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Automatic VS Automatic - Delayed as a startup-type for a service RRS feed

Answers

  • Hi,

    More information for your reference:

    Delayed start has two major components.

    1.Delayed services wait to start until all of the Automatic services have started

    2.Initially, the threads for delayed services are set to lowest priority.

    This greatly reduces the slowdown in responsiveness in user sessions that the services might otherwise cause, because their disk I/O, CPU time, and pace of allocating RAM all ramp up at a more gradual slope than they would otherwise. It helps to avoid the classic "type password then wait 2 minutes" login that we all hate after a fresh boot.

    It can also solve some problems if you have, for example, two high-I/O services. You can have one start automatically and the other delayed, or even both delayed, and they may start more smoothly than they would if both configured for Automatic start.

    At the moment, it's not really configurable. You can sort of configure chains of service starts by making setting one as dependent on another, even if they technically aren't, i.e. make service 3 dependent on service 2, which is dependent on service 1, then set service 1 to delayed, so they will start in the order 1, 2, 3, once all the Automatic services have started.

    Best Regards,

    Alvin Wang


    Please remember to mark the replies as answers if they help and un-mark them if they provide no help. If you have feedback for TechNet Subscriber Support, contact tnmff@microsoft.com.

    • Proposed as answer by Alvwan Monday, March 21, 2016 1:55 AM
    • Marked as answer by Alvwan Thursday, March 24, 2016 9:10 AM
    Wednesday, March 16, 2016 6:38 AM
  • Automatic : Use this setting to configure the service to automatically start during the boot and logon process.

    Automatic (Delayed Start) : Use this setting to configure the service to automatically start during the boot and logon process. The startup of the service is briefly delayed during the logon process to increase logon performance.

     

     

     


    Regards, Dave Patrick ....
    Microsoft Certified Professional
    Microsoft MVP [Windows Server]

    Disclaimer: This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties or guarantees , and confers no rights.

    • Proposed as answer by Dave PatrickMVP Monday, March 21, 2016 2:07 AM
    • Marked as answer by Alvwan Thursday, March 24, 2016 9:10 AM
    Tuesday, March 15, 2016 1:02 PM

All replies

  • Automatic : Use this setting to configure the service to automatically start during the boot and logon process.

    Automatic (Delayed Start) : Use this setting to configure the service to automatically start during the boot and logon process. The startup of the service is briefly delayed during the logon process to increase logon performance.

     

     

     


    Regards, Dave Patrick ....
    Microsoft Certified Professional
    Microsoft MVP [Windows Server]

    Disclaimer: This posting is provided "AS IS" with no warranties or guarantees , and confers no rights.

    • Proposed as answer by Dave PatrickMVP Monday, March 21, 2016 2:07 AM
    • Marked as answer by Alvwan Thursday, March 24, 2016 9:10 AM
    Tuesday, March 15, 2016 1:02 PM
  • Hi,

    More information for your reference:

    Delayed start has two major components.

    1.Delayed services wait to start until all of the Automatic services have started

    2.Initially, the threads for delayed services are set to lowest priority.

    This greatly reduces the slowdown in responsiveness in user sessions that the services might otherwise cause, because their disk I/O, CPU time, and pace of allocating RAM all ramp up at a more gradual slope than they would otherwise. It helps to avoid the classic "type password then wait 2 minutes" login that we all hate after a fresh boot.

    It can also solve some problems if you have, for example, two high-I/O services. You can have one start automatically and the other delayed, or even both delayed, and they may start more smoothly than they would if both configured for Automatic start.

    At the moment, it's not really configurable. You can sort of configure chains of service starts by making setting one as dependent on another, even if they technically aren't, i.e. make service 3 dependent on service 2, which is dependent on service 1, then set service 1 to delayed, so they will start in the order 1, 2, 3, once all the Automatic services have started.

    Best Regards,

    Alvin Wang


    Please remember to mark the replies as answers if they help and un-mark them if they provide no help. If you have feedback for TechNet Subscriber Support, contact tnmff@microsoft.com.

    • Proposed as answer by Alvwan Monday, March 21, 2016 1:55 AM
    • Marked as answer by Alvwan Thursday, March 24, 2016 9:10 AM
    Wednesday, March 16, 2016 6:38 AM
  • Hi,

    Just checking in to see if the information provided was helpful. Please let us know if you would like further assistance.

    Best Regards,

    Alvin Wang


    Please remember to mark the replies as answers if they help and un-mark them if they provide no help. If you have feedback for TechNet Subscriber Support, contact tnmff@microsoft.com.

    Friday, March 18, 2016 7:00 AM
  • Alvin, 

    I have another question for you. What would be the difference in changing a service type from Automatic (Delayed Start) back to Manual if it's already not starting automatically regularly and you don't need it to start all the time for something such as multimedia services or application update services (for things like Google Chrome) and don't want them to start because they are taking up unnecessary resources or causing boot lag time?

    Regards,

    Paul Liscom


    Monday, April 1, 2019 1:53 PM