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prevent column break RRS feed

  • Question

  • I want to print out the outline of a document in several columns, but find that these columns break whenever they feel like it, often where I do not want them to.  Is there any way to PREVENT Word from breaking a column?  (I cannot see that a Column Break has been entered.)


    jwixson

    Saturday, May 25, 2013 10:59 PM

Answers

  • You can use the paragraph attributes "Keep Together" and "Keep with Next" to prevent line breaks in the middle of a paragraph or between more than one paragraph. But both will leave large blank spaces at the bottom of the previous column by forcing those paragraphs into the new column.

    Is that what you are looking for?

    If not, take a look a this collection of tips that describe ways of forcing text to fit into a specific page (column) size.  But using these techniques in a document that is still be edited will require constant manual intervention.

    http://sdrv.ms/VSnvw6

    • Marked as answer by Max Meng Wednesday, June 5, 2013 6:34 AM
    Sunday, May 26, 2013 8:29 AM

All replies

  • You can use the paragraph attributes "Keep Together" and "Keep with Next" to prevent line breaks in the middle of a paragraph or between more than one paragraph. But both will leave large blank spaces at the bottom of the previous column by forcing those paragraphs into the new column.

    Is that what you are looking for?

    If not, take a look a this collection of tips that describe ways of forcing text to fit into a specific page (column) size.  But using these techniques in a document that is still be edited will require constant manual intervention.

    http://sdrv.ms/VSnvw6

    • Marked as answer by Max Meng Wednesday, June 5, 2013 6:34 AM
    Sunday, May 26, 2013 8:29 AM
  • Ron,

    thank you very much!  I simply removed the Keep Together and Widow & Orphan, and the breaks went away.  Very timely.  And what a good article you pointed: full of interesting info and tips.  I have no idea how you find such stuff, but glad that you do.  (You must be a pro - I am just a user and want to stay that way.)

    A brief essay: Microsoft is zero help in matters like this - I wasted far too much time going to Tech Support, explaining the problem (repeatedly), even going to supervisors - but, as they explain, they "just fix it, don't use it" and don't know much about usability issues.  Understandable, but frustrating.  When I enquired (from Tech Net) how I might find out about usage conventions, the best they could come up with was that I could "take a course."  (No guarantee there, either.)

    I am glad that there is a forum and readers like you, though I feel that MS has turned this matter over to users. (Who else could get away with that?)  But I continue to have small questions about big issues for me, such as how my Word2010 got switched so that every time I click the Home tab, then an icon, the Home menu bar goes away - this is especially annoying, since (i.a.) I cannot double-click the Format Painter.  Word did not come that way - but I do not know what arcane command turns "leave the Home menu bar displayed" back on again.

    I add that I am not reluctant to pay for help, I just do not know where to look for somewhat with whom I can have ongoing contact to answer small questions quickly and affordably.  A new industry since MS stopped putting out user manuals!

    Again, thanks and kudos!  - jw


    jwixson

    Sunday, May 26, 2013 6:44 PM
  • Glad that worked out for you.

    You are right, there are so MANY quirks and hidden features.  There are people on this forum who I would bow down low to, they are that much more knowledgeable than I am ...

    I agree, MS has abandoned it's support of users with problems.

    The home tab is probably a simple fix. I think you are describing the "Minimized" mode.  I use the <CTL><F1> combo to toggle that mode on and off. If you don't like keyboard, using the mouse there is tiny hieroglyph (icon) just to the left of the blue circle with question mark (Help) icon on the right end of the ribbon. Clicking on that stylized arrow will toggle hidden ribbon on and off. You can also double or tripple click on any tab to toggle hidden mode on and off.

    You can ask your "small" questions here, or in this other similar forum:

    http://answers.microsoft.com/en-us/office/forum?tab=all

    Actually, I think Answers is more active, with more repliers for Word questions.

    Sunday, May 26, 2013 7:29 PM
  • You can ask your "small" questions here, or in this other similar forum:

    http://answers.microsoft.com/en-us/office/forum?tab=all

    Actually, I think Answers is more active, with more repliers for Word questions.



    The Microsoft Community, formerly Answers, is certainly more active. I would say it deals with everyday questions rather than "small" questions, though. :-)

    Stefan Blom, Microsoft Word MVP
    Sunday, May 26, 2013 10:11 PM
  • Ron,

    thank you for the useful answer, which (of course) worked.  May you gain points in heaven!  As to the "minimized mode," this is the first i'd heard of it - and makes me wonder what host of other features awaits my inadvertent discovery.  (How are we supposed to know - how did you learn?)

    As to Answers (thanks to Stefan, too), I looked there after learning about it, but saw nothing of use for my question.  Possibly if I had posted my question there, some other good reader might have answered me (tho he could not have done better).

    When I say "saw nothing of use," I refer to the swamp of hits I got when I searched; it appears that the string-parser ORs my search phrase, giving me a huge amount of useless and irrelevant responses to sort through.  This mispractice resembles BING, which will even OR the words which I AND together, in its eagerness to provide quantity instead of quality.

    I continue to wonder why we have to guess how Word (or Office or Windows) works - while MS elves are busy churning out new features and interfaces - do they ever consider who uses them?  I have long thought about an easy solution (tho it was turned down explicitly by Bill Gates): why not simply list every command (and feature and shortcut) on a help website, with an explanation, example and commentary?  Such a super help file could be hyperlinked to provide overviewability and ease of access, and maintained and improved by users as they discover more wrinkles/bugs.  (It should be monitored by someone who really knows the product.)

    But i'm not going to hold my breath - someone/something seems to prefer confusion, uncertainty and ambiguity in MicroSpace (as well as in politics), so any solutions will have to come from USERS.  (Tho see how well Wikipedia caught on!)  Meantime, we must look to the kindness of strangers for help (as we dangle, twisting).  So, thank you for that!  jw


    jwixson

    Monday, May 27, 2013 4:53 PM
  • What you can do is ask a new question in the Microsoft Community. Searching, as you have noticed, is more or less useless. Actually, googling for a relevant set of keywords, adding site:answers.microsoft.com/en-us/ is more helpful.
     
    The search function in the Community needs fixing. It's the same with searching Microsoft support (or help files). :-(

    Stefan Blom, Microsoft Word MVP
    Monday, May 27, 2013 5:21 PM
  • You're welcome. But there is no "of course" about replies working. The suggestions are hit or miss since we are actually not looking at your computer. That is why we have the "propose as answer" feature here, so others know what actually worked for you.


    I agree with the observation that searching the site is an exercise in futility. Bing definitely is the search engine. But, searching is worth trying. 


    I also agree with Stefan that googling the site: seems to return better hits.


    I learned about the Ribbon minimize feature on the Answers forum, after using the ribbon for about 4 years!  It was a real headslap, "d'Oh!" moment.  If they had publicized that feature with the release of 2007 it would have addressed one large complaint about the ribbon. That it wastes too much space on the screen compared to the menu.


    Listing every (or almost every) command and feature has been done. It is a LONG  list. Off the top of my head I thing for Word it is over 10,000 entries ...

    MS did just that for Office 2007 and 2010, I haven't seen it for 2013 yet so you can make do with the 2010 version for now, it will be ~99% correct:

    Map 2003 menu to 2010 Ribbon Silverlight applets and spreadsheets- https://office.microsoft.com/en-us/support/learn-where-menu-and-toolbar-commands-are-in-office-2010-and-related-products-HA101794130.aspx?CTT=3 – Another way of finding “lost” commands

     

    I just watched the video on this page:

    http://blogs.msdn.com/b/jensenh/archive/2008/03/12/the-story-of-the-ribbon.aspx

    It's just under 1.5 hours. I found it quite informative. It explains a lot of the (ir)rational behind the Ribbon design, including the name by the Manager in charge of it's development (not that I agree with it all...).  The slides download just don't tell the story.

    MS also produced this "unofficial" (the tools produced by the Lab are not considered officially supported products by MS. It is too bad, I think this tool should be shipped with the product by default!) "Search command" addon for 2007 and 2010. It is a really good addon, but it took them well over a year to come out with the 2010 version. I hope they are faster with the 2013 version.

     

    2010 / 2007 Search Command Addon www.officelabs.com/projects/searchcommands/Pages/default.aspx

    Here is a 3rd party version of the list for 3 ribbon products:

    Office Watch Word/Excel Command Finder -

    The Office watch command finders are really good tools, they actually provide a more focused result, but the path it describes is sometimes wrong. (They got all of the info from MS ...). They have also added some commands that are not on the “official” MS command list.

     

    http://office-watch.com/commandlist/Word_2010.aspx  Word 2010 Command Finder

    http://office-watch.com/t/n.aspx?a=1558 - Word 2010 Command Finder Description

    http://office-watch.com/t/n.aspx?a=1569&z=0 - 2010 Command Finder improvements

    http://office-watch.com/commandlist/Word_2007.aspx  Word 2007 Command Finder

    http://office-watch.com/commandlist/Excel_2007.aspx - Excel 2007 Command Finder

     

    You can add the link to OWW Command Finder tool to the Word QAT using this macro:

    Public Sub command_finder()

    ' Ed Weber

    ' Call the Office Watch Command List applet

    ' Equivalent to the Search Tab addon

    '

        ActiveDocument.FollowHyperlink _

        Address:=" http://office-watch.com/commandlist/Word_2010.aspx", _

        NewWindow:=True, AddHistory:=False

    End Sub

     

    This is the macro you need for Excel

    Private Declare Function ShellExecute Lib "shell32.dll" Alias "ShellExecuteA" _

        (ByVal hwnd As Long, ByVal lpOperation As String, ByVal lpFile As String, ByVal _

        lpParameters As String, ByVal lpDirectory As String, ByVal nShowCmd As Long) As Long

     

    Sub command_finder_2007()

    ' Launches a webpage.

    '

        Dim strURL As String

       

        strURL = "http://office-watch.com/commandlist/Excel_2007.aspx"

       

         'Navigate to the address...

        On Error Resume Next

        ShellExecute 0&, vbNullString, strURL, vbNullString, vbNullString, 3 'SW_SHOWNORMAL

     

    End Sub

     

    Learning the Ribbon Links

    A key point to keep in mind is that from the point of view of the "Average User", Office 2007 and 2010 and 2013 are 99% identical. Tips specific to 2007 almost always are still valid in 2010 and 2013 apps so don't automatically ignore tips and articles that were created for 2007 or 2010 (and even for menu versions of the tips. The underlying concepts are the same, you just have to adjust for changes to the UI from menu to ribbon!).

    This next link is one of the best resources I’ve looked at for getting you into the right frame of mind for learning and using the ribbon gooey.

    Stop Clicking and Exploring Excel 2007 like a Newbie - http://www.scribd.com/doc/29093109/Stop-Clicking-Exploring-Excel-Ribbon-Like-Newbie - applies to any Ribbonized app. This is an excellent booklet to get people into the right frame of mind to learn and use ANYribbonized app.

    12 Steps to become awesome in Excel (and your work) in 2012 - http://chandoo.org/wp/2012/01/06/12-ways-to-learn-excel/ - although this tip is identified as being specific to Excel, it applies to any software (ruined by ribbonization or not), and life in general.

    http://www.askvg.com/download-free-microsoft-office-2010-getting-started-screensaver-for-windows-7/

     

    Download a free screensaver from MS that presents short video tips. New tips constantly downloaded from a MS RSS feed.

    Good site, lots of good tips. Their newsletter is worth signing up for.

     

    Jensen Harris: An Office User Interface Blog

    This one can be used to find answers to the inevitable question: "why did stupid MS do this, that or the other stupid thing in the stupid ribbon':

    Original source:  http://pschmid.net/blog/2006/10/09/58 

    alternate source http://blogs.msdn.com/b/jensenh/archive/2008/03/12/table-of-contents.aspx 

         This is an organized Table Of Contents to a large collection of links to MS Dev Team Blogs about the design and building of the 2007 ribbon. A LOT of reading, but interesting to understand the underlying (il)logic of the Ribbon

    2007/2010 Getting Started Tab addin Download

    The optional “Get Started” addin also has a button to the “Interactive Word 2003 to Word 2007 Command Reference Guide”, but this button activates an internet link to the MS website.  Personally, I prefer using the downloaded flash applet.  Note: I have had problems trying to run the online version on FireFox, it worked fine in IE.

    https://office.microsoft.com/en-us/training/download-help-to-get-started-with-office-2007-HA010214685.aspx?pid=CL100788241033

    This download adds a Get Started tab to the end of the Word 2007 Ribbon. Commands on this tab give you easy access to free content on Office Online, such as training courses, video demos, and other Office Online content designed to help you learn Word 2007 quickly. An Office Online interactive command mapping tool, also available on the Get Started tab, shows you where to find Word 2003 buttons and commands are in Word 2007. Office Online Community discussions are also available directly from Word with this add-in.

     

    Ribbon Hero  - http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/help/be-ribbon-hero-and-have-fun-doing-it-HA010390372.aspx  A learning game that guides you through various Office features.

    Ribbon Hero 2: Clippy’s Second Chance -  http://www.ribbonhero.com/news.html  New version of the learning game.

     

    Office 2010 Getting Started resources downloads page- Articles, interactive guides and guidance to help you be more productive with Office 2010 more quickly. - http://www.microsoft.com/download/en/details.aspx?id=17339

     

    2010 Migration Guides - https://office.microsoft.com/en-us/excel-help/office-2010-migration-guides-HA101982272.aspx

     

    3 ways to learn the Office 2010 ribbon\ http://blogs.office.com/b/office-education/archive/2011/01/10/3-ways-to-learn-the-Office-2010-ribbon.aspx

     

    10+ ways to help your users transition to Word 2007 http://blogs.techrepublic.com.com/10things/?p=407

     

    10+ ways to train your users on Office 2007 for free http://blogs.techrepublic.com.com/msoffice/?p=144

     

    Word 2010 / 2007 Free Tutorial - http://www.wordtutorial.net/

     

    Mini-glossary: Office 2007 terms you should know - http://articles.techrepublic.com.com/5100-10878_11-6180692.html

     

    10 new Office 2007 interface elements (and what most of them are really called) http://blogs.techrepublic.com.com/msoffice/?p=139

     

    Dictionary of Windows UI terms - http://www.askvg.com/complete-guide-for-windows-customization-terms-and-resources/


    • Edited by Rohn007MVP Monday, May 27, 2013 6:01 PM
    Monday, May 27, 2013 5:58 PM