none
JPG file opens fine on server and fine in Google Chrome but Upside Down in IE11 RRS feed

  • Question

  • We have a jpg file that is on a server. When you link directly to the file so that there is no HTML or CSS code, it opens fine in Google Chrome but IE is flipping it upside down.  I have access to the server itself, the computer with the jpg file on it, and when I open it in file explorer (not internet explorer) it opens in the default picture view program just fine.  The picture was taken with an iPhone.  Is there a way to disable this unwanted picture flipping in IE?

    Tuesday, January 13, 2015 10:01 PM

Answers

  • In Windows try right clicking on an iPhone photo and selecting Properties -> Details Tab.

    Scroll through the list of EXIF metadata.

    Now open the same photo in a decent EXIF viewer and see how much extra EXIF metadata is presented.

    The image below highlights one piece of metadata not exposed by Windows - orientation.

    To avoid problems try deleting all but the most basic metadata. See for example

    http://www.makeuseof.com/tag/3-ways-to-remove-exif-metadata-from-photos-and-why-you-might-want-to/

    Wednesday, January 14, 2015 2:29 AM
  • Hi GoodJBoy,

    Thanks for mystified’s reply and the solution should works.

    As the solution mystified mentioned, When you check out the Exif data of an image, it may just tell you the image orientation is "top-left" or otherwise. This is made easy to understand with a red dot in the diagrams. A red dot represents a point where the first column and the first row of an image intersect.

    If you view photos using an app supporting the Exif orientation, the app displays the photos properly by auto rotating them based on their orientation tag. But if you view photos in an application, such as Internet Explorer, that does not support the Exif orientation, you will notice that some photos are turned either upside down or sideways.

    Regards


    Thursday, January 15, 2015 9:57 AM
    Moderator

All replies

  • In Windows try right clicking on an iPhone photo and selecting Properties -> Details Tab.

    Scroll through the list of EXIF metadata.

    Now open the same photo in a decent EXIF viewer and see how much extra EXIF metadata is presented.

    The image below highlights one piece of metadata not exposed by Windows - orientation.

    To avoid problems try deleting all but the most basic metadata. See for example

    http://www.makeuseof.com/tag/3-ways-to-remove-exif-metadata-from-photos-and-why-you-might-want-to/

    Wednesday, January 14, 2015 2:29 AM
  • Hi GoodJBoy,

    Thanks for mystified’s reply and the solution should works.

    As the solution mystified mentioned, When you check out the Exif data of an image, it may just tell you the image orientation is "top-left" or otherwise. This is made easy to understand with a red dot in the diagrams. A red dot represents a point where the first column and the first row of an image intersect.

    If you view photos using an app supporting the Exif orientation, the app displays the photos properly by auto rotating them based on their orientation tag. But if you view photos in an application, such as Internet Explorer, that does not support the Exif orientation, you will notice that some photos are turned either upside down or sideways.

    Regards


    Thursday, January 15, 2015 9:57 AM
    Moderator