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On SharePoint Front End Servers where to store IIS logs? RRS feed

  • Question

  • Which is best place to save IIS logs on SharePoint Web Front End Server since our log files are increasing day by day too much.
    Sunday, May 25, 2014 10:26 AM

Answers

  • I normally add a separate drive for all the logs, including the SharePoint logs and the IIS logs.  You can control the level of logging and when the system should delete old logs to limit how much space they take up.

    Paul Stork SharePoint Server MVP
    Principal Architect: Blue Chip Consulting Group
    Blog: http://dontpapanic.com/blog
    Twitter: Follow @pstork
    Please remember to mark your question as "answered" if this solves your problem.

    • Marked as answer by JasonGuo Sunday, June 1, 2014 4:26 PM
    Sunday, May 25, 2014 11:18 AM
  • Not really, i'd never recommend using just RAID 0. For a start with two disks is normally no better than non RAID for write speed but it does double your risk of data loss (and the farm going down).

    It also means that in the event of a significant failure you're likely to loose all your logs, which can be a problem in some cases. You're right that you shouldn't use RAID 5 as it has a significant write penalty but the text book answer is RAID 10.

    In most cases it's somewhere on the SAN these days, in which case it'll be a RAID 10 array somewhere shared with other machines.

    I agree with Veera and Paul, a dedicated logs drive is a good idea, even if it's no more than a seperate partition on a single physical disk. It's worth mentioning that SharePoint can cap the amount of logs it makes but IIS has no built in log trimming process so after three years of operation you can easily have 10GB plus on each WFE built up...

    Monday, May 26, 2014 12:05 PM
  • Alex, it was a typo actually and I haven't noted it. I too will suggest going for RAID 10 and no second thoughts on it .Thanks for pointing that.

    Veeramani.S

    • Marked as answer by JasonGuo Sunday, June 1, 2014 4:26 PM
    Tuesday, May 27, 2014 7:54 AM

All replies

  • I normally add a separate drive for all the logs, including the SharePoint logs and the IIS logs.  You can control the level of logging and when the system should delete old logs to limit how much space they take up.

    Paul Stork SharePoint Server MVP
    Principal Architect: Blue Chip Consulting Group
    Blog: http://dontpapanic.com/blog
    Twitter: Follow @pstork
    Please remember to mark your question as "answered" if this solves your problem.

    • Marked as answer by JasonGuo Sunday, June 1, 2014 4:26 PM
    Sunday, May 25, 2014 11:18 AM
  • Its always good to keep an IIS logs in non OS drives and allocate the drive only for logs of IIS and SharePoint.Preferably RAID 0.

    Veeramani.S

    Monday, May 26, 2014 11:25 AM
  • Not really, i'd never recommend using just RAID 0. For a start with two disks is normally no better than non RAID for write speed but it does double your risk of data loss (and the farm going down).

    It also means that in the event of a significant failure you're likely to loose all your logs, which can be a problem in some cases. You're right that you shouldn't use RAID 5 as it has a significant write penalty but the text book answer is RAID 10.

    In most cases it's somewhere on the SAN these days, in which case it'll be a RAID 10 array somewhere shared with other machines.

    I agree with Veera and Paul, a dedicated logs drive is a good idea, even if it's no more than a seperate partition on a single physical disk. It's worth mentioning that SharePoint can cap the amount of logs it makes but IIS has no built in log trimming process so after three years of operation you can easily have 10GB plus on each WFE built up...

    Monday, May 26, 2014 12:05 PM
  • Alex, it was a typo actually and I haven't noted it. I too will suggest going for RAID 10 and no second thoughts on it .Thanks for pointing that.

    Veeramani.S

    • Marked as answer by JasonGuo Sunday, June 1, 2014 4:26 PM
    Tuesday, May 27, 2014 7:54 AM