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Need to install "R", "RStudio" in Sql 2016? RRS feed

Answers

  • Hi there.

    1. You don't need to. It gets installed as part of Microsoft R Open that gets installed when you install SQL Server 2016 R Services. See here for more info on Microsoft R Open and the packages installed with it: https://mran.microsoft.com/open/

    https://mran.microsoft.com/rro/installed/

    2. You can do that, but you should ask yourself what is it you are trying to achieve. Specifically the R distribution that's installed with SQL Server R Services resides under the folder hierarchy of the SQL Server instance, so you would need to point R Studio to it, depending on what you are trying to achieve.

    You may want to take a look at several documentation topics:

    - installing R Services: https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/mt696069.aspx

    - installing a data science client: https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/mt696067.aspx

    - installing R packages on SQL Server: https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/mt591989.aspx

    Best,

    Dotan

    • Marked as answer by edm2 Saturday, May 21, 2016 4:48 AM
    • Unmarked as answer by edm2 Saturday, May 21, 2016 4:49 AM
    • Marked as answer by edm2 Saturday, May 21, 2016 2:42 PM
    Saturday, May 21, 2016 4:30 AM
    Moderator
  • You can continue working with R Studio as you used to. R Services allows you to work with an IDE of your choice. It's just a question of whether you want to develop your code on a client machine, or you expect to do it directly on the SQL Server machine (in a company that keeps the server isolated this may not be desired), or maybe you wanted the IDE for other purposes such as installing packages on the server. Hopefully the links will help clarify.

    btw the getting started section has some illustrations of the client-server model. We will introduce some changes to the client installation in the next couple of weeks. Stay tuned..

    Dotan

     
    • Marked as answer by edm2 Saturday, May 21, 2016 2:42 PM
    Saturday, May 21, 2016 5:21 AM
    Moderator

All replies

  • Hi there.

    1. You don't need to. It gets installed as part of Microsoft R Open that gets installed when you install SQL Server 2016 R Services. See here for more info on Microsoft R Open and the packages installed with it: https://mran.microsoft.com/open/

    https://mran.microsoft.com/rro/installed/

    2. You can do that, but you should ask yourself what is it you are trying to achieve. Specifically the R distribution that's installed with SQL Server R Services resides under the folder hierarchy of the SQL Server instance, so you would need to point R Studio to it, depending on what you are trying to achieve.

    You may want to take a look at several documentation topics:

    - installing R Services: https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/mt696069.aspx

    - installing a data science client: https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/mt696067.aspx

    - installing R packages on SQL Server: https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/mt591989.aspx

    Best,

    Dotan

    • Marked as answer by edm2 Saturday, May 21, 2016 4:48 AM
    • Unmarked as answer by edm2 Saturday, May 21, 2016 4:49 AM
    • Marked as answer by edm2 Saturday, May 21, 2016 2:42 PM
    Saturday, May 21, 2016 4:30 AM
    Moderator
  • Thank you Dolan. I will definitely review the URLs you included.

    I have always used RStudio (on top of R) so I thought that would be the "model" to follow under sql 2016. I was trying to recreate it under sql 2016

    edm2


    • Edited by edm2 Saturday, May 21, 2016 4:52 AM
    Saturday, May 21, 2016 4:48 AM
  • You can continue working with R Studio as you used to. R Services allows you to work with an IDE of your choice. It's just a question of whether you want to develop your code on a client machine, or you expect to do it directly on the SQL Server machine (in a company that keeps the server isolated this may not be desired), or maybe you wanted the IDE for other purposes such as installing packages on the server. Hopefully the links will help clarify.

    btw the getting started section has some illustrations of the client-server model. We will introduce some changes to the client installation in the next couple of weeks. Stay tuned..

    Dotan

     
    • Marked as answer by edm2 Saturday, May 21, 2016 2:42 PM
    Saturday, May 21, 2016 5:21 AM
    Moderator
  • Dolan,

    You wrote

    >>> .It's just a question of whether you want to develop your code on a client machine, or you expect to do it directly on the SQL Server machine

    No there's the rub! I had read that part of the excitement of having R integrated with sql server is that, in many cases, one would not need to pull the data over the network to another server. One could operate directly on sql 2016 data using R. It would seem that a "client-server" model inherently requires more network bandwidth than simply installing RStudio directly on the server (if one is allowed to do so.)  If one isn't allowed to install RStudio directly on sql 2016, then the client install is the next best choice.

    edm2

    P.S. I will try to read the URLs you provided tomorrow.

    Saturday, May 21, 2016 5:41 AM
  • Than you Dotan. The links are very good at pointing out the steps necessary to get R up and running in sql 2016. You commentary is also excellent and insightful.

    edm2

    Saturday, May 21, 2016 2:41 PM