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Group Policy Prefences - Ever seen issues where policies never get applied with "Apply once and do not reapply"?

    Question

  • I need to deliver a file to all my computers, but that file will then need to be updated in the future.  I just need to make sure that the file never gets reverted back to the original file that I am delivering.

    I know about the CRUD options and know that it is safer to use CREATE than UPDATE and safer to use UPDATE than REPLACE, when it comes to delivering files and allowing for those files to be changed in the future. I did some testing and UPDATE seems to deliver the files, but then not overwrite the newer changes on the file down the road because this policy needs to continue to be applied and all computers need to continue to be in scope.

    In the past I have typically told the preference item to "APPLY ONCE AND DO NOT REAPPLY" but it seems like I have seen a handful of computers before where they never got the file, until I turned that setting off.

    So this question is do you guys think I am safe using the UPDATE option and counting on it not reapplying the change? or has anyone ever seen any problems that pop might occur from the "apply once and do not reapply"?  Ideally, I would rather use that unless it causes a 2-3% failure rate.


    Dave





    Tuesday, July 7, 2015 5:05 PM

Answers

  • Since I disencourage the usage of GPP files anyway, I'm not sure if I
    should answer at all :) Better use a short batch and leverage the
    sophisticated options robocopy offers...
     
    Nevertheless:
     
    > So this question is do you guys think I am safe using the UPDATE option
    > and counting on it not reapplying the change? or has anyone ever seen
    > any problems that pop might occur from the "apply once and do not
    > reapply"?
     
    This "Update" mode for files is one of the most misunderstood settings
    I've ever seen. And it is badly explained, too.
     
    "Update" only means that the additional settings for the file (these two
    or three attributes) are re-written. If the file itself already exists,
    it will never be overwritten, regardless what happens to the source file.
     
    To sum up: As long as you don't care of the file attributes, update is
    identical to create.
     

    Greetings/Grüße, Martin

    Mal ein gutes Buch über GPOs lesen?
    Good or bad GPOs? - my blog…
    And if IT bothers me - coke bottle design refreshment (-:
    • Marked as answer by DaveBryan37 Thursday, July 9, 2015 5:11 AM
    Wednesday, July 8, 2015 1:43 PM

All replies

  • Since I disencourage the usage of GPP files anyway, I'm not sure if I
    should answer at all :) Better use a short batch and leverage the
    sophisticated options robocopy offers...
     
    Nevertheless:
     
    > So this question is do you guys think I am safe using the UPDATE option
    > and counting on it not reapplying the change? or has anyone ever seen
    > any problems that pop might occur from the "apply once and do not
    > reapply"?
     
    This "Update" mode for files is one of the most misunderstood settings
    I've ever seen. And it is badly explained, too.
     
    "Update" only means that the additional settings for the file (these two
    or three attributes) are re-written. If the file itself already exists,
    it will never be overwritten, regardless what happens to the source file.
     
    To sum up: As long as you don't care of the file attributes, update is
    identical to create.
     

    Greetings/Grüße, Martin

    Mal ein gutes Buch über GPOs lesen?
    Good or bad GPOs? - my blog…
    And if IT bothers me - coke bottle design refreshment (-:
    • Marked as answer by DaveBryan37 Thursday, July 9, 2015 5:11 AM
    Wednesday, July 8, 2015 1:43 PM
  • Thanks Martin.  Those details are always priceless.  I use robocopy all the time and have been using batch scripts until I just changed to GPP files recently.  Just wondering, but why do you discourage the use of GPP files?

    Dave


    Thursday, July 9, 2015 5:13 AM
  • > Just wondering, but why do you discourage the use of
    > GPP files?
     
    a) Your issue - it cannot "update" files
    b) It is synchronous - it blocks the computer until it's finished
    c) No subdirectories, no useful wildcards
    d) No logging what was processed, what failed and why
    e) It can only run at startup/logon, not at logoff/shutdown or in the
    background at any time (like a task)
     
    Mainly b) is my concern. I want fast startup and logon, so I avoid
    synchronous processing where possible.
     

    Greetings/Grüße, Martin

    Mal ein gutes Buch über GPOs lesen?
    Good or bad GPOs? - my blog…
    And if IT bothers me - coke bottle design refreshment (-:
    Thursday, July 9, 2015 10:56 AM