros at www.theexperienceblog.com

    • Marked as answer by Jiveman Tuesday, July 24, 2012 2:14 PM
    Monday, July 23, 2012 8:27 PM
  • Hi,

    > Do they both produce the same result (simply connecting to a server\printer)?

    Same result to deploy printer. However Group Policy Preference is new feature introduced in Windows Server 2008, it is new tech so it has more functions.

    New functions like central logging into the event log (built-in with preferences) and the option to set printer as the “Default Printer”. Even there you can use preference item-level targeting to filter the printer list down so that every user gets favorite printer shared.

    Also it’s easier than traditional Group Policy to deploy shared printer.

    For more information please refer to following articles:

    Configure a Shared Printer Item
    http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc732092.aspx
    GP Preferences: Add a new printer, set as default
    http://blogs.technet.com/b/grouppolicy/archive/2009/06/24/gp-preferences-set-a-default-printer.aspx
    10 things Group Policy Preferences can do better
    http://www.frickelsoft.net/blog/downloads/10%20things%20Group%20Policy%20Preferences%20does%20better.pdf


    Lawrence

    TechNet Community Support

    • Marked as answer by Jiveman Tuesday, July 24, 2012 2:14 PM
    Tuesday, July 24, 2012 2:48 AM
    Moderator
  • Thanks!
    Tuesday, July 24, 2012 2:13 PM
  • Deployed printers was introduced before printers deployed via Group Policy Preferences. I would strongly recommend you to use only Group Policy Preferences do deploy printers as combining two mechanisms is not good from a troubleshooting perspective. Group Policy Preferences also gives you more features as you have already noticed and it also gives you improved logging and great possibilities to target what printer will be mapped to which users or machines.

    I like GPP very often, but i have not found a solution to deploy printers on computer base to access a shared printer on a print server. Only the "old" Computer\Policies\Windows\Deployed Printers will create a printer object on the Windows 7 Workstations. But this work only after a restart of the W7 Workstation not on gpupdate or gpupdate /force or pushprinterconnections. Oddly, no longer available printers in the GPO are deleted by a gpupdate. do you know a solution (GPP preferred :D )

    MB@BBN

    Friday, November 23, 2012 9:56 AM
  •  
    > I like GPP very often, but i have not found a solution to deploy
    > printers on computer base to access a shared printer on a print server.
     
    Have a look at the "common" tab and "Item Level Targeting". Here you may
    filter for groups the computer is a member of, or LDAP queries, or
    whatever you like. Even in a user GPO. So there's no need to assign
    printers in computer GPOs.
     
    regards, Martin
     

    NO THEY ARE NOT EVIL, if you know what you are doing: Good or bad GPOs?
    Wenn meine Antwort hilfreich war, freue ich mich über eine Bewertung! If my answer was helpful, I'm glad about a rating!
    Friday, November 23, 2012 10:21 AM
  •  > I like GPP very often, but i have not found a solution to deploy
    > printers on computer base to access a shared printer on a print server.
     
    Have a look at the "common" tab and "Item Level Targeting". Here you may
    filter for groups the computer is a member of, or LDAP queries, or
    whatever you like. Even in a user GPO. So there's no need to assign
    printers in computer GPOs.

    Are you really sure about that? How printing local services running on machines there are no users logged in? At the moment I set up local printers the are printing via LPR / LPD to a Microsoft print servers. To handle 100 printers on more than 60 Servers are difficult and error prone.

    To deploy this type of  local printer with the GPP is not possible then the DNS Name/IP is for each printer is the same and only the queue name are different.But GPP create only one tcp/ip port and the last queue name wins.

    MBatBBN

    Friday, November 23, 2012 12:01 PM
  •  
    > Howprinting local services running on machines there are no users
    > logged in?
     
    Now I get the picture - didn't take this scenario into account ;-) Yes,
    indeed: I don't believe this is possible through GPP.
     

    NO THEY ARE NOT EVIL, if you know what you are doing: Good or bad GPOs?
    Wenn meine Antwort hilfreich war, freue ich mich über eine Bewertung! If my answer was helpful, I'm glad about a rating!
    Friday, November 23, 2012 12:46 PM