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Restore a database with an In-memory filegroup on a General Purpose Azure SQL Managed Instance RRS feed

Answers

  • You could also simply drop these objects and attempt the migration to Azure SQL Managed Instance (link).

    Thanks,

    Mike

    Wednesday, July 17, 2019 2:00 PM
    Moderator

All replies

  • Hi, Juan,

    There are a set of local SSDs where much of the database has been cached with the physical .ldf/.mdf files being hosted on an LRS Storage account. When you perform the restore, the database copy is being taken from these physical files and no part of the cached items are included.

    With Premium and Business Critical service tiers, the entire database resides on the local SSDs and the entire database is written to a RA-GRS Storage instance. 

    Can you detail the source backup and the destination for the restore. Are these the same SQL Server instance or are these separate instances?


    Wednesday, July 3, 2019 12:56 AM
    Moderator
  • Hi Mike

    Thanks for reply. I have a database in an on-premise SQL Server 2014 with "In-Memory OLTP" enabled. This database has a Memory-Optimized FileGroup , but it does not have any In-Memory OLTP object (tables, table types, Natively compiled T-SQL modules,...  I dropped all of them). So, my question is: Can a backup of this database be restored on a General Purpose Azure SQL Managed Instance?

    Note: The Memory-Optimized FileGroup can not be deleted. This is a limitation of SQL Server =( see here


    Juan Pablo Burgos

    Wednesday, July 3, 2019 3:07 PM
  • Hi Juan,

    If this is an on-premise database (SQL Server) you can export this as a .bacpac file I believe and restore it to a Azure SQL Managed Instance deployment. Azure SQL Managed Instance will accept a .bak or .bacpac file.

    "A BACPAC is a Windows file with a .bacpac extension that encapsulates a database's schema and data. The primary use case for a BACPAC is to move a database from one server to another - or to migrate a database from a local server to the cloud - and archiving an existing database in an open format."

    Please let us know if you have additional questions or run into complications.

    Thank you,

    Mike 

    Friday, July 5, 2019 11:59 PM
    Moderator
  • The database has a big size (+3 TB). BACPAC file is not an option for me. Thanks

    Juan Pablo Burgos

    Monday, July 8, 2019 5:58 PM
  • Hi Juan,

    Thank you for this additional detail. I believe Azure SQL Hyperscale is the best solution for you (link).

    And you must do the following before performing the migration:

    Migration of databases with persistent in-memory objects Hyperscale only supports non persistent In-Memory objects (table types, native SPs and functions). Persistent In-Memory tables and other objects must be dropped and recreated as non-In-Memory objects before migrating a database to the Hyperscale service tier.

    Tuesday, July 16, 2019 12:10 AM
    Moderator
  • You could also simply drop these objects and attempt the migration to Azure SQL Managed Instance (link).

    Thanks,

    Mike

    Wednesday, July 17, 2019 2:00 PM
    Moderator