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Public Folders is empty, but Database is 90Gigs RRS feed

  • Question

  • We have a Public Folders that has become corrupted over the years. I have copied the database and pulled all the files from it so I don't care about the data anymore. But when we cleared all the public folder data out, we found that the Database is around 90Gigs (after offline defrag) but there isn't any data/files in the database. I have done a repair on the database as well and it didn't change anything.

    Ultimately, I would like to have a clean public folders to start using again, but something seams to be seriously wrong with this database and I don't have the experience to do a step by step removal of the database and create a new one.  I was hoping I could get this one cleaned up and back to running. 

    What the Public folders is doing (since its corrupted) is its slowing the exchange server down to a crawl/unresponsive.

    Thanks in advance,

    System info:

    Exchange 2010/Server 2008 (all latest updates)

    Quad CPU 2.83/8Gig RAM

    Monday, October 20, 2014 2:35 PM

Answers

  • Have you checked the system folders?  While they shouldn't be 90GB, they will take up some space.  Also, you mention one public folder - how many public folders did this database host? If you are positive there is no data in the database anymore, you may just delete the database files and let the system build a new empty database.
    Monday, October 20, 2014 2:55 PM
  • Hi,

    You can mount a blank public folder database and then check the size of public folder database if it is still large.

    You can follow the steps below to mount a blank public folder database:

    • Dismount the public folder database on the Exchange 2010 server.
    • Go to the folder path of the public folder database EDB file.
    • Rename the EDB file to old EDB file or move to another location.
    • Go back to the management console and mount the public folder database. You will get a warning that one or more database files is missing. Go ahead and click OK to mount a blank database file.

    After that, please check the public folder database size again. If it is very large, you can just delete the old public folder database and recreate a new public folder database as Willard Martin suggested.

    Best regards,


    Belinda Ma
    TechNet Community Support

    Tuesday, October 21, 2014 5:55 AM
    Moderator

All replies

  • Have you checked the system folders?  While they shouldn't be 90GB, they will take up some space.  Also, you mention one public folder - how many public folders did this database host? If you are positive there is no data in the database anymore, you may just delete the database files and let the system build a new empty database.
    Monday, October 20, 2014 2:55 PM
  • Hi,

    You can mount a blank public folder database and then check the size of public folder database if it is still large.

    You can follow the steps below to mount a blank public folder database:

    • Dismount the public folder database on the Exchange 2010 server.
    • Go to the folder path of the public folder database EDB file.
    • Rename the EDB file to old EDB file or move to another location.
    • Go back to the management console and mount the public folder database. You will get a warning that one or more database files is missing. Go ahead and click OK to mount a blank database file.

    After that, please check the public folder database size again. If it is very large, you can just delete the old public folder database and recreate a new public folder database as Willard Martin suggested.

    Best regards,


    Belinda Ma
    TechNet Community Support

    Tuesday, October 21, 2014 5:55 AM
    Moderator
  • Blank mounting the database is best option available.

    Cheers,

    Gulab Prasad

    Technology Consultant

    Blog: http://www.exchangeranger.com    Twitter:   LinkedIn:
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    Tuesday, October 21, 2014 9:05 AM