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Installing Microsoft Office 32 Bit into regular "Program Files" folder - Windows 7 RRS feed

  • Question

  • I have a program which is running on Microsoft Access 2010. Its a network installed program, with an established file pathway for all of our XP computers.

    Now that we're upgrading to Windows 7, the file pathway has to be changed to Program Files x86 (where Office 2010 - 32 bit version is installed).

    The problem is I can't change the pathway for the Windows 7 computers without rendering our XP computers inoperable.

    Is there any way to install Office 2010 (32-bit) into the regular Program Files folder in Windows 7? I'm willing to delete the 64-bit version altogether to eliminate possible conflicting issues.

    Thanks!

    • Moved by Carey FrischMVP Tuesday, July 10, 2012 6:17 PM Moved to more appropriate forum category (From:Windows 7 Miscellaneous)
    Tuesday, July 10, 2012 6:12 PM

Answers

  • Un-install Office 2010 altogether complete with the 32-bit and 64-bit version from Windows 7 system. Now try installing Office 2010 32-bit, but instead of clicking "Install Now", click Customize button. Select the File Location tab from the top and click Browse button. Browse to C:\Program Files\Microsoft Office (or simply remove the x86 part from the location, so that it becomes C:\Program Files\Microsoft Office).

    Should work, as per searches on the web.

    • Proposed as answer by Jeremy_Wu Thursday, July 12, 2012 5:48 AM
    • Marked as answer by Nicholas Li Monday, July 30, 2012 2:44 AM
    Wednesday, July 11, 2012 11:33 AM
  • No easy way around this one. You can install the 64-bit of Office which installs to C:\Program Files however the x86 Office will always install to C:\Program Files (x86)

    Every migration project I worked on used 32-bit office, this is because most companies use a lot of legacy 32-bit Office Addins and so require the 32-bit Office to work.

    My suggestion would be get the other application redeveloped to work in 64-bit. Or you could try this and I say this without knowing if it's a good option or not as in cases like this I always would get a compatible version rather than use a work around.

    But how about using a shim to intercept the call for the application and show that it's in the C:\Program Files\ path even when it's not. Kind of like a Symlink

    http://blogs.msdn.com/b/cjacks/archive/2007/10/15/using-the-correctfilepaths-shim-to-redirect-files-on-windows-vista.aspx


    PLEASE MARK ANY ANSWERS TO HELP OTHERS Blog: rorymon.com Twitter: @Rorymon

    • Proposed as answer by Jeremy_Wu Thursday, July 12, 2012 5:48 AM
    • Marked as answer by Nicholas Li Monday, July 30, 2012 2:44 AM
    Wednesday, July 11, 2012 4:16 PM

All replies

  • Un-install Office 2010 altogether complete with the 32-bit and 64-bit version from Windows 7 system. Now try installing Office 2010 32-bit, but instead of clicking "Install Now", click Customize button. Select the File Location tab from the top and click Browse button. Browse to C:\Program Files\Microsoft Office (or simply remove the x86 part from the location, so that it becomes C:\Program Files\Microsoft Office).

    Should work, as per searches on the web.

    • Proposed as answer by Jeremy_Wu Thursday, July 12, 2012 5:48 AM
    • Marked as answer by Nicholas Li Monday, July 30, 2012 2:44 AM
    Wednesday, July 11, 2012 11:33 AM
  • Hi Sean,

    If possible, can you please explian the problem with more info. How do you think Office 2010 (32-bit) installation in Program Files x86 in Win7 is problem? Trying to get more insight.

    Thanks,

    Satya

    Wednesday, July 11, 2012 2:34 PM
  • No easy way around this one. You can install the 64-bit of Office which installs to C:\Program Files however the x86 Office will always install to C:\Program Files (x86)

    Every migration project I worked on used 32-bit office, this is because most companies use a lot of legacy 32-bit Office Addins and so require the 32-bit Office to work.

    My suggestion would be get the other application redeveloped to work in 64-bit. Or you could try this and I say this without knowing if it's a good option or not as in cases like this I always would get a compatible version rather than use a work around.

    But how about using a shim to intercept the call for the application and show that it's in the C:\Program Files\ path even when it's not. Kind of like a Symlink

    http://blogs.msdn.com/b/cjacks/archive/2007/10/15/using-the-correctfilepaths-shim-to-redirect-files-on-windows-vista.aspx


    PLEASE MARK ANY ANSWERS TO HELP OTHERS Blog: rorymon.com Twitter: @Rorymon

    • Proposed as answer by Jeremy_Wu Thursday, July 12, 2012 5:48 AM
    • Marked as answer by Nicholas Li Monday, July 30, 2012 2:44 AM
    Wednesday, July 11, 2012 4:16 PM