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DHCP Super Scope Question RRS feed

  • Question

  • Hi, I have added an additional superscope into my Windows 2008 DHCP server however not sure on what my next steps are making sure that this new DHCP superscope is being released to my DHCP clients. I googled this and found a lot of things on what my next steps are but still left clueless on what exactly to do. Can someone please advise. Cheers mates - DB  

    Saturday, January 14, 2012 6:46 AM

Answers

  • Hmm, that's a tough one, because we don't know what you currently have, what subnets you have (are the ranges in sequence?), which ones were pulled into the superscope, how many routers, are there DHCP relay agents or IP Helpers on the routers, are the other subnets VLANs?

    I may have missed one or two, but generally everything pretty much stays the same, whatever mask you're using on the current subnets, stays the same, and they are recommended to be in sequence or at least fall into the mask's range, such as if the ranges were a /27 (255.255.255.224), the ranges would be

    • 192.168.1.0 - 192.168.1.31
    • 192.168.1.32 - 192.168.1.63
    • 192.168.1.64 - 192.168.1.95
    • etc

    I thought the second link I posted kind of explained it well? Such as the following diagram?

     

    Superscope for routed DHCP server

     

     

    Or maybe superscopes may not have been the right solution for your scenario? IN many cases where I've seen admins consider superscopes, they've found it was just simple to keep separate scopes, one for each subnet with a DHCP Relay Agent or IP Helper.

     

    Ace

     


    Ace Fekay
    MVP, MCT, MCITP Enterprise Administrator, MCTS Windows 2008 & Exchange 2007 & Exchange 2010, Exchange 2010 Enterprise Administrator, MCSE & MCSA 2003/2000, MCSA Messaging 2003
    Microsoft Certified Trainer
    Microsoft MVP - Directory Services
    Complete List of Technical Blogs: http://www.delawarecountycomputerconsulting.com/technicalblogs.php

    This posting is provided AS-IS with no warranties or guarantees and confers no rights.

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    Sunday, January 15, 2012 6:20 AM
  • After creating the superscope using those two subnets, create an IP Helper on the Cisco router pointing to your Windows 2008 DHCP server.

    IOS 12.2 - Configure IP Helper
    http://www.cisco.com/en/US/docs/ios/12_2/ip/configuration/guide/1cfipadr.html#wp1003473

    Or consult your Cisco docs or Cisco support for additional help.

    Ace

     


    Ace Fekay
    MVP, MCT, MCITP Enterprise Administrator, MCTS Windows 2008 & Exchange 2007 & Exchange 2010, Exchange 2010 Enterprise Administrator, MCSE & MCSA 2003/2000, MCSA Messaging 2003
    Microsoft Certified Trainer
    Microsoft MVP - Directory Services
    Complete List of Technical Blogs: http://www.delawarecountycomputerconsulting.com/technicalblogs.php

    This posting is provided AS-IS with no warranties or guarantees and confers no rights.

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    Wednesday, January 18, 2012 5:06 PM

All replies

  • I think i didn't understand what exactly you want to do.

    However, here is a good step-by-step guide about how to create a superscope:

    http://www.techrepublic.com/article/create-a-superscope-to-solve-the-problem-of-dwindling-ip-addresses/6131003


    Regards, Liran.
    Saturday, January 14, 2012 10:05 AM
  • I'm not exactly following what you're asking, too. Can you provide a step by step of what you've already done, and what the next steps that you're stuck at, please?

    If not able to do that, maybe Liran.a's link with that step by step may help. Here are additional links:

    Superscopes
    General Technical Info
    http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc958938.aspx

    Configuring a DHCP Superscope
    Applies to Windows 2008 R2
    http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd759168.aspx

     

    Ace


    Ace Fekay
    MVP, MCT, MCITP Enterprise Administrator, MCTS Windows 2008 & Exchange 2007 & Exchange 2010, Exchange 2010 Enterprise Administrator, MCSE & MCSA 2003/2000, MCSA Messaging 2003
    Microsoft Certified Trainer
    Microsoft MVP - Directory Services
    Complete List of Technical Blogs: http://www.delawarecountycomputerconsulting.com/technicalblogs.php

    This posting is provided AS-IS with no warranties or guarantees and confers no rights.

    FaceBook Twitter LinkedIn
    Saturday, January 14, 2012 6:36 PM
  • What I meant was after setting up my superscope in my windows dhcp server, do I have to configure any of my routers in order for my new scope to be recognized/browse the network as normal?

    I've already created my scope in my dhcp and activated it so what's my next step from there? Do I also need to configure my tcp/ip in my dhcp server? do I need to create new interfaces in my router? do I need to allow my new scope to flow traffic in my firewall?

    Seeking guidance por favor...

    Cheers - DB

    Sunday, January 15, 2012 5:02 AM
  • Hmm, that's a tough one, because we don't know what you currently have, what subnets you have (are the ranges in sequence?), which ones were pulled into the superscope, how many routers, are there DHCP relay agents or IP Helpers on the routers, are the other subnets VLANs?

    I may have missed one or two, but generally everything pretty much stays the same, whatever mask you're using on the current subnets, stays the same, and they are recommended to be in sequence or at least fall into the mask's range, such as if the ranges were a /27 (255.255.255.224), the ranges would be

    • 192.168.1.0 - 192.168.1.31
    • 192.168.1.32 - 192.168.1.63
    • 192.168.1.64 - 192.168.1.95
    • etc

    I thought the second link I posted kind of explained it well? Such as the following diagram?

     

    Superscope for routed DHCP server

     

     

    Or maybe superscopes may not have been the right solution for your scenario? IN many cases where I've seen admins consider superscopes, they've found it was just simple to keep separate scopes, one for each subnet with a DHCP Relay Agent or IP Helper.

     

    Ace

     


    Ace Fekay
    MVP, MCT, MCITP Enterprise Administrator, MCTS Windows 2008 & Exchange 2007 & Exchange 2010, Exchange 2010 Enterprise Administrator, MCSE & MCSA 2003/2000, MCSA Messaging 2003
    Microsoft Certified Trainer
    Microsoft MVP - Directory Services
    Complete List of Technical Blogs: http://www.delawarecountycomputerconsulting.com/technicalblogs.php

    This posting is provided AS-IS with no warranties or guarantees and confers no rights.

    FaceBook Twitter LinkedIn
    Sunday, January 15, 2012 6:20 AM
  • So if you would've done it, after creating the DHCP superscope now considering you have one scope which was your current/primary then the new one you just created which you need to have new clients discover in your network....

    1st scope: 10.1.1.0/24 (current)

    2nd scope: 10.1.2.0/24 (new)

    Also considering you have only the following equipment to achieve DHCP superscope:

    1 cisco router

    2 48 port cisco switch

    1 windows server 2008 which is hosting your DHCP role

    So how would you configure it?

    Cheers - DB

    Wednesday, January 18, 2012 7:00 AM
  • After creating the superscope using those two subnets, create an IP Helper on the Cisco router pointing to your Windows 2008 DHCP server.

    IOS 12.2 - Configure IP Helper
    http://www.cisco.com/en/US/docs/ios/12_2/ip/configuration/guide/1cfipadr.html#wp1003473

    Or consult your Cisco docs or Cisco support for additional help.

    Ace

     


    Ace Fekay
    MVP, MCT, MCITP Enterprise Administrator, MCTS Windows 2008 & Exchange 2007 & Exchange 2010, Exchange 2010 Enterprise Administrator, MCSE & MCSA 2003/2000, MCSA Messaging 2003
    Microsoft Certified Trainer
    Microsoft MVP - Directory Services
    Complete List of Technical Blogs: http://www.delawarecountycomputerconsulting.com/technicalblogs.php

    This posting is provided AS-IS with no warranties or guarantees and confers no rights.

    FaceBook Twitter LinkedIn
    Wednesday, January 18, 2012 5:06 PM