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Can OEM Vista 32bit be upgraded to Win7 64bit ? RRS feed

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  • Egads

    (1)   The only 64-bit flavor of Vista is Ultimate-64.


    You still, have the same habit of taking comments out of context.

    If you quote that entire paragraph, it says this:

    "How do I get a 64-bit copy of Windows 7?

    The Upgrade and Full packaged retail product of Windows 7 Home Premium, Windows 7 Professional, and Windows 7 Ultimate will come with both 32-bit and 64-bit DVDs. With Windows Vista, the 64-bit version was only available with Windows Vista Ultimate. Due to the incredible adoption of 64-bit today and customer feedback, we decided to change this for Windows 7. Now all copies of Windows 7 in developed markets will ship with both 32-bit and 64-bit DVDs."

    This means that the only Vista Retail Boxed products that contained both the 32-bit and 64-bit Disks was Vista Ultimate. The other retail Vista edition boxes only contained the 32-bit disk, but you could order the 64-bit disk for a minimal fee from Microsoft.

    If you owned a computer with a pre-installed, OEM version of Vista, you could order the 64-bit disk from the OEM manufacturer.

    (2)    Only 32-32 or 64-64 upgrades are possible.

    This is the same distinction that most users seems to be stuck on. The key word here is Upgrade. Again, taken in context it states.

    "By purchasing Windows 7 Home Premium Upgrade you will receive both 32-bit and 64-bit versions on separate DVD media.  So you'll have the option to install either at your desire.

    If the PC you have right now is running Windows Vista Home Premium 32-bit you can upgrade to Windows 7 Home Premium 32-bit.  The same goes for 64-bit.

    An "in-place" upgrade from 32-bit Windows Vista to 64-bit Windows 7 (or the other way around) is not possible since the core architecture is different.  This would require a fresh install of the OS but does not necessarily mean you have to format your hard disk.  We're planning a post on upgrade paths and process which will outline this in detail very soon."

    What this means is that you cannot perform an In-Place Upgrade from 32-bit to 64-bit, but you can perform a clean install of 64-bit on a system running 32-bit. Why else would they include both disks in the box with the upgrade version?

    (3)    The 32-64 and 64-32 possibilities require "fresh" installation.
    Of course? You have never been able to install a version with a different architecture without a clean install?


    (4)    "Fresh" installation is neither defined as "clean" nor "full", but definitely doesn't mean "upgrade".
    Fresh = Not preserved  - Clean = Not yet used.


    (5)    The distinction of OEM vs Retail version is unapproachable.
    OEM versions of Windows have always been upgradeable to Retail versions. The main difference between OEM and Retail is that the OEM manufacturer has the responsibility to fully support all aspects of that installation. 

    I hope this answers your questions.

    Thank You for testing Windows 7

    Ronnie Vernon MVP
    Tuesday, July 14, 2009 11:26 PM

All replies

  • derosnec, none of the MS sources you mention is addressing the question of upgrading to Windows 7. Instead, they're addressing other kinds of offers.

    From the MS FAQ regarding the pre-order Windows 7 upgrade offer:
    "How do I know if I am eligible for this offer?
     To be eligible for the offer, you need to be running a genuine copy of the Windows XP or Windows Vista operating systems."

    So that's the sole requirement for upgrade-license eligibility: be running a genuine XP or Vista.

    "Will I get 32-bit or 64-bit discs?
     You’ll get both. Windows 7 Home Premium and Professional packaged products include both 32- and 64-bit discs."

    MS could not state that, with no mention of additional 64-bit licensing restrictions, and then say "Ha-ha, we only told you we'd send you the disc. We never told you you were allowed to USE it!" That tactic would be just as illegal as sending you a copy of Windows '95 instead of what they promised. Worrying about such a possibility would be paranoid and a waste of time.

    Sunday, July 5, 2009 7:04 PM
  • > I hope you're right.  But look at the roadblocks in all that preceded.  
    > There seems to be a real distinction in OEM factory Vista 32bit.

    But none of that is contrary to their earlier advertising for those particular offers, is it?

    > Given all those threads (have you reviewed? 

    Nope, not going to. Sorry. I think the matter is already abundantly clear. Good luck--I hope you resolve the question to your satisfaction.

    Sunday, July 5, 2009 7:54 PM
  • > Do your homework.

    You're assigning me homework?

    > Click the links.

    Sure, dude. I'll get right on that for you.

    Monday, July 6, 2009 12:37 AM
  • 10$ says you just install Windows 7 64-bit trial, then upgrade Windows 7 with upgrade cd-key. Just like in Vista and same questions as vista release.

    Vote for Freedom - Vote to Protect our Country
    Monday, July 6, 2009 5:15 AM

  • Windows 7 Team Blog - Update on Windows 7 RTM




    Just in passing, that article says the only 64-bit version of Vista is Ultimate 64-bit.  Or did I misunderstand?

    How do I get a 64-bit copy of Windows 7?

    The Upgrade and Full packaged retail product of Windows 7 Home Premium, Windows 7 Professional, and Windows 7 Ultimate will come with both 32-bit and 64-bit DVDs. With Windows Vista, the 64-bit version was only available with Windows Vista Ultimate. Due to the incredible adoption of 64-bit today and customer feedback, we decided to change this for Windows 7. Now all copies of Windows 7 in developed markets will ship with both 32-bit and 64-bit DVDs

    Tuesday, July 14, 2009 5:10 AM

  • Windows 7 Team Blog - Update on Windows 7 RTM




    Hmmph.  When I click the blue [Comment] button, it doesn't open a comment editor.  I just get this:

    http://windowsteamblog.com/blogs/windows7/archive/2009/07/13/update-on-windows-7-rtm.aspx#commentform




    It still talks up to and around the question of this thread.  It says 32-32 upgrades.  64-64 upgrades.

    Anybody else care to flame me for asking?



    ----------------------------------------------------------------------

    Posted on: July 13, 2009 at 8:26PM  

    I'm running 32 bit Windows 7 RC.

    When I get the final released code, I have purchased Windows 7 Upgrade Home Premium.

    I originally had the 64 bit version of Windows Vista, but I asked for and received the 32 bit version. I have both fully licensed as installed by my PC manufacturer.

    Can I upgrade using Upgrade Home Premium 7 to 64 bit Windows 7? Would a clean install mean I nuke my hard drive? Thanks



    ----------------------------------------------------------------------

    Posted on: July 13, 2009 at 10:23PM  

    @IcedCorn

    I am not sure if I'm following your question but I will take a shot at it. :)  

    By purchasing Windows 7 Home Premium Upgrade you will receive both 32-bit and 64-bit versions on separate DVD media.  So you'll have the option to install either at your desire.

    If the PC you have right now is running Windows Vista Home Premium 32-bit you can upgrade to Windows 7 Home Premium 32-bit.  The same goes for 64-bit.

    An "in-place" upgrade from 32-bit Windows Vista to 64-bit Windows 7 (or the other way around) is not possible since the core architecture is different.  This would require a fresh install of the OS but does not necessarily mean you have to format your hard disk.  We're planning a post on upgrade paths and process which will outline this in detail very soon.  

    If I've misunderstood your question please let me know.

    Thanks.

    Tuesday, July 14, 2009 5:21 AM
  • (bump - two posts above)



    (1)   The only 64-bit flavor of Vista is Ultimate-64.

    (2)    Only 32-32 or 64-64 upgrades are possible.

    (3)    The 32-64 and 64-32 possibilities require "fresh" installation.

    (4)    "Fresh" installation is neither defined as "clean" nor "full", but definitely doesn't mean "upgrade".

    (5)    The distinction of OEM vs Retail version is unapproachable.


    Tuesday, July 14, 2009 4:17 PM
  • Egads

    (1)   The only 64-bit flavor of Vista is Ultimate-64.


    You still, have the same habit of taking comments out of context.

    If you quote that entire paragraph, it says this:

    "How do I get a 64-bit copy of Windows 7?

    The Upgrade and Full packaged retail product of Windows 7 Home Premium, Windows 7 Professional, and Windows 7 Ultimate will come with both 32-bit and 64-bit DVDs. With Windows Vista, the 64-bit version was only available with Windows Vista Ultimate. Due to the incredible adoption of 64-bit today and customer feedback, we decided to change this for Windows 7. Now all copies of Windows 7 in developed markets will ship with both 32-bit and 64-bit DVDs."

    This means that the only Vista Retail Boxed products that contained both the 32-bit and 64-bit Disks was Vista Ultimate. The other retail Vista edition boxes only contained the 32-bit disk, but you could order the 64-bit disk for a minimal fee from Microsoft.

    If you owned a computer with a pre-installed, OEM version of Vista, you could order the 64-bit disk from the OEM manufacturer.

    (2)    Only 32-32 or 64-64 upgrades are possible.

    This is the same distinction that most users seems to be stuck on. The key word here is Upgrade. Again, taken in context it states.

    "By purchasing Windows 7 Home Premium Upgrade you will receive both 32-bit and 64-bit versions on separate DVD media.  So you'll have the option to install either at your desire.

    If the PC you have right now is running Windows Vista Home Premium 32-bit you can upgrade to Windows 7 Home Premium 32-bit.  The same goes for 64-bit.

    An "in-place" upgrade from 32-bit Windows Vista to 64-bit Windows 7 (or the other way around) is not possible since the core architecture is different.  This would require a fresh install of the OS but does not necessarily mean you have to format your hard disk.  We're planning a post on upgrade paths and process which will outline this in detail very soon."

    What this means is that you cannot perform an In-Place Upgrade from 32-bit to 64-bit, but you can perform a clean install of 64-bit on a system running 32-bit. Why else would they include both disks in the box with the upgrade version?

    (3)    The 32-64 and 64-32 possibilities require "fresh" installation.
    Of course? You have never been able to install a version with a different architecture without a clean install?


    (4)    "Fresh" installation is neither defined as "clean" nor "full", but definitely doesn't mean "upgrade".
    Fresh = Not preserved  - Clean = Not yet used.


    (5)    The distinction of OEM vs Retail version is unapproachable.
    OEM versions of Windows have always been upgradeable to Retail versions. The main difference between OEM and Retail is that the OEM manufacturer has the responsibility to fully support all aspects of that installation. 

    I hope this answers your questions.

    Thank You for testing Windows 7

    Ronnie Vernon MVP
    Tuesday, July 14, 2009 11:26 PM

  • OEM versions of Windows have always been upgradeable to Retail versions. The main difference between OEM and Retail is that the OEM manufacturer has the responsibility to fully support all aspects of that installation




    Ronnie, please see it from the perspective of someone who has OEM Vista-32 Home Premium.  Not retail.  I think you'll agree that comprises the vast majority of Vista users.  After all, hardly anybody deliberately upgraded from XP to Vista.  We got Vista with our new computers.

    I did research the Vista forum and search for terms like "upgrade" as you suggested.  Practically every hit I got seemed to say you needed to purchase a full retail license to go from Vista-32 to Vista-64.  Also, the Microsoft Store does not seem to offer Vista-64 Home Premium in any fashion.  Also, the June 26 new-computer promotion makes a distinction of OEM "platforms", some which are not "eligible" for the 64-bit upgrade.

    Ronnie, the list goes on.  I've done my homework.  There is a roadblock in every OEM Vista Home Premium 32bit to 64bit path I've investigated.  Now look at this latest thing.  "Fresh" install.  C'mon Ronnie!  That's a new nebulous term!  They're hedging.  Why not just say "clean", which we know at least vaguely?



    No Ronnie.  I think, much as you just mentioned, Microsoft has an agreement with OEMs to not provide a 32-64 bit upgrade path for OEM Vista-32.

    Therefore, why would I expect Microsoft to upgrade  OEM Vista-32 to Win7-64 ?    Did that agreement you mention  suddenly end ???



    See my concern?

    Wednesday, July 15, 2009 2:12 AM
  • If you have any edition of Windows Vista installed, whether it is 32-bit or 64-bit, OEM or Retail, the Upgrade editions of Windows 7 can be installed.
    However, one cannot directly "upgrade" any 32-bit edition of Windows Vista to a 64-bit edition of Windows 7 - the architectures are differnet.

    If you are currently running a 32-bit edition of Windows Vista, then you can install a 64-bit version of Windows 7 by performing a "Custom (advanced)" installation.  You would accomplish this by booting to your current Windows Vista 32-bit desktop, insert the 64-bit Windows 7 Upgrade DVD in the DVD drive, then when the setup menu appears, select "Custom (advanced)".  This will permit you to perform a "clean install" of the 64-bit edition of Windows 7 Upgrade.

    Microsoft will be shipping both Upgrade and Full License retail editions of Windows 7 Home Premium, Professional and Ultimate with both a 32-bit and 64-bit installation DVDs.

    The installation procedure is very similar to Windows Vista's.  See: Installation choices for 64-bit consumer versions of Windows Vista
    Carey Frisch
    Wednesday, July 15, 2009 2:38 AM
  • (1)   The only 64-bit flavor of Vista is Ultimate-64.


    (The quote from the link is "With Windows Vista, the 64-bit version was only available with Windows Vista Ultimate.")

    The 64 bit installation DVD was only included with the Ultimate retail packages (full and upgrade).

    However, buyers of lesser retail versions could order it separately from Microsoft for a nominal charge. The retail X86 license key also worked with the X64 version. (How much did MS save by this? $2?)

    That was how I acquired Vista Home Premium X64.

    I suppose that this is nitpicking. I imagine that Brandon LeBlanc (MS blogger) knew about the wider availability of Vista X64, but that he simplified reality. (The blog is about Windows 7, not Vista, after all.) On the other hand, I have seen MVPs who were unaware that Ultimate wasn't the only X64 Vista version available.

    And no, I don't know whether an upgrade version of Win7 will permit an X64 installation to be qualified by an OEM Vista X86 version. It seems inconsistent with the stated goal of pushing X64 adoption. It seems doubly strange if the Win7 RC can be used to qualify a Win7 RTM license, as I've read. Perhaps MS will be that petty.

    I'm more concerned personally by a statement from another blogger that a Win7 upgrade license can only be qualified by a running and activated prior OS. My XP and Vista licenses are upgrade ones. That means if I wished to install Win7 on a blank drive, the most efficient method would be to install and activate XP, and use that to qualify the Win7 upgrade license (for a "custom" install). I'd consider using Win7 RC, but I presume that it won't be possible to activate it past its expiration date next year.
    Wednesday, July 15, 2009 3:17 AM
  • (1)   The only 64-bit flavor of Vista is Ultimate-64.


    (The quote from the link is "With Windows Vista, the 64-bit version was only available with Windows Vista Ultimate.")

    The 64 bit installation DVD was only included with the Ultimate retail packages (full and upgrade).

    However, buyers of lesser retail versions could order it separately from Microsoft for a nominal charge. The retail X86 license key also worked with the X64 version. (How much did MS save by this? $2?)

    That was how I acquired Vista Home Premium X64.

    I suppose that this is nitpicking. I imagine that Brandon LeBlanc (MS blogger) knew about the wider availability of Vista X64, but that he simplified reality. (The blog is about Windows 7, not Vista, after all.) On the other hand, I have seen MVPs who were unaware that Ultimate wasn't the only X64 Vista version available.

    And no, I don't know whether an upgrade version of Win7 will permit an X64 installation to be qualified by an OEM Vista X86 version. It seems inconsistent with the stated goal of pushing X64 adoption. It seems doubly strange if the Win7 RC can be used to qualify a Win7 RTM license, as I've read. Perhaps MS will be that petty.

    I'm more concerned personally by a statement from another blogger that a Win7 upgrade license can only be qualified by a running and activated prior OS. My XP and Vista licenses are upgrade ones. That means if I wished to install Win7 on a blank drive, the most efficient method would be to install and activate XP, and use that to qualify the Win7 upgrade license (for a "custom" install). I'd consider using Win7 RC, but I presume that it won't be possible to activate it past its expiration date next year.


    bobkn, I don't understand how you obtained a 64-bit upgrade for your OEM Vista Home Premium 32-bit.  I cannot find a hint of it at the Microsoft Store.  (See for yourself what's there now).  Furthermore, the XP-Vista upgrade disk offer rejected my OEM Vista product key with "no offer found".



    Carey, thank you for your reply.

    Wednesday, July 15, 2009 3:38 AM
  • Ronnie, please see it from the perspective of someone who has OEM Vista-32 Home Premium.  Not retail.  I think you'll agree that comprises the vast majority of Vista users.  After all, hardly anybody deliberately upgraded from XP to Vista.  We got Vista with our new computers.

    I did research the Vista forum and search for terms like "upgrade" as you suggested.  Practically every hit I got seemed to say you needed to purchase a full retail license to go from Vista-32 to Vista-64.  Also, the Microsoft Store does not seem to offer Vista-64 Home Premium in any fashion.  Also, the June 26 new-computer promotion makes a distinction of OEM "platforms", some which are not "eligible" for the 64-bit upgrade.

    This is wrong information, again. In another thread you mentioned that you tried the Alternate Media website, and were denied access when you enterered your OEM product Key. This is because that website was only for Retail Customers. However, part of this same agreement was that if you had an OEM version of Vista HP 32-bit, you could simply call your OEM computer maker and they would provide the 64-bit disk of Vista Home Premium, for the same minimal cost.

    Ronnie, the list goes on.  I've done my homework.  There is a roadblock in every OEM Vista Home Premium 32bit to 64bit path I've investigated. 

    See my previous statement.


    Now look at this latest thing.  "Fresh" install.  C'mon Ronnie!  That's a new nebulous term!  They're hedging.  Why not just say "clean", which we know at least vaguely?

    I know that you have been around long enough to know what a fresh install means. Right?

    No Ronnie.  I think, much as you just mentioned, Microsoft has an agreement with OEMs to not provide a 32-64 bit upgrade path for OEM Vista-32.

    See my previous statement.

    Therefore, why would I expect Microsoft to upgrade  OEM Vista-32 to Win7-64 ?    Did that agreement you mention  suddenly end ???

    All of the pre-order offers are for the Retail Product, not OEM. The only OEM offers are if you purchase a new computer from participating OEM Mnufacturers.

    See my concern?

    NO!


    Ronnie Vernon MVP



    Wednesday, July 15, 2009 3:48 AM
  • Ronnie, please see it from the perspective of someone who has OEM Vista-32 Home Premium.  Not retail.  I think you'll agree that comprises the vast majority of Vista users.  After all, hardly anybody deliberately upgraded from XP to Vista.  We got Vista with our new computers.

    I did research the Vista forum and search for terms like "upgrade" as you suggested.  Practically every hit I got seemed to say you needed to purchase a full retail license to go from Vista-32 to Vista-64.  Also, the Microsoft Store does not seem to offer Vista-64 Home Premium in any fashion.  Also, the June 26 new-computer promotion makes a distinction of OEM "platforms", some which are not "eligible" for the 64-bit upgrade.

    This is wrong information, again. In another thread you mentioned that you tried the Alternate Media website, and were denied access when you enterered your OEM product Key. This is because that website was only for Retail Customers. However, part of this same agreement was that if you had an OEM version of Vista HP 32-bit, you could simply call your OEM computer maker and they would provide the 64-bit disk of Vista Home Premium, for the same minimal cost.





    Then why are wrong yet authoritative MVP answers on the forums?  Should I not trust MVPs?  Ahem.

    It's nice that you think my vendor HP is obliged to offer me a 64-bit upgrade for nominal fee.  They didn't.

    You think I would even know my vendor HP should offer me a 64-bit upgrade for a nominal fee.  I didn't.

    Perhaps Microsoft published that my vendor HP must offer me a 64-bit upgrade on a well known site.  They didn't.


    So now at this late date,  I should take your MVP word for it, Ronnie?


    And even if I try to test your statement, I cannot find Vista Home Premium 64-bit for sale on the MS site.

    Maybe you will provide that link later Ronnie.  But right now you are more interested in flaming me.


    Wednesday, July 15, 2009 4:10 AM

  • bobkn, I don't understand how you obtained a 64-bit upgrade for your OEM Vista Home Premium 32-bit.  I cannot find a hint of it at the Microsoft Store.  (See for yourself what's there now).  Furthermore, the XP-Vista upgrade disk offer rejected my OEM Vista product key with "no offer found".


    I didn't have an OEM version. I had a retail upgrade version. (Actually, it was the academic version, slightly cheaper.)

    To quote myself,

    "However, buyers of lesser retail versions could order it separately from Microsoft for a nominal charge. The retail X86 license key also worked with the X64 version. (How much did MS save by this? $2?)

    That was how I acquired Vista Home Premium X64."

    Was that unclear?
    Wednesday, July 15, 2009 4:12 AM

  • bobkn, I don't understand how you obtained a 64-bit upgrade for your OEM Vista Home Premium 32-bit.  I cannot find a hint of it at the Microsoft Store.  (See for yourself what's there now).  Furthermore, the XP-Vista upgrade disk offer rejected my OEM Vista product key with "no offer found".


    I didn't have an OEM version. I had a retail upgrade version. (Actually, it was the academic version, slightly cheaper.)

    To quote myself,

    "However, buyers of lesser retail versions could order it separately from Microsoft for a nominal charge. The retail X86 license key also worked with the X64 version. (How much did MS save by this? $2?)

    That was how I acquired Vista Home Premium X64."

    Was that unclear?




    Ambiguous I guess.  Actually, I thought you upgraded to retail from XP.


    Thanks for clarifying.

    Wednesday, July 15, 2009 4:24 AM