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Supersedence of some Office 2010 packages

    Question

  • Hi all,

    I have a WSUS 3.0 SP2 setup on a 2003 domain with mixed Windows 7 and Windows XP machines, all 32-bit. I've been applying updates using the supersedence column sort so that only the latest and most comprehensive packages are applied. I've approved all packages that have the blue square on top and the ones which have no supersedence icon, and all have been correctly applied.

    However there are a few superseded Office packages that are still reported as needed for my computers, some with the blue square on the middle and some with the blue square on the bottom. For example:

    - KB2553455 (bottom square), which has been superseded by KB2597091

    - KB2597091 (middle square), which has been superseded by KB2687509 and KB2598289

    When I go to the details of KB2687509 and KB2598289, both report as Not Applicable for any of my computers, so they aren't supposed to be installed on the computers.

    What should I do to sort this out?

    Thanks

    Gustavo

    Wednesday, January 30, 2013 2:09 PM

Answers

  • However there are a few superseded Office packages that are still reported as needed for my computers, some with the blue square on the middle and some with the blue square on the bottom. For example:

    - KB2553455 (bottom square), which has been superseded by KB2597091

    - KB2597091 (middle square), which has been superseded by KB2687509 and KB2598289

    When I go to the details of KB2687509 and KB2598289, both report as Not Applicable for any of my computers, so they aren't supposed to be installed on the computers.

    What should I do to sort this out?

    Approve and Install KB2597091.

    Then investigate why KB2687509 is reporting as Not Applicable. Reading the Issues this Update Fixes section should shed light on that answer. There's also an apparent defect in the supersession metadata for this update, as KB2687509 doesn't replace anything according to the KB article, and given the criteria for it's relevance, I would tend to agree.

    KB2598289 was superseded by KB2687509 so it's not relevant in this discussion.

    An update being superseded should not be your only criteria for approval; also relevant is whether the client says the update is Needed (read: Not Installed). If the update is Not Installed, and it's the latest updates in a chain reported as Needed by that client (not necessarily the latest update in the chain entirely), then it needs to be installed.

    It's entirely possible for an update package to be applicable to more than one environment, but then a new update for only one (or some) of those environments is released to fix an issue only related to those environments. In this case, the older (now superseded) update is still applicable to those other environments.

    It's also worth pointing out that the only reason you've encountered this scenario is because KB2553455 (or KB2597901) weren't installed a year ago when they were originally released. Otherwise, if KB2587901 had been installed in Feb 2012, you might never have cared about the fact that KB2687509 is Not Applicable.


    Lawrence Garvin, M.S., MCITP:EA, MCDBA, MCSA
    SolarWinds Head Geek
    Microsoft MVP - Software Distribution (2005-2013)
    My MVP Profile: http://mvp.support.microsoft.com/profile/Lawrence.Garvin
    The views expressed on this post are mine and do not necessarily reflect the views of SolarWinds.

    Saturday, February 02, 2013 12:20 AM
  • Hi Lawrence, thanks for your reply.

    These machines had never been updated, that's why you see so many old packages. The WSUS server has been deployed to solve this issue.

    Anyway, the main problem is that Office 2010 SP1 wasn't available in the WSUS server, and once it was installed, the workstations started requesting for KB2687509, and the supersedence chain worked out correctly. Now I have all workstations with 0 needed updates, which is good :)

    Thanks for your help.

    Saturday, February 02, 2013 6:40 PM

All replies

  • However there are a few superseded Office packages that are still reported as needed for my computers, some with the blue square on the middle and some with the blue square on the bottom. For example:

    - KB2553455 (bottom square), which has been superseded by KB2597091

    - KB2597091 (middle square), which has been superseded by KB2687509 and KB2598289

    When I go to the details of KB2687509 and KB2598289, both report as Not Applicable for any of my computers, so they aren't supposed to be installed on the computers.

    What should I do to sort this out?

    Approve and Install KB2597091.

    Then investigate why KB2687509 is reporting as Not Applicable. Reading the Issues this Update Fixes section should shed light on that answer. There's also an apparent defect in the supersession metadata for this update, as KB2687509 doesn't replace anything according to the KB article, and given the criteria for it's relevance, I would tend to agree.

    KB2598289 was superseded by KB2687509 so it's not relevant in this discussion.

    An update being superseded should not be your only criteria for approval; also relevant is whether the client says the update is Needed (read: Not Installed). If the update is Not Installed, and it's the latest updates in a chain reported as Needed by that client (not necessarily the latest update in the chain entirely), then it needs to be installed.

    It's entirely possible for an update package to be applicable to more than one environment, but then a new update for only one (or some) of those environments is released to fix an issue only related to those environments. In this case, the older (now superseded) update is still applicable to those other environments.

    It's also worth pointing out that the only reason you've encountered this scenario is because KB2553455 (or KB2597901) weren't installed a year ago when they were originally released. Otherwise, if KB2587901 had been installed in Feb 2012, you might never have cared about the fact that KB2687509 is Not Applicable.


    Lawrence Garvin, M.S., MCITP:EA, MCDBA, MCSA
    SolarWinds Head Geek
    Microsoft MVP - Software Distribution (2005-2013)
    My MVP Profile: http://mvp.support.microsoft.com/profile/Lawrence.Garvin
    The views expressed on this post are mine and do not necessarily reflect the views of SolarWinds.

    Saturday, February 02, 2013 12:20 AM
  • Hi Lawrence, thanks for your reply.

    These machines had never been updated, that's why you see so many old packages. The WSUS server has been deployed to solve this issue.

    Anyway, the main problem is that Office 2010 SP1 wasn't available in the WSUS server, and once it was installed, the workstations started requesting for KB2687509, and the supersedence chain worked out correctly. Now I have all workstations with 0 needed updates, which is good :)

    Thanks for your help.

    Saturday, February 02, 2013 6:40 PM
  • Anyway, the main problem is that Office 2010 SP1 wasn't available in the WSUS server, and once it was installed, the workstations started requesting for KB2687509, and the supersedence chain worked out correctly.

    Aha! Good discovery! I hadn't considered the SP1 impact, but yes it's not uncommon for an update to require a certain SP-level to be applicable, particularly as the SP becomes older and older. It's just not practical to maintain multiple code branches to fix bugs, so they only get fixed in the current SP-level.

    Lawrence Garvin, M.S., MCITP:EA, MCDBA, MCSA
    SolarWinds Head Geek
    Microsoft MVP - Software Distribution (2005-2013)
    My MVP Profile: http://mvp.support.microsoft.com/profile/Lawrence.Garvin
    The views expressed on this post are mine and do not necessarily reflect the views of SolarWinds.

    Sunday, February 03, 2013 2:27 AM