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2008 Server Installation

    Question

  • I have been out of IT for a while (6 years) and am studying for the MCITP to get caught up.  I am having trouble with the installation on my server.  My ISO file isn't recognized by my dvd rom even though I've set the boot sequence correctly.  Ir simply will not mount,  I am reading Windows 2008 Inside/Out and there is a reference in there that states "Intels 64 bit systems do not support boot from a DVD ROM" and you have to boot from the EFI shell.  I have Xeon Processor in my server.  Is this correct?  Any idea why my ISO file isn't working?  Thanks a lot for your input.

    Michael T. Glenn

    Wednesday, February 29, 2012 5:35 PM

Answers

  • So Virtual PC 2007 is free.  VirtualBox is free too and support 64bit guests while Virtual PC 2007 can only do 32bit guests.  If you are going to install a 32 bit version of Server 2008, Virtual PC is good to go.  If you are going with a 64bit OS, then Virtual Box or VMWare is needed.

    For a test guest vm, you do not have to assign it too much RAM.  2008 32bit will run fine in a VM with 1 GB of RAM.  It should run about the same on your laptop or desktop system.  While its the only guest running, you can assign it 2GB of RAM to run better.  When you run multiple guests at the same time, you'll need to adjust the RAM so that you don't run out of resources.  

    Of course ultimately, if you can expand your desktop system, I would suggest running Windows 7 64 bit edition with as much RAM as you can afford so that you can build pretty large labs, all virtualized.  A host system running 16 GB of ram is not too costly and you can easily get 6-8 guest systems running at the same time.

    Today, we are very fortunate, 10-15 years ago, we had to build labs with physical hardware, a lot of multi-boot systems, and a lot of complexity and hassle.


    Guides and tutorials, visit ITGeared.com.

    itgeared.com facebook twitter youtube

    Wednesday, February 29, 2012 7:57 PM
  • I add that, as a tech, it's always handy to have a Server OS virtualized and on file with you.

    I saved a customer domain that way, it DC was starting to corrupt because of a fail disk on a cheap raid controller, so I plugged my USB fast with my OS on it, started it, dcpromo, and transfered all role of the domain on it in less than 1 hour. The best part was it runned on a secretary computer with the virtualization software for the time we did the repair and sell another server with all the OS updated on it.

    Virtualization come with great benefits


    MCP | MCTS 70-236: Exchange Server 2007, Configuring

    Thursday, March 01, 2012 8:10 PM

All replies

  • Did you burn the iso file, or the content of it ?

    MCP | MCTS 70-236: Exchange Server 2007, Configuring

    Wednesday, February 29, 2012 6:09 PM
  • Since you are in the process of testing and learning, I would suggest that you setup your host system with a desktop version (Windows 7 or XP) and install virtualization software such as Virtual PC 2007, VMWare, or VirtualBox.  Then install Windows 2008 Server as a VM guest (directly from the ISO, no burning needed).  This way, you can work with the VM (take snapshots in time, backup, restore, etc..) without modifying the host computer configuration.  In addition, if you have enough CPU power and RAM, you can have several VMs running at the same time.  In my opinion, this is the best approach for studying, learning, labs...


    How to Install Microsoft Windows Server 2008
    http://www.itgeared.com/articles/1003-how-to-install-windows-server-2008/
    Video: http://youtu.be/bdvt8ZprvG8

    Guides and tutorials, visit ITGeared.com.

    itgeared.com facebook twitter youtube

    Wednesday, February 29, 2012 6:36 PM
  • No i burned the ISO file.

    Michael T. Glenn

    Wednesday, February 29, 2012 7:12 PM
  • I am new to virtualization.  I have installed vitual machines like Vista and XP on my notebook when I was studying for the A+ Exam but I'm not quite sure how virtualization works on a i5 notebook with 4 GB of Ram running Server 2008?  Do i have to pay for Virtual PC 2007?  I have a regular PC with 4 GB on it and Windows 7?  Would it be better to run there?

    Michael T. Glenn

    Wednesday, February 29, 2012 7:22 PM
  • So Virtual PC 2007 is free.  VirtualBox is free too and support 64bit guests while Virtual PC 2007 can only do 32bit guests.  If you are going to install a 32 bit version of Server 2008, Virtual PC is good to go.  If you are going with a 64bit OS, then Virtual Box or VMWare is needed.

    For a test guest vm, you do not have to assign it too much RAM.  2008 32bit will run fine in a VM with 1 GB of RAM.  It should run about the same on your laptop or desktop system.  While its the only guest running, you can assign it 2GB of RAM to run better.  When you run multiple guests at the same time, you'll need to adjust the RAM so that you don't run out of resources.  

    Of course ultimately, if you can expand your desktop system, I would suggest running Windows 7 64 bit edition with as much RAM as you can afford so that you can build pretty large labs, all virtualized.  A host system running 16 GB of ram is not too costly and you can easily get 6-8 guest systems running at the same time.

    Today, we are very fortunate, 10-15 years ago, we had to build labs with physical hardware, a lot of multi-boot systems, and a lot of complexity and hassle.


    Guides and tutorials, visit ITGeared.com.

    itgeared.com facebook twitter youtube

    Wednesday, February 29, 2012 7:57 PM
  • The content of the iso is bootable. Burn it the other way and it will boot.

    The virtualisation step is a good idea too, if you plan to migrate someday go virtual. (if you plan esxi, go vmware server, if you plan hyper-v, go with virtual pc)


    MCP | MCTS 70-236: Exchange Server 2007, Configuring


    Wednesday, February 29, 2012 9:49 PM
  • So what about device drivers in virtualization?  Do my Windows 7 Device Drivers have to be Server 2008 compliant?

    Michael T. Glenn

    Thursday, March 01, 2012 4:55 PM
  • no, that is the best part about virtualization.  The devices on your Windows 7 box are not actually directly presented to the guest systems.  It is the virtualization software that presents the device to the guest OS.  There is no need to get specific device drivers.  The virtualization software will handle that for you.

    Guides and tutorials, visit ITGeared.com.

    itgeared.com facebook twitter youtube

    Thursday, March 01, 2012 5:01 PM
  • I add that, as a tech, it's always handy to have a Server OS virtualized and on file with you.

    I saved a customer domain that way, it DC was starting to corrupt because of a fail disk on a cheap raid controller, so I plugged my USB fast with my OS on it, started it, dcpromo, and transfered all role of the domain on it in less than 1 hour. The best part was it runned on a secretary computer with the virtualization software for the time we did the repair and sell another server with all the OS updated on it.

    Virtualization come with great benefits


    MCP | MCTS 70-236: Exchange Server 2007, Configuring

    Thursday, March 01, 2012 8:10 PM