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[Boot Manager][SOLVED] Fixing UEFI Boot Issues: Black Screen After BIOS POST. Booting Only Possible From BIOS F12 Boot Menu RRS feed

  • General discussion

  • Hello,

    I am having problems with direct booting into Windows 8 installed into a VHDX file.

    This is a four-partition UEFI boot on a GPT drive. EFI files are residing on a second partition of disk 0 (the ESP partition) in the EFI folder. The boot virtual disk is residing on the fourth partition of that disk 0.

    When I turn on the PC, it shows black screen after the BIOS POST screen. No Windows 8 boot menu, no other information is displayed. However, if I press Shift+F12 (or F12) to start Dell BIOS Boot Menu and choose Windows Boot Manager from the UEFI part of the boot menu, Windows 8 starts to boot without difficulties.

    How do I make Windows to boot automatically without having to select Windows Boot Manager in DELL BIOS boot menu?

    I believe I messed up with boot sector somehow... What needs to be fixed provided that Windows 8 will boot into VHDX file?

    Thank you.


    Well this is the world we live in And these are the hands we're given...


    Sunday, September 9, 2012 10:27 PM

All replies

  • Anybody has any clue on what would be the possible way to fixing this issue?

    Thanks.


    Well this is the world we live in And these are the hands we're given...

    Thursday, December 20, 2012 1:33 PM
  • When I turn on the PC, it shows black screen after the BIOS POST screen.

    Try investigating the scope of that symptom.  E.g. some are aware that they still have keyboard functionality even though they can't see anything and they may even have sound which means that it they could navigate to the Accessibility button they could open that menu and hear comforting words...   ;  )

    FWIW  the safest procedure that I can think of for this scenario is the following loop:   Shift-Tab, Shift-Enter, wait (if the harddrive seems busy as a result of the Shift-Enter wait until that settles down.)    The idea would be to end up at the Advanced Options screen.

    BTW nice that UEFI can allow you to force the Boot manager's menu.   I have been assuming that users would need to use bcdedit  to do that.

     

    HTH

     
    Robert Aldwinckle
    ---

    Thursday, December 20, 2012 6:59 PM
  • Hi Robert,

    Thank you for your response!

    It seems to me that the problem is with boot code that seems to contain reference to the boot manager that is missing from the partition it is referencing to.

    This PC is using native VHD boot from a GPT physical drive. The VHD virtual disk is NOT a GPT. It's a MBR disk.

    The VHD drive is located on the separate partition with the boot code. That is the boot code and the boot manager are located on separate partitions.

    I have a similar setup where both the virtual and physical drives are GPT drives and everything works fine.

    In fact, that VHD drive is not a GPT drive just but the reason I moved it from another non-UEFI PC.

    I am thinking of the following:

    1. Booting from Window Setup and patching the boot partition on the VHD disk using diskpart

    DISKPART>SELECT VDISK FILE=C:\WIN8.VHDX
    
    DISKPART>ATTACH VDISK
    
    DISKPART>LIST DISK
    
    DISKPART>SELECT DISK X
    
    DISKPART>LIST PART
    
    DISKPART>SELECT PART X
    
    DISKPART>ACTIVE
    

    Where X is the VHD disk and its primary partition correspondingly.

    It seems like the following happens:

    1. BIOS looks up for the boot code on the fist device: physical hard drive, partition 2

    2. The boot code successfully executes and points to partition 4 on that hard drive.

    It looks like the boot code does not point to the boot manager on the partition 1 within the VHD drive!

    If using diskpart gives nothing, I plan to image that VHD using ImageX clean the VHD, convert it to GPT, and apply created image to its system partition 4.

    What do you think?


    Well this is the world we live in And these are the hands we're given...

    Friday, December 21, 2012 11:28 AM
  • Didn't help. Oops. Moreover, installing Windows to a new VHD, now converted to GPT, doesn't solve this as well, BIOS still can't find the boot manager. Using F12 still helps but isn't very handy...

    Well this is the world we live in And these are the hands we're given...

    Sunday, December 23, 2012 10:35 PM
  • Okay, I'll explain it further. Possibly, somebody will going to pinpoint the right direction to solving this issue.

    That's an old DELL Latitude 4310 laptop with a 500 Gbyte HDD from Toshiba (disk 0) in it:

    DISKPART> detail disk
    
    TOSHIBA MK5056GSY
    Disk ID: {343d37ff-4962-4ba9-ac07-3201235928a5}
    Type   : SATA
    Status : Online
    Path   : 0
    Target : 0
    LUN ID : 0
    Location Path : UNAVAILABLE
    Current Read-only State : No
    Read-only  : No
    Boot Disk  : No
    Pagefile Disk  : Yes
    Hibernation File Disk  : No
    Crashdump Disk  : Yes
    Clustered Disk  : No
    
      Volume ###  Ltr  Label        Fs     Type        Size     Status     Info
      ----------  ---  -----------  -----  ----------  -------  ---------  --------
      Volume 1     D   Data         NTFS   Partition    465 GB  Healthy    Pagefile
      Volume 2         Recovery     NTFS   Partition    300 MB  Healthy    Hidden
      Volume 3                      FAT32  Partition    100 MB  Healthy    System

    This is a GUID Partition Table disk that has 4 partitions on it:

    DISKPART> select disk 0
    
    Disk 0 is now the selected disk.
    
    DISKPART> list part
    
      Partition ###  Type              Size     Offset
      -------------  ----------------  -------  -------
      Partition 1    Recovery           300 MB  1024 KB
      Partition 2    System             100 MB   301 MB
      Partition 3    Reserved           128 MB   401 MB
      Partition 4    Primary            465 GB   529 MB

    These partitions were automatically created by Windows 8 setup when I was first installing Windows 8 on this laptop.

    Partition 4 is formatted into NTFS and holds the Microsoft Virtual Disk VHD that contains Windows 8:

    DISKPART> detail disk
    
    Microsoft Virtual Disk
    Disk ID: 3FF6784C
    Type   : File Backed Virtual
    Status : Online
    Path   : 0
    Target : 0
    LUN ID : 1
    Location Path : UNAVAILABLE
    Current Read-only State : No
    Read-only  : No
    Boot Disk  : Yes
    Pagefile Disk  : Yes
    Hibernation File Disk  : No
    Crashdump Disk  : No
    Clustered Disk  : No
    
      Volume ###  Ltr  Label        Fs     Type        Size     Status     Info
      ----------  ---  -----------  -----  ----------  -------  ---------  --------
      Volume 4     C   System       NTFS   Partition     99 GB  Healthy    Boot
    

    This VHDX disk is a 100 Gbyte MBR disk:

    DISKPART> list vdisk
    
      VDisk ###  Disk ###  State                 Type       File
      ---------  --------  --------------------  ---------  ----
      VDisk 0    Disk 1    Attached not open     Expandable  \Device\HarddiskVolume4
    \win8rtm.vhdx

    So I have totalling 2 disk on my system (seen from the natively-booted Windows):

    DISKPART> list disk
    
      Disk ###  Status         Size     Free     Dyn  Gpt
      --------  -------------  -------  -------  ---  ---
      Disk 0    Online          465 GB      0 B        *
      Disk 1    Online          100 GB      0 B

    These are:

    • Disk 0 --- my physical hard drive
    • Disk 1 --- the VHDX residing on Partition 4 of Disk 0.

     The VHDX file contains a single 100 Gbyte primary partition formatted into NTFS:

    DISKPART> list part
    
      Partition ###  Type              Size     Offset
      -------------  ----------------  -------  -------
      Partition 1    Primary             99 GB  1024 KB
    

    Now what happens when I start the laptop:

    1. If I don't do anything after turning it on, it comes with a black screen right after BIOS finishes its POST.

    2. If I press F12 to show BIOS boot menu, it shows an option:

    UEFI: Windows Boot Manager

    If I choose that option, Windows Boot Manager appears as desired and I can choose my Windows 8 setup residing on that win8rtm.vhdx from there.

    In other words, I can't make the laptop to see my boot manager rather than by forcibly choosing Windows Boot Manager entry (which is set as default in BIOS) from short-cut BIOS menu!

    Granted, there's something messed with references to the boot manager on the first device seen from UEFI BIOS.

    How am I supposed to fix that?

    I've tried

    bootsect /nt60 d: /force
    bcdboot c:\windows /s d: /f UEFI /v /m {GUID_RETURNED_BY_BOOTSECT}

    where C:\windows is a Windows 8 folder on the D:\win8rtm.vhdx VHD file, and D is a drive letter of System partition (Partition 4) on my physical HDD. All to no avail.

    Here's the output of my BCD boot configuration database:

    C:\windows\system32>bcdedit
    
    Windows Boot Manager
    --------------------
    identifier              {bootmgr}
    device                  partition=\Device\HarddiskVolume2
    path                    \EFI\Microsoft\Boot\bootmgfw.efi
    description             Windows Boot Manager
    locale                  en-us
    inherit                 {globalsettings}
    default                 {current}
    resumeobject            {a329b5c9-fb29-11e1-a74d-f2c962d62240}
    displayorder            {a329b5ca-fb29-11e1-a74d-f2c962d62240}
                            {a329b5c2-fb29-11e1-a74d-f2c962d62240}
                            {current}
    toolsdisplayorder       {memdiag}
    timeout                 30
    
    Windows Boot Loader
    -------------------
    identifier              {a329b5ca-fb29-11e1-a74d-f2c962d62240}
    device                  vhd=[D:]\win8ent-eval.vhd
    path                    \windows\system32\winload.efi
    description             Windows 8
    locale                  en-us
    inherit                 {bootloadersettings}
    isolatedcontext         Yes
    allowedinmemorysettings 0x15000075
    osdevice                vhd=[D:]\win8ent-eval.vhd
    systemroot              \windows
    resumeobject            {a329b5c9-fb29-11e1-a74d-f2c962d62240}
    nx                      OptIn
    bootmenupolicy          Standard
    detecthal               Yes
    
    Windows Boot Loader
    -------------------
    identifier              {a329b5c2-fb29-11e1-a74d-f2c962d62240}
    device                  vhd=[D:]\win8ent.vhdx
    path                    \Windows\system32\winload.efi
    description             Windows 8
    locale                  en-US
    inherit                 {bootloadersettings}
    recoverysequence        {a329b5c3-fb29-11e1-a74d-f2c962d62240}
    recoveryenabled         Yes
    isolatedcontext         Yes
    allowedinmemorysettings 0x15000075
    osdevice                vhd=[D:]\win8ent.vhdx
    systemroot              \Windows
    resumeobject            {a329b5c1-fb29-11e1-a74d-f2c962d62240}
    nx                      OptIn
    bootmenupolicy          Standard
    
    Windows Boot Loader
    -------------------
    identifier              {current}
    device                  partition=C:
    path                    \windows\system32\winload.efi
    description             Windows 8
    locale                  en-us
    inherit                 {bootloadersettings}
    recoverysequence        {a329b5be-fb29-11e1-a74d-f2c962d62240}
    recoveryenabled         Yes
    isolatedcontext         Yes
    allowedinmemorysettings 0x15000075
    osdevice                partition=C:
    systemroot              \windows
    resumeobject            {a329b5bc-fb29-11e1-a74d-f2c962d62240}
    nx                      OptIn
    bootmenupolicy          Standard
    detecthal               Yes

    More details:

    C:\windows\system32>bcdedit /v /enum
    
    Windows Boot Manager
    --------------------
    identifier              {9dea862c-5cdd-4e70-acc1-f32b344d4795}
    device                  partition=\Device\HarddiskVolume2
    path                    \EFI\Microsoft\Boot\bootmgfw.efi
    description             Windows Boot Manager
    locale                  en-us
    inherit                 {7ea2e1ac-2e61-4728-aaa3-896d9d0a9f0e}
    default                 {a329b5bd-fb29-11e1-a74d-f2c962d62240}
    resumeobject            {a329b5c9-fb29-11e1-a74d-f2c962d62240}
    displayorder            {a329b5ca-fb29-11e1-a74d-f2c962d62240}
                            {a329b5c2-fb29-11e1-a74d-f2c962d62240}
                            {a329b5bd-fb29-11e1-a74d-f2c962d62240}
    toolsdisplayorder       {b2721d73-1db4-4c62-bf78-c548a880142d}
    timeout                 30
    
    Windows Boot Loader
    -------------------
    identifier              {a329b5ca-fb29-11e1-a74d-f2c962d62240}
    device                  vhd=[D:]\win8ent-eval.vhd,locate=custom:12000002
    path                    \windows\system32\winload.efi
    description             Windows 8
    locale                  en-us
    inherit                 {6efb52bf-1766-41db-a6b3-0ee5eff72bd7}
    isolatedcontext         Yes
    allowedinmemorysettings 0x15000075
    osdevice                vhd=[D:]\win8ent-eval.vhd,locate=custom:22000002
    systemroot              \windows
    resumeobject            {a329b5c9-fb29-11e1-a74d-f2c962d62240}
    nx                      OptIn
    bootmenupolicy          Standard
    detecthal               Yes
    
    Windows Boot Loader
    -------------------
    identifier              {a329b5c2-fb29-11e1-a74d-f2c962d62240}
    device                  vhd=[D:]\win8ent.vhdx,locate=custom:12000002
    path                    \Windows\system32\winload.efi
    description             Windows 8
    locale                  en-US
    inherit                 {6efb52bf-1766-41db-a6b3-0ee5eff72bd7}
    recoverysequence        {a329b5c3-fb29-11e1-a74d-f2c962d62240}
    recoveryenabled         Yes
    isolatedcontext         Yes
    allowedinmemorysettings 0x15000075
    osdevice                vhd=[D:]\win8ent.vhdx,locate=custom:22000002
    systemroot              \Windows
    resumeobject            {a329b5c1-fb29-11e1-a74d-f2c962d62240}
    nx                      OptIn
    bootmenupolicy          Standard
    
    Windows Boot Loader
    -------------------
    identifier              {a329b5bd-fb29-11e1-a74d-f2c962d62240}
    device                  vhd=[D:]\win8rtm.vhdx,locate=custom:12000002
    path                    \windows\system32\winload.efi
    description             Windows 8
    locale                  en-us
    inherit                 {6efb52bf-1766-41db-a6b3-0ee5eff72bd7}
    recoverysequence        {a329b5be-fb29-11e1-a74d-f2c962d62240}
    recoveryenabled         Yes
    isolatedcontext         Yes
    allowedinmemorysettings 0x15000075
    osdevice                vhd=[D:]\win8rtm.vhdx,locate=custom:22000002
    systemroot              \windows
    resumeobject            {a329b5bc-fb29-11e1-a74d-f2c962d62240}
    nx                      OptIn
    bootmenupolicy          Standard
    detecthal               Yes

    I would appreciate any help.

    Thank you.


    Well this is the world we live in And these are the hands we're given...

    Monday, December 24, 2012 12:49 AM
  • Does anybody know how do I get the location of the currently used Boot Configuration Database via bcdboot?

    Well this is the world we live in And these are the hands we're given...

    Monday, December 24, 2012 11:26 PM
  • The issue solved.

    Somehow, updating DELL Latitude 4310 BIOS from rev. A10 to rev. A11 then running Automatic troubleshooter in Windows 8 Boot Manager fixed the issue.

    Additionally, I changed POST settings in BIOS from Minimal to Automatic for it to be configured by OS (as per DELL).

    Now I don't have to press F12 in order to point UEFI BIOS to Windows Boot Manager. The screen remains black for some short time but now that it switches to loading Windows Boot Manager and it no longer hangs black for forever.


    Well this is the world we live in And these are the hands we're given...

    Monday, December 24, 2012 11:47 PM
  • Wednesday, December 26, 2012 5:05 PM
  • I have the exact same behaviour on a physical install, on a Dell E6510 - the Bios boot entry is correct, it is set to UEFI, but just black screen on boot.

    If I press F12 and select the same boot entry as in the BIOS, it boots. It makes no sense.

    The BIOS is the newest A15.

    I am annoyed at pssibly having to install non-uefi just to fix this.

    :-)

    [FIXED] -> Change 'POST Behaviour' from 'Minimal' to 'Auto'
    • Edited by WingBabs Friday, November 1, 2013 4:24 PM
    Thursday, October 31, 2013 3:59 PM
  • I resolved the issue by changing from POST behaviour from Minimal to Auto. This on a Dell E6510 with A15
    Friday, November 1, 2013 4:23 PM
  • Confirm - this is correct solution for Dell Latitude E6410
    Saturday, December 5, 2015 5:10 PM
  • 3 years later, and it worked for me as well but after a Windows 10 install.  Dell Precision M4500.

    Friday, September 21, 2018 9:29 AM