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What are the implications of Windows Server 2012 Std Edition being an only server and domain controller?

    Question

  • I just purchased low end server with Windows Server 2012 Std Edition to be used on my home network. Network includes 2 more computers at this time out of which really only one is used. I am the only user. I don't intend to expose any of the services to the internet.

    Main reason is that I want to learn Windows technologies that require domain environment (Windows Clustering, SQL Server 2012 Always On Availability, etc.). Plus I want to run Jira and Confluence on it because my laptop is a bit too slow for this (that I can do whether it is domain controller or not).

    Proper way to do this as I learned is to have 2 dedicated domain controllers that are not used for anything else and then other servers for SQL Server, IIS, etc. However, this would cost too much and would really be an overkill for my usage.

    So I would like to make server a domain controller and run all my applications on it as well (if I can't have it as domain controller I will still have a lot of use for it). One thing I learned already that Microsoft does not recommend to run SQL Server on domain controller mostly for performance reasons (it will however install just fine).

    Is there any other software that is known not to work on domain controller at all? Or that would be limited in functionality in some way?

    Are there any other negative implications of domain controller performing all server functions?

    Friday, June 14, 2013 3:00 PM

Answers

  • In a home lab-type environment as you're describing, there isn't really a downside.  Although what you might want to consider doing, is one that Server 2012, enable Hyper-V, then within the Hyper-V create your Domain Controller(s), etc, etc.

    Then you can more easily play with features like SQL Always On (which requires 2 servers,) clustering (2+ servers,) etc.

    But also, be aware of the licensing requirements.  You would need one Server CAL for each VM, or you would have to use the trial edition (they still have that for 2012, yes?)

    I've got a similar home lab setup consisting of 2 home-built servers, each with Server 2012 Hyper-V, each hosting a VM running as a Domain Controller, plus my other VMs (Win8, SQL2012, SQL2008)

    Jason


    Jason A.

    • Marked as answer by JoeSchmoe115 Friday, June 14, 2013 5:18 PM
    Friday, June 14, 2013 3:08 PM

All replies

  • In a home lab-type environment as you're describing, there isn't really a downside.  Although what you might want to consider doing, is one that Server 2012, enable Hyper-V, then within the Hyper-V create your Domain Controller(s), etc, etc.

    Then you can more easily play with features like SQL Always On (which requires 2 servers,) clustering (2+ servers,) etc.

    But also, be aware of the licensing requirements.  You would need one Server CAL for each VM, or you would have to use the trial edition (they still have that for 2012, yes?)

    I've got a similar home lab setup consisting of 2 home-built servers, each with Server 2012 Hyper-V, each hosting a VM running as a Domain Controller, plus my other VMs (Win8, SQL2012, SQL2008)

    Jason


    Jason A.

    • Marked as answer by JoeSchmoe115 Friday, June 14, 2013 5:18 PM
    Friday, June 14, 2013 3:08 PM
  • In a home lab-type environment as you're describing, there isn't really a downside.  Although what you might want to consider doing, is one that Server 2012, enable Hyper-V, then within the Hyper-V create your Domain Controller(s), etc, etc.

    Then you can more easily play with features like SQL Always On (which requires 2 servers,) clustering (2+ servers,) etc.

    But also, be aware of the licensing requirements.  You would need one Server CAL for each VM, or you would have to use the trial edition (they still have that for 2012, yes?)

    I've got a similar home lab setup consisting of 2 home-built servers, each with Server 2012 Hyper-V, each hosting a VM running as a Domain Controller, plus my other VMs (Win8, SQL2012, SQL2008)

    Jason


    Jason A.


    Yes, 180 day trial editions are still available. Have you used them in the past? What happens after 180 days? Can I just setup new trial edition in VM from scratch?
    Friday, June 14, 2013 4:20 PM
  • It's been a while since I checked, I wasn't sure...

    What I've seen happen is, when you log into a system using an expired trial, you get the "this may not be a legal copy..." message, the desktop is black, and I think (it's been a while, and I don't typically stay logged in that long) it will log you out after a couple minutes.

    Yes, you can keep installing trial editions to your hearts content...

    If you think you'd be doing this on a regular basis, I'd lean towards looking at getting a Technet subscription, makes it much easier to do things like this as the installs don't "time out," plus you get access to almost everything MS has released (DOS 6.22 and Win3.11!) or will release...

    Jason


    Jason A.

    Friday, June 14, 2013 4:27 PM
  • It's been a while since I checked, I wasn't sure...

    What I've seen happen is, when you log into a system using an expired trial, you get the "this may not be a legal copy..." message, the desktop is black, and I think (it's been a while, and I don't typically stay logged in that long) it will log you out after a couple minutes.

    Yes, you can keep installing trial editions to your hearts content...

    If you think you'd be doing this on a regular basis, I'd lean towards looking at getting a Technet subscription, makes it much easier to do things like this as the installs don't "time out," plus you get access to almost everything MS has released (DOS 6.22 and Win3.11!) or will release...

    Jason


    Jason A.


    I haven't looked at Technet in a long time. It turns out to be a very good deal! Can you tell (if you currently have it) how many licenses of each product do you get? Are any of the products time-limited?
    Friday, June 14, 2013 5:06 PM
  • They recently cut the number of keys from 10 to 5, but anything you download from your Technet subscription doesn't expire.

    Just keep in mind the license restriction, you get to use the Technet downloads for evaluation purposes, so don't go running a business off them!  :-)

    I think the only way you run into time limits would be if you download the evaluation copies, rather than the "licensed" copies from Technet.  When you purchase a Technet Subscription, they have a special download site you get your products from, rather than the "normal" public downloads.

    Jason


    Jason A.

    Friday, June 14, 2013 5:12 PM
  • They recently cut the number of keys from 10 to 5, but anything you download from your Technet subscription doesn't expire.

    Just keep in mind the license restriction, you get to use the Technet downloads for evaluation purposes, so don't go running a business off them!  :-)

    I think the only way you run into time limits would be if you download the evaluation copies, rather than the "licensed" copies from Technet.  When you purchase a Technet Subscription, they have a special download site you get your products from, rather than the "normal" public downloads.

    Jason


    Jason A.


    Thanks a lot for reminding me about Technet. For my evaluation purposes this is a great deal and makes it not worth it to mess with time-limited trials. I am definitely going to purchase it.
    Friday, June 14, 2013 5:20 PM
  • Jason, I just realized I may have reported one of your posts as abusive by mistake (pressed wrong button) but nothing is displayed in red frame anymore, so I cannot be sure. I am really sorry if this is what happened. I tried to IM moderator but it doesn't seem this forum supports IM-s at all.

    Friday, June 14, 2013 6:09 PM
  • Heh.

    I had noticed a lot of your posts were being marked as abuse, figured someone was hitting it by accident...

    No big deal.

    :-)

    Jason


    Jason A.

    Friday, June 14, 2013 6:25 PM