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Trouble booting Windows 7 vhd on Hyper-V Core Server 2008 RRS feed

  • Question

  • I've recently installed the Hyper-V Core on a server we have and configured it for Virtual Machine use. We made a VHD of Windows 7 box to run virtual. I've been successful in creating a new virtual machine and attaching the VHD to it. However As soon as it attempts to boot up Windows Boot Manager appears with an error Status 0xc000000e The boot selection failed because a required device is inaccessible. I have tried everything I know to do from redoing the VHD with different settings, trying different software to perform the VHD creation and then converting it to a VHD. I finally decided to make a VHD of a laptop we have running Windows XP. That worked perfectly.

    Today I used the WinPE 3.0 Virtualization tool adjust the VHD to the existing hardware. That didn't fix the problem get the same error. I downloaded and installed VMware Server and created a virtual machine using the exact same VHD of Windows 7 I had tried with Hyper-V. It was able to boot up with out any problem. Everything worked great

    So can someone help me or give me some suggestions? The windows 7 box is just a basic office computer with Sata drives and dual core intel processor.

    Thanks

     

     

    Wednesday, June 22, 2011 7:26 PM

Answers

  • This can be done using the P2V tool included with SCVMM. It launches an P2V agent on the physical target machine, reporting the hardware it has detected and gives you the option to alter anything (which can cause the conversion to fail and is best done afterwards). That gives the VM configuration for Hyper-V and it proceeds to converting the target machines physical drives into vhd files.

    Disk2VHD converts physical drived into vhd files only.

    You should be able to use the vhd you created with Disk2VHD, but you can't "import" the vhd file as an entire virtual machine, since it's only the virtual hard disk file and does not hold any Hyper-V settings, such as amount of RAM, number of CPU cores and so on.

    After converting the physical machine using Disk2VHD you need to create a new VM with new settings in Hyper-V, but attach the vhd you created as hard drive, and the VM should be ready to go. 

    • Edited by Mike_Andrews Friday, September 23, 2011 2:33 PM
    • Proposed as answer by Massara Friday, September 23, 2011 9:39 PM
    • Unproposed as answer by Massara Friday, September 23, 2011 9:39 PM
    • Proposed as answer by Massara Friday, September 23, 2011 9:39 PM
    • Marked as answer by Carmen SummersMicrosoft employee Monday, September 26, 2011 11:17 PM
    Friday, September 23, 2011 2:28 PM

All replies

  • What tool did you use to create the Win7 VM?  SCVMM?  Disk2VHD?  IF you used either of those it should have worked.  If you have tried those, I would recommend that you do so.  If you only have a single physical machine that you need to convert, then Disk2VHD may be easier to use.  If you're looking for more management functions, such as a central repository for all VM files (VHDs, ISOs, scripts) or if you want to migrate VMs between host servers, then SCVMM is the better solution.

     

    ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

    Best Regards, Mike Briggs [MSFT] -- posting provided "AS IS" with no warranties and confers no rights

    Wednesday, June 22, 2011 8:35 PM
    Moderator
  • I have tried Disk2VHD, WinImage, VMware anything that I could test it to try and get it to work. I noticed this morning that when it's first trying to boot it shows the Hyper-V logo right before it crashes. The windows XP virtual shows the XP logo.......So why does it show Hyper-V and not the Windows 7 logo?? My co-worker and I decided to blow the virtual machine away and start over both reviewing each setting just to ensure we didn't miss anything. We had another image that we created from Win Image of the exact same machine. Same results. My co-worker feels that perhaps it's trying to load recovery partition. Note the Windows 7 machine has 3 partitions on it's drive and we selected them all when creating the VHD. I question this theory simply because when it boots up we see the Hyper-V logo. But we've decided to test the theory by creating a new backup of the same machine using Disk2VHD and only selecting the C drive.

    What really bugs me as well is that the exact same image I'm having trouble with in Hyper-V works beautifully with VMware.....

    Will post results of the next test.

     

    Friday, June 24, 2011 4:11 PM
  • Update on latest test (VHD copy with only C partition selected). The image will still not boot via Hyper-V, but I get a different error this time "A disk read error occured press ctrl+alt+delete to restart." I did some research on this problem and found one forum stating that Windows 7 boots from the recovery partition rather than the files within the Windows folder located on the C partition. I've never heard of this before, but if this is true it gives me a new theory:

    The machine is trying to boot by going out of it's main partition to access the boot files and ends up accessing the physical hard drive on the server and trying to boot using it's boot files (would explain the Hyper V logo), would also make sense why it can't boot. The machine that has VMware installed and has been successful with the image is running Windows 7. So if in fact this is what it doing it would work with VMware because it can use the physical OS to boot since it's the same version. I'm working on converting the same image to vmdk so I can try it again from VMware. If it is successful then I will try to install VMware on a machine not running Windows 7 and see what happens.

    Monday, June 27, 2011 7:11 PM
  • Hi!

    It sounds like you have an issue with storage drivers. If you converted your vhd from a physical machine you probably have AHCI drivers that will not function with Hyper-V. You could enter the physical machine BIOS and set the SATA mode to IDE/ATA compatible and try to create your vhd file with those settings. 

    Tuesday, June 28, 2011 7:19 AM
  • Hi!

    It sounds like you have an issue with storage drivers. If you converted your vhd from a physical machine you probably have AHCI drivers that will not function with Hyper-V. You could enter the physical machine BIOS and set the SATA mode to IDE/ATA compatible and try to create your vhd file with those settings. 


    Thanks Mike I will take a look at that. As for the most recent events, VMware says the virtual file I have now has the hard drive configured as a SCSI and of course it won't boot. Tried deleting it and recreating it as an IDE, but it's something in the virtual file itself that has the configuration. Of course WinImage crashes everytime I attempt to view what's in it. So now I'm going to check the BIOS settings, as well as the Disk2VHD settings, then recreate the image.
    Tuesday, June 28, 2011 1:10 PM
  • Hi!

    It sounds like you have an issue with storage drivers. If you converted your vhd from a physical machine you probably have AHCI drivers that will not function with Hyper-V. You could enter the physical machine BIOS and set the SATA mode to IDE/ATA compatible and try to create your vhd file with those settings. 


    Well I did infact have the physical machine set as AHCI in the BIOS. I tried reverting it back to IDE, but it failed to boot. It had the RAID option, and up MORE research found that Intel recommends using RAID always even if you're not RAIDing. So I have it set that way now and am MAKING another VHD. It would be really nice if in Hyper-V's documentation it would list these types of known issues. If it is out there, I have not come across it. Thanks for your help.
    Tuesday, June 28, 2011 3:16 PM
  • Well, Hyper-V can only boot from IDE drives. AHCI involves a storage controller that is absent once you migrated to Hyper-V, but in the OS bootinformation it points to a drive location thats not there.

    If you stick with IDE compatibility mode, repair/reinstall your Windows7 OS and then perform the Disk2Vhd migration, it should start just fine.

     

    Tuesday, June 28, 2011 4:07 PM
  • All,

    I know this work in Windows 2008 Server but now with Windows 2008 R2, it doesn't seem to work.

    Anyhow so I created a Windows 7 Enterprise  vm/.vhd using SysInternal Disk2vhd Utility and it produced a .vhd with no error.

    I then copied it to my Windows 2008 R2 Server and when I try to "Import Virtual Machine", I get an import failed.

    It says you can imort a virtual machine only if you used Hyper-V to create and export it

    Thursday, September 22, 2011 7:37 PM
  • Yes, in order to import a virtual machine in Hyper-V, it must first have been exported from Hyper-V. In your case you created a single vhd file with a P2V conversion tool, so there is no virtual machine configuration to import.

    What you do in a case like this, is to create a new virtual machine and attach the existing vhd file.

    Friday, September 23, 2011 3:43 AM
  • Eh, I am sorry so I can't use Disk2vhd anymore and import the .vhd using Windows 2008 RD Hyper-V?

    How do I do this conversion using P2V Conversion tool?

    Friday, September 23, 2011 1:51 PM
  • This can be done using the P2V tool included with SCVMM. It launches an P2V agent on the physical target machine, reporting the hardware it has detected and gives you the option to alter anything (which can cause the conversion to fail and is best done afterwards). That gives the VM configuration for Hyper-V and it proceeds to converting the target machines physical drives into vhd files.

    Disk2VHD converts physical drived into vhd files only.

    You should be able to use the vhd you created with Disk2VHD, but you can't "import" the vhd file as an entire virtual machine, since it's only the virtual hard disk file and does not hold any Hyper-V settings, such as amount of RAM, number of CPU cores and so on.

    After converting the physical machine using Disk2VHD you need to create a new VM with new settings in Hyper-V, but attach the vhd you created as hard drive, and the VM should be ready to go. 

    • Edited by Mike_Andrews Friday, September 23, 2011 2:33 PM
    • Proposed as answer by Massara Friday, September 23, 2011 9:39 PM
    • Unproposed as answer by Massara Friday, September 23, 2011 9:39 PM
    • Proposed as answer by Massara Friday, September 23, 2011 9:39 PM
    • Marked as answer by Carmen SummersMicrosoft employee Monday, September 26, 2011 11:17 PM
    Friday, September 23, 2011 2:28 PM
  • Mike_Andrews,

    Thanks for the input.  This is another way that seem to work.

     

    Virtualize Windows 7

    1- Download dis2kvhd.exe at http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/sysinternals/ee656415.aspx

    2 - Extract and run dis2kvhd.exe

                    -Agree to license agreement

    3. Select all Drive

     

    *This takes a couple of hours"

     

    4. Copy the .vhd image to the Windows 2008 Server. (i.e temp folder or create a folder)

     

    AT THE WINDOWS 2008 SERVER

    1. Open "Server Manager"

    2. Click "Roles" and click "Add Roles"

                    -Click "Next"

    3. Select "Hyper-V"  (This will enable Microsoft Hyper-V on the 2008 Server)

                    -Click "Next" two times

    4. At the "Create Virtual Network"

                    -Select "Local Area Connection" and click "Next"

    5. Click "Install" to install or enable Hyper-V

     

    CAUTION: Need to restart Windows 2008 Server so they can do this during Maintenance Window

     

    6. Authenticate to Windows 2008 Server to complete installation

    7. Expand Roles/Hyper-V Manager/

                    -Select the Windows 20008 Server Name

                    -Click "New" and select "Virtual Machine..."

                    -Click "Next" at the welcome screen

                    -Name it something and click "Next"

                    -Set Memory from 512MB to whatever and click "Next"

                    -Click "Next" at the Configure Networking

                    -Select "Use an existing virtual hard disk and browse to the .vhd

                    -Click "Next" and Finish"

     

    9. Start the new VM and wait untill it says its "running"

    10. Connect to the VM

    11. Log into Windows 7 and enable RDP

     

    Friday, September 23, 2011 9:40 PM
  • Well, Hyper-V can only boot from IDE drives. AHCI involves a storage controller that is absent once you migrated to Hyper-V, but in the OS bootinformation it points to a drive location thats not there.

    If you stick with IDE compatibility mode, repair/reinstall your Windows7 OS and then perform the Disk2Vhd migration, it should start just fine.

     

    Is there any other solution except reinstalling Windows? How one can repair it?
    Saturday, February 25, 2017 7:49 PM