locked
Removing my last Exchange 2003 Server - A question.... RRS feed

  • Question

  • We are at the point, where we want to remove our only Exchange 2003 server, by using Add and Remove programs to remove Exchange 2003. We have migrated finally to Exchange 2007.

    Using the TechNet document from Microsoft, which outlines the steps required to be taken, there is a list of steps that you need to go through to remove the server.

    My question revolves around public folders, we have already migrated all the mailboxes, SMTP connector, etc, in fact the Exchange 2007 server works as normal when the old 2003 server is turned off.

    In the removal steps it talks about the moving of the public folder hierarchy from the Exchange 2003 server to the Exchange 2007 Administration Hierarchy.

    My query is what does this actually do?. We have replicated the public folders to the new server and have dismounted the public folder database on the old server, and so there is no replication occurring between the 2 servers.

    We have removed the replica information on the public folders on the new Exchange 2007 server, so it is not able to replicate back to the old server, but the old server still has the new server on its list of replica servers, hence we just shutdown the Public Folder store once we thought the replication was okay .

    So when we create the new Public Folder Container in ESM 2003 on the new server, and then drag the public folders what will this do considering how the public folders are set at the moment? Is this just a virtual thing? or will it actually 'Do' something?

    Many thanks to anyone who takes the time to reply, its greatly appreciated

    Tuesday, March 19, 2013 4:33 PM

Answers

  • It moves the hierarchy tree ( and references to it) to the Exchange 2007/2010 Admin Group. Thats very important for a number of reasons:

    If you leave it in the 2003 legacy Admin group, you may find that mail messages and hierarchy messages to the PF server(s) may fail and

    If you ever inadvertently delete  the entire 2003 Legacy Admin Group ( which you dont want to do), you will break Public Folder access and replication since the references are gone as well. 


    Twitter!:

    • Marked as answer by Zi Feng Friday, March 29, 2013 2:08 AM
    Tuesday, March 19, 2013 6:29 PM
  • On Tue, 26 Mar 2013 15:33:19 +0000, kevin_cambs_uk wrote:
     
    >Thanks again mate for the reply
    >
    >these things can be tricky, especially when your job depends on it !!
     
    If your job depends on flawless operation and you don't have a lab
    that mimics your organization (where you can try all this stuff)
    you're in deep $hit.
     
    Get a big enhough server and set up a lab with VMs. If you make a
    mistake, restore the VM -- then try again.
     
    ---
    Rich Matheisen
    MCSE+I, Exchange MVP
     

    --- Rich Matheisen MCSE+I, Exchange MVP
    • Marked as answer by Zi Feng Friday, March 29, 2013 2:07 AM
    Tuesday, March 26, 2013 9:42 PM

All replies

  • It moves the hierarchy tree ( and references to it) to the Exchange 2007/2010 Admin Group. Thats very important for a number of reasons:

    If you leave it in the 2003 legacy Admin group, you may find that mail messages and hierarchy messages to the PF server(s) may fail and

    If you ever inadvertently delete  the entire 2003 Legacy Admin Group ( which you dont want to do), you will break Public Folder access and replication since the references are gone as well. 


    Twitter!:

    • Marked as answer by Zi Feng Friday, March 29, 2013 2:08 AM
    Tuesday, March 19, 2013 6:29 PM
  • Thank you very much for taking the time to reply,

    From what you say moving it is necessary, but my users will not notice any difference as all the public folders are on 2007 anyway?

    So just move it up to the 2007 admin grouip and no need to worry about adverse effects?

    thanks again

    Tuesday, March 26, 2013 12:35 PM
  • Exactly. The End users wont notice and you should really move it from the legacy Admin Group to the 2007/2010 one.


    Twitter!:

    Tuesday, March 26, 2013 12:53 PM
  • Thanks again mate for the reply

    these things can be tricky, especially when your job depends on it !!

    Tuesday, March 26, 2013 3:33 PM
  • On Tue, 26 Mar 2013 15:33:19 +0000, kevin_cambs_uk wrote:
     
    >Thanks again mate for the reply
    >
    >these things can be tricky, especially when your job depends on it !!
     
    If your job depends on flawless operation and you don't have a lab
    that mimics your organization (where you can try all this stuff)
    you're in deep $hit.
     
    Get a big enhough server and set up a lab with VMs. If you make a
    mistake, restore the VM -- then try again.
     
    ---
    Rich Matheisen
    MCSE+I, Exchange MVP
     

    --- Rich Matheisen MCSE+I, Exchange MVP
    • Marked as answer by Zi Feng Friday, March 29, 2013 2:07 AM
    Tuesday, March 26, 2013 9:42 PM