none
Can't get the ping result to see the right IP Address

    Question

  • Just so I give some information:

    I have a private domain mydomain.lan with a public domain: mydomain.com

    I had an issue where I was trying to get the fully public qualification of one PC (app) to work..

    So if I ping app, I get my private IP address to work (this being my exchange)

    If I type ping app.mydomain.com, it will fail because there is not recognized

    So I have done : the instruction on someone:

    Your original question: 
    > In order for our internal users to access the videos via the Media.Public.org url, what do I need to do in DNS to make this work?

    Based on what you've originally posted, that is there is no public.org zone internally, then the EASIEST way to make this work is by NOT creating a public.org zone, but rather creating a media.public.org zone and creating a blank host entry, as I explained in my previous post.

    • Right-click Foward Lookup Zones
    • New Zone
    • Choose Primary zone
    • Keep the checkbox checked for "Store the zone in Active Directory..."
    • Click next choosing the defaults
    • For the zone name, type in media.public.org
    • Do not allow updates
    • Finish
    • Then right click the new zone
    • Choose New Host
    • Leave the hostname <BLANK>
    • Type in the internal IP of the media server
    • Click OK
    • Test it

    Note - Creating this namespace will NOT affect anything else, and making a namespace like this keeps it totally secluded and targeted ONLY for this namespace and any records under it, such as the blank host entry, and it will NOT affect or have anything to do with the parent zone, public.org. 

    This is actually standard practice when creating internal records to access internally hosted resources, such as Exchange, IIS, etc. Matter of fact, if your Exchange server is nosted internally, in all cases, we create a mail.public.org zone AND an autodiscover.public.org zone internally, just as above, and create a blank hostname with the private IP of the Exchange server. Externally, it will be the public IP. This way, Outlook, OWA, etc, can use the same exact name inside and out. This works perfectly for laptops coming and going, whether inside the network, or at home or Starbucks.

    Initially, it worked but I made a mistake of deleting it ... 

    I readded the zone in but when I ping app.mydomain.com, I get a different IP Address

    For example, if ping app, I get a reply on the IP Address 10.10.1.201

    but when i type ping app.mydomain.com I get a time out because the IP Address shows 10.10.0.201 (which I do not know where it is coming from)... 

    Would appreciate it.. I have pointed the DNS setting pointing to AD (integrated AD) and still no luck... I just do not know where to look for 10.10.0.201 record.. 

    Monday, November 19, 2012 5:11 PM

Answers

  • So I have done : the instruction on someone:

    Your original question:
    > In order for our internal users to access the videos via the Media.Public.org url, what do I need to do in DNS to make this work?

    Based on what you've originally posted, that is there is no public.org zone internally, then the EASIEST way to make this work is by NOT creating a public.org zone, but rather creating a media.public.org zone and creating a blank host entry, as I explained in my previous post.

    • Right-click Foward Lookup Zones
    • New Zone
    • Choose Primary zone
    • Keep the checkbox checked for "Store the zone in Active Directory..."
    • Click next choosing the defaults
    • For the zone name, type in media.public.org
    • Do not allow updates
    • Finish
    • Then right click the new zone
    • Choose New Host
    • Leave the hostname <BLANK>
    • Type in the internal IP of the media server
    • Click OK
    • Test it

    Note - Creating this namespace will NOT affect anything else, and making a namespace like this keeps it totally secluded and targeted ONLY for this namespace and any records under it, such as the blank host entry, and it will NOT affect or have anything to do with the parent zone, public.org.

    This is actually standard practice when creating internal records to access internally hosted resources, such as Exchange, IIS, etc. Matter of fact, if your Exchange server is nosted internally, in all cases, we create a mail.public.org zone AND an autodiscover.public.org zone internally, just as above, and create a blank hostname with the private IP of the Exchange server. Externally, it will be the public IP. This way, Outlook, OWA, etc, can use the same exact name inside and out. This works perfectly for laptops coming and going, whether inside the network, or at home or Starbucks.

    Just to point out, that whole passage above was copied from one of my posts in this thread:

    Thread: "How to set up DNS when External Domain Name is different than internal domain name" 12/31/2011
    http://social.technet.microsoft.com/Forums/zh/winserverNIS/thread/69f79a68-07ba-4b25-b6da-2918adf2e8c7

    .

    For example, if ping app, I get a reply on the IP Address 10.10.1.201

    but when i type ping app.mydomain.com I get a time out because the IP Address shows 10.10.0.201 (which I do not know where it is coming from)...

    Would appreciate it.. I have pointed the DNS setting pointing to AD (integrated AD) and still no luck... I just do not know where to look for 10.10.0.201 record..

    FYI, if you ping by a single name, such as ping app - it will suffix the machine's Search Suffix. Run an ipconfig /all and you will see that suffix. That is how the client side resolver works. If there is a Search Suffix, it will "suffix" it to the end of the single name. If there are more than one, it will suffix them in the order provided until one responds, and if not, it will then use NetBIOS (there are more steps than that, but this is a summary of how it works). And if NetBIOS is used, and you are using WINS, then WINS will be used.

    .

    I readded the zone in but when I ping app.mydomain.com, I get a different IP Address

    If you re-added the zone, did you create a blank host record with 10.10.1.201?

    .

    Let's see the results using nslookup, because nslookup is the true tool to diagnose and resolve DNS resolution.

    • nslookup app
    • nslookup app.mydomain.com
    • nslookup app.mydomain.lan
    • Unedited ipconfig /all from the machine you are running this on.

    .

    Thank you.


    Ace Fekay
    MVP, MCT, MCITP/EA, MCTS Windows 2008/R2 & Exchange 2007, Exchange 2010 EA, MCSE & MCSA 2003/2000, MCSA Messaging 2003
    Microsoft Certified Trainer
    Microsoft MVP - Directory Services
    Technical Blogs & Videos: http://www.delawarecountycomputerconsulting.com/

    This post is provided AS-IS with no warranties or guarantees and confers no rights.

    FaceBookTwitterLinkedIn


    Tuesday, November 20, 2012 4:51 AM

All replies

  • Something bug me;

    You got a zone named; media.public.org

    Not app.public.org

    Does the nameserver on mydomain.com/public.org are your internal DNS ? A mis-entry on the nameserver would explain the symptom you got. As if the zone does not exist your DNS will use it's forwarder to resolve the request.


    MCP | MCTS 70-236: Exchange Server 2007, Configuring

    Want to follow me ?  |  Blog: http://www.jabea.net | http://blogs.technet.com/b/wikininjas/

    Tuesday, November 20, 2012 4:08 AM
  • So I have done : the instruction on someone:

    Your original question:
    > In order for our internal users to access the videos via the Media.Public.org url, what do I need to do in DNS to make this work?

    Based on what you've originally posted, that is there is no public.org zone internally, then the EASIEST way to make this work is by NOT creating a public.org zone, but rather creating a media.public.org zone and creating a blank host entry, as I explained in my previous post.

    • Right-click Foward Lookup Zones
    • New Zone
    • Choose Primary zone
    • Keep the checkbox checked for "Store the zone in Active Directory..."
    • Click next choosing the defaults
    • For the zone name, type in media.public.org
    • Do not allow updates
    • Finish
    • Then right click the new zone
    • Choose New Host
    • Leave the hostname <BLANK>
    • Type in the internal IP of the media server
    • Click OK
    • Test it

    Note - Creating this namespace will NOT affect anything else, and making a namespace like this keeps it totally secluded and targeted ONLY for this namespace and any records under it, such as the blank host entry, and it will NOT affect or have anything to do with the parent zone, public.org.

    This is actually standard practice when creating internal records to access internally hosted resources, such as Exchange, IIS, etc. Matter of fact, if your Exchange server is nosted internally, in all cases, we create a mail.public.org zone AND an autodiscover.public.org zone internally, just as above, and create a blank hostname with the private IP of the Exchange server. Externally, it will be the public IP. This way, Outlook, OWA, etc, can use the same exact name inside and out. This works perfectly for laptops coming and going, whether inside the network, or at home or Starbucks.

    Just to point out, that whole passage above was copied from one of my posts in this thread:

    Thread: "How to set up DNS when External Domain Name is different than internal domain name" 12/31/2011
    http://social.technet.microsoft.com/Forums/zh/winserverNIS/thread/69f79a68-07ba-4b25-b6da-2918adf2e8c7

    .

    For example, if ping app, I get a reply on the IP Address 10.10.1.201

    but when i type ping app.mydomain.com I get a time out because the IP Address shows 10.10.0.201 (which I do not know where it is coming from)...

    Would appreciate it.. I have pointed the DNS setting pointing to AD (integrated AD) and still no luck... I just do not know where to look for 10.10.0.201 record..

    FYI, if you ping by a single name, such as ping app - it will suffix the machine's Search Suffix. Run an ipconfig /all and you will see that suffix. That is how the client side resolver works. If there is a Search Suffix, it will "suffix" it to the end of the single name. If there are more than one, it will suffix them in the order provided until one responds, and if not, it will then use NetBIOS (there are more steps than that, but this is a summary of how it works). And if NetBIOS is used, and you are using WINS, then WINS will be used.

    .

    I readded the zone in but when I ping app.mydomain.com, I get a different IP Address

    If you re-added the zone, did you create a blank host record with 10.10.1.201?

    .

    Let's see the results using nslookup, because nslookup is the true tool to diagnose and resolve DNS resolution.

    • nslookup app
    • nslookup app.mydomain.com
    • nslookup app.mydomain.lan
    • Unedited ipconfig /all from the machine you are running this on.

    .

    Thank you.


    Ace Fekay
    MVP, MCT, MCITP/EA, MCTS Windows 2008/R2 & Exchange 2007, Exchange 2010 EA, MCSE & MCSA 2003/2000, MCSA Messaging 2003
    Microsoft Certified Trainer
    Microsoft MVP - Directory Services
    Technical Blogs & Videos: http://www.delawarecountycomputerconsulting.com/

    This post is provided AS-IS with no warranties or guarantees and confers no rights.

    FaceBookTwitterLinkedIn


    Tuesday, November 20, 2012 4:51 AM