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WaaS Question

    Question

  • I am working on a project to upgrade my works computers to Windows 10 CBB.  I am confused as to what happens once the CBB I deploy is no longer in service.  I have a lot of remote computers, and a lot of others in over 300 offices that are on incredibly slow connections, so I am nervous about having to update the OS on these every 15-18 months.  I know I can delay the upgrade, but what happens at the end of that delay?  Does Microsoft Upgrade it anyway, or is it just unsupported?

    I cannot find anything definitive that tells me the best way to handle this kind of situation.  LTSB looked appealing to me because of my situation, but everything I read about that, says don't go that route.  I do not have money to spend on upgrading the network, or on tools like 1E or Adaptiva.  I am stuck with what I have and am looking for any pointers on how others in similar situations are planning to handle this.

    Thanks

    Matt Robertson Sr.

    Monday, March 13, 2017 3:20 PM

Answers

  • Hi Matt,

    Why did you choose LTSB if you are so nervous about the update forcing release? What's your concern?

    Microsoft never publishes feature updates through Windows Update on devices that run Windows 10 Enterprise LTSB. Instead, it typically offers new LTSB releases every 2–3 years, and organizations can choose to install them as in-place upgrades or even skip releases over a 10-year life cycle.

    CBB is also reasonable. After18 months, generally Microsoft, independent software vendors (ISVs), partners, and customers believe that the release is ready for broad deployment.


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    Tuesday, March 14, 2017 2:47 AM
    Moderator

All replies

  • Hi Matt,

    Why did you choose LTSB if you are so nervous about the update forcing release? What's your concern?

    Microsoft never publishes feature updates through Windows Update on devices that run Windows 10 Enterprise LTSB. Instead, it typically offers new LTSB releases every 2–3 years, and organizations can choose to install them as in-place upgrades or even skip releases over a 10-year life cycle.

    CBB is also reasonable. After18 months, generally Microsoft, independent software vendors (ISVs), partners, and customers believe that the release is ready for broad deployment.


    Please remember to mark the replies as answers if they help.
    If you have feedback for TechNet Subscriber Support, contact tnmff@microsoft.com.

    Tuesday, March 14, 2017 2:47 AM
    Moderator
  • Hi,

    Was your issue resolved?

    If yes, please mark the helpful reply as answer in order that other community members could find the helpful reply quickly.

    If no, please reply and tell us the current situation in order to provide further help.


    Please remember to mark the replies as answers if they help.
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    Friday, March 17, 2017 9:29 AM
    Moderator
  • I didn't choose LTSB, I am fighting to use CBB, but there are some members of management who are more comfortable with using something that feels familiar to them, which is why it was also appealing to me, but then I also like to learn new things, so I pushed for CBB. I am pretty sure I will be able to use CBB, but I still want to know what happens on a Windows 10 device that reaches the end of its support.  Does it automatically update, or will we still have some control.  

    This is only an issue on a small percentage of our devices, but with their slow connections I want to make sure they have some flexibility.

    Monday, March 20, 2017 9:45 PM
  • Hi.

    The updates will be forcibly installed at the end of the date.


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    Wednesday, March 22, 2017 9:35 AM
    Moderator