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Preventing Windows 10 automatic reboots (Windows Updates) RRS feed

  • Question

  • This is an old, devastating issue but still unresolved by Microsoft. How do you stop Windows 10 updates from rebooting without permission? I have lost a lot of work over the last year when it reboots without my permission and any data being worked on is lost forever. As a power user my workstation is on 24x7. Either I'm working around the clock or the computer is processing a job. I do not want it to reboot without my permission.

    I've tried changing the group policy and registry settings but they don't work and nothing stops Win10 from rebooting when it wants to.

    Microsoft - PLEASE go back to how updates were handled in Windows 7. Users and admins are in charge of their computers, not you. What is the point in using Win10 if it's capable of destroying hours of work by rebooting when it feels like it? A schedule is not good enough as I don't know when the computer won't be in use and if all open files have been saved. This is a major flaw in Win10 and no argument I've read can justify what it does. We won't be upgrading any other workstations to Win10, that's for sure.

    Is there a proper solution please?


    • Edited by gary_dps Sunday, August 28, 2016 12:31 PM
    Sunday, August 28, 2016 11:35 AM

Answers

  • Do not forget to check frequently; otherwise you will not receive any updates.  I check every "Patch Tuesday", when I read of new updates plus at least once a week.  If there are no updates, it takes only a minute.

    Large corporations operate differently. I worked at a very large corporation where the local IT people controlled all changes to Windows.  Windows Update was not used at all.

    Small organizations have the most difficulty with the updates. Typically, they are too small for "enterprise" licenses and treatment and do not have full time IT folks that do nothing but take care of the PC networks.    

    Tuesday, August 30, 2016 8:27 PM

All replies

  • In the latest build of Windows 10 , which is 1607, you may set the time for restart and don't restart in the time you specify.
    Sunday, August 28, 2016 2:27 PM
  • Yes, I know the restart can be scheduled but Microsoft don't understand how some people use their computers. Some workstations are in use 24x7 (think of shift workers) or just incredibly hard working people doing up to 18 hours a day at different times, or people running heavy processing tasks such as 3D rendering, molecular or protein computations. etc. For all these people it's not possible to provide a date and time when they know for certain that their workstation won't be in use, when all unsaved data will be saved, and when it's convenient to reboot the computer.

    e.g. yesterday I thought I'd be finished by 2am but something urgent occurred so I had to continue working until 4am. If I had scheduled the reboot for 3am it would have killed all my unsaved data and prevented me from working on the urgent issue. How would I have remembered the reboot is scheduled for 3am when I have important work related issues to deal with? A schedule is as bad as a random reboot.

    The computer must ask me if it's okay to reboot now. I should be able to say no, ask me later. The computer must wait and ask me later. I'm the boss, it must wait for my permission when I've saved my work and I am ready. Why can't Microsoft understand that?

    Sunday, August 28, 2016 6:38 PM
  • Hi,

    Yes, I understand your meaning.

    If we make a scheduler in advance but we can’t let computer restarts itself on that time for some reasons, computer will just give us a prompt to save work and restart itself  automatically.

    Please understand, this behavior is by design, we can’t change it. What we can do now is scheduling an ample time for restart, you can feedback your demand to Microsoft by built-in Feedback app, maybe this feature can be improved in future.

    Sincere regards


    Please remember to mark the replies as an answers if they help and unmark them if they provide no help.
    If you have feedback for TechNet Subscriber Support, contact tnmff@microsoft.com.

    Monday, August 29, 2016 6:40 AM
  • Terrible answer. I just lost days of debugging work because windows decided to reboot.

    They are forcing "creators" to another platform with this kind of behavior. 

    Monday, August 29, 2016 8:55 PM
  • Mark the connection as metered so updates are not downloaded so no reboot.  When time permits mark the connection as un-metered and do the updates.

    Microsoft is very adamant about their position when I have brought it up in meetings.


    Wanikiya and Dyami--Team Zigzag Windows IT-PRO (MS-MVP)

    Monday, August 29, 2016 9:26 PM
  • I share your view of auto rebooting.  I control mine by just disabling Automatic Update in gpedit.  (Yes, it still works with the new 1607 version. I hope MS does not get any more bright ideas and disable this setting too.)  I use Windows Update frequently.  I just don't like the "Automatic" part of it.  I have been disabling for as long as I can remember and MS has been showing "not recommended" for my setting for just as long.

    Here is a view of the setting:

        
    • Edited by Whisper2 Monday, August 29, 2016 10:50 PM
    Monday, August 29, 2016 10:49 PM
  • @Whisper2, thanks for this alternative option. But how do you force Windows to update when you are ready for it to do so?
    Monday, August 29, 2016 11:13 PM
  • I pinned Win Update to my Start Menu.  I just click it and then click check for updates.  Win Update then checks  for anything applicable, and if there is, it downloads and installs.  If a restart is necessary, it gives me several choices, but I select "Restart Now" and then I am done without any aggravation or interruptions. 

    Monday, August 29, 2016 11:36 PM
  • Thanks, I like your suggestion and have implemented it. :-)

    For a single user this is manageable, but I have no idea how a corporate organisation can deal with this destructive behaviour of Win10 which kills hours of work. More people I know are buying Macs, that pains me a lot since it's an expensive alternative so I usually argue against that. But can I really recommend they use a computer that reboots without permission and loses their work? No, that wouldn't make me a good advisor or friend.

    Tuesday, August 30, 2016 12:25 AM
  • Do not forget to check frequently; otherwise you will not receive any updates.  I check every "Patch Tuesday", when I read of new updates plus at least once a week.  If there are no updates, it takes only a minute.

    Large corporations operate differently. I worked at a very large corporation where the local IT people controlled all changes to Windows.  Windows Update was not used at all.

    Small organizations have the most difficulty with the updates. Typically, they are too small for "enterprise" licenses and treatment and do not have full time IT folks that do nothing but take care of the PC networks.    

    Tuesday, August 30, 2016 8:27 PM
  • This is another method that may work........I made a post in another thread and am awaiting confirmation.

    1) control panel

    2) administrative tools

    3) task scheduler

    4) expand task scheduler library in the left pane

    5) expand Microsoft

    6) expand windows

    7) click update orchestrator

    8) on the middle pane right click reboot

    9) click disable

    Thursday, October 20, 2016 8:39 AM
  • MS engineers and product managers are idiots that don't care that their idiotic hamfisted methods are negatively impacting users. There should obviously be an option for users who have enough sense to restart the damn computer at an appropriate time of our choosing.
    Friday, October 28, 2016 4:52 AM
  • Are you kidding?

    Forced restart of operating system with the feature of losing all your unsaved data is by design?!

    No. You must be wrong. Any sane software producer wouldn't do that to its users by design.

    Friday, April 7, 2017 8:06 AM